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  • Defensive medicine under attack

    d
     
    Defensive medicine under attack
    By Kirsty Oswald, medwireNews Reporter
    14 February 2013
    Dig Liver Dis 2013; Advance online publication

    medwireNews: Around one-eighth of all requests for tests and procedures by gastroenterologists are attributable to the practice of defensive medicine, Italian research shows.

    The authors say that the rapid increase in malpractice and negligence lawsuits in recent years has led to the widespread practice of defensive medicine, in which physicians make clinical decisions in order to avoid litigation, and which are not necessarily in the best interests of the patient.

    Indeed, 93.8\% of the 64 gastroenterologists questioned in the study admitted to the behavior, with two (3.1\%) even saying it was the only criteria they used to make decisions in daily practice.

    "[Our results] clearly show that [defensive medicine] is now a well established way of thinking in the decision making process of gastroenterologists, and that it represents a significant cost that could prove to be a very heavy burden in the currently critical economic situation," say Luca Elli (University of Milan) and colleagues.

    On average, gastroenterologists requested 8.9 defensive procedures per month, including colonoscopies, endoscopies, imaging, and consultations. Additionally, they reported performing an average of 76.5 procedures per month as a result of the referring physicians performing defensive medicine.

    The authors estimate that defensive medicine accounted for 11\% of monthly costs for procedures and that, when costs for requests and procedures performed were combined, the average monthly cost of defensive medicine was

    Attached Files

  • #2

    The Cost of Health Care and the Effects of Defensive Medicine

    Defensive medicine increases the cost of health care in America by an estimated $99 to $179 billion a year, or about 7 percent of total national healthcare expenditures.

     

     

    Turn on any news channel or read any newspaper and I guarantee you will find a headline concerninghealth

    Comment


    • Davo17
      Davo17 commented
      Editing a comment

      Defensive medicine accounts for 20 percent of all imaging orders

      According to the results of a study presented on Wednesday, nearly 20 percent of all imaging orders by participating orthopaedic surgeons in Pennsylvania could be attributed to defensive medicine practices. Half of the images ordered for defensive medicine purposes were magnetic resonance images (MRIs).

      For many years now, some physicians have ordered specific diagnostic procedures that are of little or no benefit to a patient, largely to protect themselves from a lawsuit. Until now, however, efforts to actually measure defensive medicine practices have been limited primarily to surveys sent to physicians. Such surveys would simply ask whether or not that individual actually practiced defensive medicine.


  • #3

    Davo17 wrote:
    d
     
    Defensive medicine under attack
    By Kirsty Oswald, medwireNews Reporter
    14 February 2013
    Dig Liver Dis 2013; Advance online publication

    medwireNews: Around one-eighth of all requests for tests and procedures by gastroenterologists are attributable to the practice of defensive medicine, Italian research shows.

     


     Italian research shows.

     

     Italian research shows?

    WTF


    I have never heard of the Italian Research Institute. We get our data on US health care from Italy? Seriously?

    What kind of a story is supported by citing some non-existant research study?

    Agenda?

     Oh, I think so. How about tort reform. 

    These guys in the medical profession just want to be exempted from law suits and they prop it up with unsupprted data (from fricking Italy) in this *inside the industry* publication. 

     

    this from The National Bureau of Economic Research

    This research was funded in part by the National Institute on Aging (grant P01-AG19783-02).

    The authors also explore the effect of rising malpractice premiums on the frequency of various medical treatments. Although there is no change in the frequency of most treatments, there is increased use of mammography, suggesting that physicians may increase the use of screening procedures in response to higher premiums. The authors find no effect of premiums on total Medicare expenditures, suggesting that the costs associated with defensive medicine practices may be small, at least for this age group.

    The authors caution that their results may not capture the full effect of rising malpractice premiums if doctors respond to the medical liability situation in states other than their own. Nonetheless, they conclude "the arguments that state tort reforms will avert local physician shortages or lead to greater efficiencies in care are not supported by our findings."


     

     

     

    Attached Files
    To you I'm an atheist; but to God, I'm the Loyal Opposition.

    Comment


    • Davo17
      Davo17 commented
      Editing a comment
      it was indended to show this is not a unique problem to the US.  Theres a clear link between defensive medicine and increased strain on the system.  Its not unique to the US, and in placed where socialized medicine is standard (italy, UK, Canada, etc) there is a CLEAR link to decreased resources, and lower patient outcomes.  Read the other articles before dismissing the findings out of hand-its intellectually lazy otherwise. 
      RogueGnome wrote:

      Davo17 wrote:
      d
       
      Defensive medicine under attack
      By Kirsty Oswald, medwireNews Reporter
      14 February 2013
      Dig Liver Dis 2013; Advance online publication

      medwireNews: Around one-eighth of all requests for tests and procedures by gastroenterologists are attributable to the practice of defensive medicine, Italian research shows.

       


       Italian research shows.

       

       Italian research shows?

      WTF


      I have never heard of the Italian Research Institute. We get our data on US health care from Italy? Seriously?

      What kind of a story is supported by citing some non-existant research study?

      Agenda?

       Oh, I think so. How about tort reform. 

      These guys in the medical profession just want to be exempted from law suits and they prop it up with unsupprted data (from fricking Italy) in this *inside the industry* publication. 

       

      this from The National Bureau of Economic Research

      This research was funded in part by the National Institute on Aging (grant P01-AG19783-02).

      The authors also explore the effect of rising malpractice premiums on the frequency of various medical treatments. Although there is no change in the frequency of most treatments, there is increased use of mammography, suggesting that physicians may increase the use of screening procedures in response to higher premiums. The authors find no effect of premiums on total Medicare expenditures, suggesting that the costs associated with defensive medicine practices may be small, at least for this age group.

      The authors caution that their results may not capture the full effect of rising malpractice premiums if doctors respond to the medical liability situation in states other than their own. Nonetheless, they conclude "the arguments that state tort reforms will avert local physician shortages or lead to greater efficiencies in care are not supported by our findings."


       

       

       


       

      Attached Files

  • #4
    John... if only you could buy insurance across state lines.you'd be hunky dory, well that and tort reform
    I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll be glad to take a look

    Float like a butterfly, sting like VD

    What happens up north, stays up north

    Comment


    • John Ellis
      John Ellis commented
      Editing a comment

      55gibby wrote:
      John... if only you could buy insurance across state lines.you'd be hunky dory, well that and tort reform

       

        And if you weren't 1500 miles away, I'd piss on your leg and dare you to do something about it.


  • #5
    Everyone knows the real money is in treatment... not.prevention. this is one area where the Obama Care is a ****************ty piece of legislation... tying cost to expenditure will always drive up cost
    I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll be glad to take a look

    Float like a butterfly, sting like VD

    What happens up north, stays up north

    Comment



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