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  • Yep, we're wussifying...

    We have a LEO in the family.  He's got kids in the local schools, and he's often called in to do "Meet Office Joe" duty.  Show and tell,  "don't take candy or rides from strangers" lecture, etc.  Let's the elementary school kids hit the sirens and lights on the cruiser during annual outdoor picnic events at the schools, let's them sit in the back of the cruiser.  I'm sure many of you Americans reading this had a local cop come to your school each year for something similar.  I know I did.

    So last week, he's headed to the middle school his daughter attends at the request of one of the teachers.  Gets to the school (he's in full uniform), checks in at the front desk to let them know he's in the building.  He brings in a lot of gear for show and tell (riot gear, shotgun, first aid bag).  I know he hates unpacking all that **************** from his cruiser's trunk, but he's a softie when it comes to kids so he does it.

    The assistant at the front desk sees the shotgun case and says she thinks the principal might object to the shotgun.  He tells her he's done this presentaton before, the shotgun is unloaded, he doesn't hand it to the kids.  She still hesitates.  He tells her "You realize I'm carrying my duty sidearm, right?"  She still hesitates and says she thinks the principal should weigh in on it.  A few minutes later, the principal meets him at the classroom door and says she isn't comfortable with the shotgun, and would prefer he put it back in the cruiser.

    Of course the principal is the head honcho of a school, and what he or she says, goes.  But really, now we can't trust a state certified law enforcement officer with an unloaded shotgun as part of a presentation to a bunch of adolescents?  Their young eyes have to be shielded from the evil images of a police shotgun, lest they get the wrong impression?

    Is the shotgun necessary for show and tell?  No.  It's just a part of his presentation explaining what a police officer carries in the cruiser for crime fighting, life saving, civil emergencies, etc.

    Guns exist.  Hiding them from kids in a hope that they'll somehow magically forget they exist is a foolish attempt at alternate reality.


    Current global warming temperature trend: 0.05ºC per decade, plus or minus 0.1ºC (source: UN IPCC AR5) ...Yes, the error rate is higher than the estimated rate of change.

    "Anthropogenic global warming is a proposed theory whose basic mechanism is well understood, but whose magnitude is highly uncertain. The growing evidence that climate models are too sensitive to CO2 has implications for the attribution of late-20th-century warming and projections of 21st-century climate. If the recent warming hiatus is caused by natural variability, then this raises the question as to what extent the warming between 1975 and 2000 can also be explained by natural climate variability." --Dr. Judith Curry, chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology

  • #2

    It couldn't possibly be a liability concern....

     

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    Comment


    • Hoddy
      Hoddy commented
      Editing a comment


    • Kardula
      Kardula commented
      Editing a comment

      Kreatorkind wrote:

      It couldn't possibly be a liability concern....

       



      Came here to post this.../thread


  • #3

    rbstern wrote:

    We have a LEO in the family.  He's got kids in the local schools, and he's often called in to do "Meet Office Joe" duty.  Show and tell,  "don't take candy or rides from strangers" lecture, etc.  Let's the elementary school kids hit the sirens and lights on the cruiser during annual outdoor picnic events at the schools, let's them sit in the back of the cruiser.  I'm sure many of you Americans reading this had a local cop come to your school each year for something similar.  I know I did.

    So last week, he's headed to the middle school his daughter attends at the request of one of the teachers.  Gets to the school (he's in full uniform), checks in at the front desk to let them know he's in the building.  He brings in a lot of gear for show and tell (riot gear, shotgun, first aid bag).  I know he hates unpacking all that **************** from his cruiser's trunk, but he's a softie when it comes to kids so he does it.

    The assistant at the front desk sees the shotgun case and says she thinks the principal might object to the shotgun.  He tells her he's done this presentaton before, the shotgun is unloaded, he doesn't hand it to the kids.  She still hesitates.  He tells her "You realize I'm carrying my duty sidearm, right?"  She still hesitates and says she thinks the principal should weigh in on it.  A few minutes later, the principal meets him at the classroom door and says she isn't comfortable with the shotgun, and would prefer he put it back in the cruiser.

    Of course the principal is the head honcho of a school, and what he or she says, goes.  But really, now we can't trust a state certified law enforcement officer with an unloaded shotgun as part of a presentation to a bunch of adolescents?  Their young eyes have to be shielded from the evil images of a police shotgun, lest they get the wrong impression?

    Is the shotgun necessary for show and tell?  No.  It's just a part of his presentation explaining what a police officer carries in the cruiser for crime fighting, life saving, civil emergencies, etc.

    Guns exist.  Hiding them from kids in a hope that they'll somehow magically forget they exist is a foolish attempt at alternate reality.


    We are teaching kids that inanimate objects in and of themselves are an issue.

    I do those career days and while the cops do have a sidearm,  they don't show guns.

    Of course many kids want to know about them, they are curious and most have only seen them on TV.

    We are raising a generation of robots.

    Comment


    • Just Me
      Just Me commented
      Editing a comment

      well, I dont agree with it, but the principal made a judgement call, so it is what it is.

       

      Maybe she was trying to stress the "peacekeeping" aspect of LE, and not the "blow your head off" aspect...

       

      I'm sure the boys would have liked to have seen it, the girls probably wouldnt care.


    • RogueGnome
      RogueGnome commented
      Editing a comment

      Davo17 wrote:

      We are teaching kids that inanimate objects in and of themselves are an issue.


      that's cool.

      Explain that to TSA next time you try to get onboard a commercial carrier with your 9mm.


  • #4

    rbstern wrote:

    We have a LEO in the family.  He's got kids in the local schools, and he's often called in to do "Meet Office Joe" duty.  Show and tell,  "don't take candy or rides from strangers" lecture, etc.  Let's the elementary school kids hit the sirens and lights on the cruiser during annual outdoor picnic events at the schools, let's them sit in the back of the cruiser.  I'm sure many of you Americans reading this had a local cop come to your school each year for something similar.  I know I did.

    So last week, he's headed to the middle school his daughter attends at the request of one of the teachers.  Gets to the school (he's in full uniform), checks in at the front desk to let them know he's in the building.  He brings in a lot of gear for show and tell (riot gear, shotgun, first aid bag).  I know he hates unpacking all that **************** from his cruiser's trunk, but he's a softie when it comes to kids so he does it.

    The assistant at the front desk sees the shotgun case and says she thinks the principal might object to the shotgun.  He tells her he's done this presentaton before, the shotgun is unloaded, he doesn't hand it to the kids.  She still hesitates.  He tells her "You realize I'm carrying my duty sidearm, right?"  She still hesitates and says she thinks the principal should weigh in on it.  A few minutes later, the principal meets him at the classroom door and says she isn't comfortable with the shotgun, and would prefer he put it back in the cruiser.

    Of course the principal is the head honcho of a school, and what he or she says, goes.  But really, now we can't trust a state certified law enforcement officer with an unloaded shotgun as part of a presentation to a bunch of adolescents?  Their young eyes have to be shielded from the evil images of a police shotgun, lest they get the wrong impression?

    Is the shotgun necessary for show and tell?  No.  It's just a part of his presentation explaining what a police officer carries in the cruiser for crime fighting, life saving, civil emergencies, etc.

    Guns exist.  Hiding them from kids in a hope that they'll somehow magically forget they exist is a foolish attempt at alternate reality.


    Sounds reasonable to me.  In 5th grade we had a cop come in and talk.  Outside in the parking lot he showed us his car, and a shotgun in the trunk.  This was in 1995, near Albany, NY.  There's nothing "wussy" about being wary of guns.  No reason to bring weapons into a school.  **************** happens. 

    Comment


    • #5

      rbstern wrote:

      We have a LEO in the family.  He's got kids in the local schools, and he's often called in to do "Meet Office Joe" duty.  Show and tell,  "don't take candy or rides from strangers" lecture, etc.  Let's the elementary school kids hit the sirens and lights on the cruiser during annual outdoor picnic events at the schools, let's them sit in the back of the cruiser.  I'm sure many of you Americans reading this had a local cop come to your school each year for something similar.  I know I did.

      So last week, he's headed to the middle school his daughter attends at the request of one of the teachers.  Gets to the school (he's in full uniform), checks in at the front desk to let them know he's in the building.  He brings in a lot of gear for show and tell (riot gear, shotgun, first aid bag).  I know he hates unpacking all that **************** from his cruiser's trunk, but he's a softie when it comes to kids so he does it.

      The assistant at the front desk sees the shotgun case and says she thinks the principal might object to the shotgun.  He tells her he's done this presentaton before, the shotgun is unloaded, he doesn't hand it to the kids.  She still hesitates.  He tells her "You realize I'm carrying my duty sidearm, right?"  She still hesitates and says she thinks the principal should weigh in on it.  A few minutes later, the principal meets him at the classroom door and says she isn't comfortable with the shotgun, and would prefer he put it back in the cruiser.

      Of course the principal is the head honcho of a school, and what he or she says, goes.  But really, now we can't trust a state certified law enforcement officer with an unloaded shotgun as part of a presentation to a bunch of adolescents?  Their young eyes have to be shielded from the evil images of a police shotgun, lest they get the wrong impression?

      Is the shotgun necessary for show and tell?  No.  It's just a part of his presentation explaining what a police officer carries in the cruiser for crime fighting, life saving, civil emergencies, etc.

      Guns exist.  Hiding them from kids in a hope that they'll somehow magically forget they exist is a foolish attempt at alternate reality.


      Nice to see you defending LE for a change.

      _________________________________________

      “True unalienable rights do not require one to trample other unalienable rights.”
      ―J.S.B. Morse

      Comment



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