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  • Access to Wifi as a tax-funded public service??

    I was looking through what sorts of Windows laptops there are, and I discovered that there are the so-called "Chromebooks", which are essentially harddrive-less laptops where everything you do is on the internet, and I mean EVERYTHING.

    This is a great model and something that I would like to use rather than carrying around a bulky laptop. When the technology reaches a certain point, I would indeed like to stream everything I own.

    The problem with this model is that, with the exception of societies like South Korea (where there is free wifi virtually everywhere) you cannot assure that you get web access everywhere. The only solution, it seems, that would be reasonable is to build tax-funded wifi infrastructure throughout all urban areas within a sovereign state. Internet, in a sense, would be completely "free" (you're paying taxes) where ever you try to access it.

    Considering the immese advantages that one requires from online access, it ought to be a right for everyone to have access to.

    Originally Posted by Noam Chomsky


    Whenever you hear anything said very confidently, the first thing that should come to mind is, wait a minute is that true?

  • #2
    I think there a few cities in the States doing this. I know the keep proposing it here in Rochester (hasn't become a reality yet) It certainly seems like a great way to attract businesses as well as residents.

    Comment


    • radomu
      radomu commented
      Editing a comment

      Big_Conig wrote:
      I think there a few cities in the States doing this. I know the keep proposing it here in Rochester (hasn't become a reality yet) It certainly seems like a great way to attract businesses as well as residents.

      Didn't know that. You mean outside of silicone valley?


  • #3

    I have always thought that this would be a good idea. 

    Seems like it would generate tax revenue, encourage local small business, etc.

     

    .

     

     

    Stay above this line.



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    Comment


    • #4
      I live in the Denver area and have stopped going to restaurants and coffee shops that don't have Wi-Fi. Just about all libraries have Wi-Fi, many businesses too. (Bars too.)

      Comment


      • Hoddy
        Hoddy commented
        Editing a comment

        WynnD wrote:
        I live in the Denver area and have stopped going to restaurants and coffee shops that don't have Wi-Fi. (Bars too.)

        Why?


    • #5

      Who has access to your data?  Who mines that data and for what purpose.  How much profit can a company make from monetizing your information?  Who says what information is acceptable.  How much of that information can you control?

      Just a few of the issues going on in the Eu.  The US is trying to stop Eu. data privacy legislation.

      http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/01/proposed-eu-data-protection-reform-could-start-a-trade-war-us-official-says/

      Is it your information or someone elses.  This is a few of the cons about cloud data that those little pads rely on.

      Comment


      • #6

        radomu wrote:

        I was looking through what sorts of Windows laptops there are, and I discovered that there are the so-called "Chromebooks", which are essentially harddrive-less laptops where everything you do is on the internet, and I mean EVERYTHING.

        This is a great model and something that I would like to use rather than carrying around a bulky laptop. When the technology reaches a certain point, I would indeed like to stream everything I own.

        The problem with this model is that, with the exception of societies like South Korea (where there is free wifi virtually everywhere) you cannot assure that you get web access everywhere. The only solution, it seems, that would be reasonable is to build tax-funded wifi infrastructure throughout all urban areas within a sovereign state. Internet, in a sense, would be completely "free" (you're paying taxes) where ever you try to access it.

        Considering the immese advantages that one requires from online access, it ought to be a right for everyone to have access to.


        Given the immense amount of taxpayer dollars already being spent above and beyond that which the federal government is empowered by the Constitution to spend, I'm sure you can get them to go along with it.

        Comment


        • #7
          I'm not talking about the US, but in general.
          Originally Posted by Noam Chomsky


          Whenever you hear anything said very confidently, the first thing that should come to mind is, wait a minute is that true?

          Comment


          • #8

             

            Fuck that...we need more drones.

             

             

            :robotmad:

            Comment


            • Another Brick
              Another Brick commented
              Editing a comment
              Not impressive to me. I happen to live in one of the white areas in the map between coverage areas. My work is covered, but I don't have time to play on the net while while at work. I'm one of the few people here at HCPP that actually work at work.

              A vendor visited work one day to give us a lunchtime presentation. She had no problem working it as she set up her laptop in the 11AM hour. Come noon the thing slowed to a crawl and she had to waist time to get her laptop feed off of our network. She was rather embarrassed. I suppose all of the students at the nearby University jammed the thing when they were let out out of class. The thing needs beefing up.

          • #9
            The State enlarges itself when the class of political and economic elites demand it, as Washington decided to tax Whiskey Brewers, Adams subverting freedom of speech by cracking down on "sedition", and so on. A small government was not an unanimous goal for all the founders, as probably half of them wanted a protectionist state-guided economy. Obviously Hamilton won over Jefferson in this debate now that the US has been industrialising gradually throughout the 19th century. Therefore, businessmen in America or any country never wanted a small government or a free market economy because they knew that running the government as an institution that protected their interests was the best solution. This has not changed since the founding of the nation.

            Therefore you have it completely backwards because your premise is pure fabrication. The New Deal era is the result of the empowerment of organised labour, where the government then was pressured to finally act in the public interest in to a noticeable extent. The public, meaning the majority of the American population that constitute society as the "people" rather than business elites.
            Originally Posted by Noam Chomsky


            Whenever you hear anything said very confidently, the first thing that should come to mind is, wait a minute is that true?

            Comment


            • #10
              The recapitalisation of GM is conveniently carried out so that it will be handed backed to the stockholders after its restructuring. It's the precise example of corporate welfare, has happened in many instances when business elites decide that they don't want to deal with market forces and let their corporation fail so they ask the state for a rescue package.
              Originally Posted by Noam Chomsky


              Whenever you hear anything said very confidently, the first thing that should come to mind is, wait a minute is that true?

              Comment


              • #11

                http://vimeo.com/59236702

                Comment


                • #12
                  We don't need the opinion of radical communists like bill movers and Susan crawford
                  Originally Posted by Noam Chomsky


                  Whenever you hear anything said very confidently, the first thing that should come to mind is, wait a minute is that true?

                  Comment



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