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  • Meanwhile in Israel - some sanity at last!

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_ISRAEL_CULTURAL_WAR?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLA TE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-04-25-17-14-20

     

    Some "New Politicians" are actively working on breaking the stranglehold of the ultra-Orthodox minority, and taking about taking away some of the absurd privileges they have accumulated.

     

    JERUSALEM (AP) -- A cultural war has erupted between Israel's rising political star and his ultra-Orthodox rivals.

    Newly minted Finance Minister Yair Lapid, hugely popular for opposing the long-standing preferential treatment enjoyed by the religious minority, is moving swiftly to slash state handouts to large families, compel lifelong seminary students to work and join the army, and remove funding for schools that don't teach math, science and English.

    The religious - labeled "parasites" by one Lapid emissary this week - are crying foul. But they appear helpless, at least in the short run, to stop Lapid from pressing his agenda.

    For most of the last three decades, the country's small ultra-Orthodox minority sat in governing coalitions, securing vast budgets for religious schools and automatic exemptions from mandatory military service for tens of thousands of young men in full-time religious studies.

    Tapping into widespread resentment over these expensive perks, Lapid made a strong showing in January elections. His new Yesh Atid, or There is a Future, party finished second in the voting, turning him into the newest star of Israeli politics and propelling him to a senior position in the governing coalition.

    The religious parties, meanwhile, were pushed into the opposition.

    Lapid, facing a yawning deficit, has moved quickly to drastically slash budgets favoring the ultra-Orthodox.

    "I say, let there be war," Lapid said in a speech Wednesday.

     


    About bloody time, I say. These Haredim have accumulated a disproportionate amount of influence in Israeli politics - not just cushy financial subsidies and service exemptions for themselves, but they also influence Israeli foreign policy to a significant (and disproportionate) degree. I'd love to see this guy bust them up

    Keep the company of those who seek the truth, and run from those who have found it.

    -- Vaclav Havel

    The Universe is unimaginably vast. For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.

    -- Carl Sagan


    Life - the way it really is - is a battle not between Bad and Good but between Bad and Worse.

    -- Joseph Brodsky

  • #2

    If Israel can break the stranglehold of their hardcore over-privledged loony right, maybe there is hope for us.

     

     

     

     

    But it's probably a pipe dream, his rivals will take care of him.

    __________________________________________________
    Politics are like sports, where both teams suck

    Maybe we can all just agree that Bush was stupid and Cheney was lying and call it a day. - guitarcapo

    Originally posted by Grumpy_Polecat View Post
    For the record: Hitler using gas to exterminate his presumed enemies does not equal the use of chemical weapons.
    Reprehensible as it was, gassing was a conventional and accepted method for execution at the time. It is a stretch to equivocate the two.

    Comment


    • #3

      You are absolutely right, Anton!  These people would claim, if I was in Israel, that my marriage to my wife, officiated by a Conservative rabbi, was not a "Jewish" wedding because he wasn't an Orthodox rabbi.  They started protests and riots because the Ashkinazim orthodox demanded to be able to segregate themselves in state-funded schools, from Sephardim orthodox because they claimed the Sephardim weren't "orthodox" enough.

      Parasites, dictators, religious fanatics.  Like all religious fanatics, IMHO, they are worthless. Worse than worthless.  Dangerous. If Israel fails to survive it will be because of them.

      Comment


      • Notu
        Notu commented
        Editing a comment

        Well if this doesn't complicate the penny-pincher Jewish stereotype, I don't know what will.  :robotembarrassed:


    • #4

      Israel has two problems: One is the "It's All OURS" fallacy resulting from a combination of the Balfore Declaration and a biased reading of the Old Testament. The other is the "Battle Of Britain" mentality caused by constant warfare with their Arab neighbors, who surround Israel. 

      If the ultra-orthodox Jewish political parties lose strength, that may or may not help the peace process by realizing that Jews and Muslims have to share the same land. But don't count on it. 

      The other thing that would help is if both sides stop suspecting -- and blaming -- each other of starting the war. Right now, neither side trusts the other, so giving up retalliation in favor of peace will be even more difficult. 

      But armchair quarterbacking and back seat driving have never solved anything; those folks on both sides will have to work things out for themselves.

      __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ______________
      How Come Other People Can Get Away With Jokes Like That?

      Face it Tea Bagging Neo-Cons...if Reagan ran today, you'd be calling him a RINO socialist! -- scott666

      Barack Obama must be kenyan - everytime he speaks they trot a translator out the next day to explain what he said.-- ToBeAnnounced

      And even then some people still don't understand.-- RogueGnome

      Comment


      • snebarekim
        snebarekim commented
        Editing a comment

        The Badger wrote:

         

        If the ultra-orthodox Jewish political parties lose strength, that may or may not help the peace process by realizing that Jews and Muslims have to share the same land. But don't count on it. 

         

         



        I suspect you are making the mistake of equating Israelis with religous jews (orthodox or not). Even the most liberal, atheist Israelis I know here (Tel Aviv is full of them) have a strong nationalist streak, much more so than conservative Americans IMO (and Americans are ridiculed for it constantly, by foreigners and the American left).

         

        After the last round of rockets from Gaza, and a bus blown up in Tel Aviv (three blocks from where I was at the moment), even the most liberal in Tel Aviv were pissed. English language Haaretz tends to mis represent things, sort of like our MSM.

         


    • #5

      Red Ant wrote:

      For most of the last three decades, the country's small ultra-Orthodox minority sat in governing coalitions, securing vast budgets for religious schools and automatic exemptions from mandatory military service for tens of thousands of young men in full-time religious studies.


      That always happens when the Right gets into power.

      Comment


      • #6

        Red Ant wrote:

        http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_ISRAEL_CULTURAL_WAR?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLA TE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-04-25-17-14-20

         

        Some "New Politicians" are actively working on breaking the stranglehold of the ultra-Orthodox minority, and taking about taking away some of the absurd privileges they have accumulated.

         

        JERUSALEM (AP) -- A cultural war has erupted between Israel's rising political star and his ultra-Orthodox rivals.

        Newly minted Finance Minister Yair Lapid, hugely popular for opposing the long-standing preferential treatment enjoyed by the religious minority, is moving swiftly to slash state handouts to large families, compel lifelong seminary students to work and join the army, and remove funding for schools that don't teach math, science and English.

        The religious - labeled "parasites" by one Lapid emissary this week - are crying foul. But they appear helpless, at least in the short run, to stop Lapid from pressing his agenda.

        For most of the last three decades, the country's small ultra-Orthodox minority sat in governing coalitions, securing vast budgets for religious schools and automatic exemptions from mandatory military service for tens of thousands of young men in full-time religious studies.

        Tapping into widespread resentment over these expensive perks, Lapid made a strong showing in January elections. His new Yesh Atid, or There is a Future, party finished second in the voting, turning him into the newest star of Israeli politics and propelling him to a senior position in the governing coalition.

        The religious parties, meanwhile, were pushed into the opposition.

        Lapid, facing a yawning deficit, has moved quickly to drastically slash budgets favoring the ultra-Orthodox.

        "I say, let there be war," Lapid said in a speech Wednesday.

         


        About bloody time, I say. These Haredim have accumulated a disproportionate amount of influence in Israeli politics - not just cushy financial subsidies and service exemptions for themselves, but they also influence Israeli foreign policy to a significant (and disproportionate) degree. I'd love to see this guy bust them up


        My local friends and associates here, from far apart as Haifa, Tel Aviv, Beer sheva and Jerusalem(my job includes a bit of travel within Israel), all have indicated a "Its about time!" type of response to this direction.

         

        Comment


        • #7

          It's good news! 

           

          I don't know how many of you have seen this documentary, The Gatekeepers - made by an Israeli filmmaker, it's series of interviews with 6 former heads of Shin Bet:

          http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2309788/

           

          Among other things it makes very clear to what extent extremists have highjacked Israeli foreign policy. Strongly recommended!

          Comment


          • #8

            Red Ant wrote:

            http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_ISRAEL_CULTURAL_WAR?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLA TE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-04-25-17-14-20

             

            Some "New Politicians" are actively working on breaking the stranglehold of the ultra-Orthodox minority, and taking about taking away some of the absurd privileges they have accumulated.

             

            JERUSALEM (AP) -- A cultural war has erupted between Israel's rising political star and his ultra-Orthodox rivals.

            Newly minted Finance Minister Yair Lapid, hugely popular for opposing the long-standing preferential treatment enjoyed by the religious minority, is moving swiftly to slash state handouts to large families, compel lifelong seminary students to work and join the army, and remove funding for schools that don't teach math, science and English.

            The religious - labeled "parasites" by one Lapid emissary this week - are crying foul. But they appear helpless, at least in the short run, to stop Lapid from pressing his agenda.

            For most of the last three decades, the country's small ultra-Orthodox minority sat in governing coalitions, securing vast budgets for religious schools and automatic exemptions from mandatory military service for tens of thousands of young men in full-time religious studies.

            Tapping into widespread resentment over these expensive perks, Lapid made a strong showing in January elections. His new Yesh Atid, or There is a Future, party finished second in the voting, turning him into the newest star of Israeli politics and propelling him to a senior position in the governing coalition.

            The religious parties, meanwhile, were pushed into the opposition.

            Lapid, facing a yawning deficit, has moved quickly to drastically slash budgets favoring the ultra-Orthodox.

            "I say, let there be war," Lapid said in a speech Wednesday.

             


            About bloody time, I say. These Haredim have accumulated a disproportionate amount of influence in Israeli politics - not just cushy financial subsidies and service exemptions for themselves, but they also influence Israeli foreign policy to a significant (and disproportionate) degree. I'd love to see this guy bust them up


             

            How does Yair Lapid feel about the Palestinians being treated as equals to the Israelis?

            Comment


            • Caulk Rocket
              Caulk Rocket commented
              Editing a comment

              Graeca wrote:

              Red Ant wrote:

              http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_ISRAEL_CULTURAL_WAR?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLA TE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-04-25-17-14-20

               

              Some "New Politicians" are actively working on breaking the stranglehold of the ultra-Orthodox minority, and taking about taking away some of the absurd privileges they have accumulated.

               

              JERUSALEM (AP) -- A cultural war has erupted between Israel's rising political star and his ultra-Orthodox rivals.

              Newly minted Finance Minister Yair Lapid, hugely popular for opposing the long-standing preferential treatment enjoyed by the religious minority, is moving swiftly to slash state handouts to large families, compel lifelong seminary students to work and join the army, and remove funding for schools that don't teach math, science and English.

              The religious - labeled "parasites" by one Lapid emissary this week - are crying foul. But they appear helpless, at least in the short run, to stop Lapid from pressing his agenda.

              For most of the last three decades, the country's small ultra-Orthodox minority sat in governing coalitions, securing vast budgets for religious schools and automatic exemptions from mandatory military service for tens of thousands of young men in full-time religious studies.

              Tapping into widespread resentment over these expensive perks, Lapid made a strong showing in January elections. His new Yesh Atid, or There is a Future, party finished second in the voting, turning him into the newest star of Israeli politics and propelling him to a senior position in the governing coalition.

              The religious parties, meanwhile, were pushed into the opposition.

              Lapid, facing a yawning deficit, has moved quickly to drastically slash budgets favoring the ultra-Orthodox.

              "I say, let there be war," Lapid said in a speech Wednesday.

               


              About bloody time, I say. These Haredim have accumulated a disproportionate amount of influence in Israeli politics - not just cushy financial subsidies and service exemptions for themselves, but they also influence Israeli foreign policy to a significant (and disproportionate) degree. I'd love to see this guy bust them up


               

              How does Yair Lapid feel about the Palestinians being treated as equals to the Israelis?


               

               

              Probably worse than even some on the right.

               

               

              "You know my father didn't come here from the ghetto in order to live in a country that is half Arab, half Jewish. He came here to live in a Jewish state. And we have 3.3 million Palestinians now between the sea and the eastern border of Israel. If we don't do something about it, her generation [nods toward a 15-year-old girl at our table] is going to spend her time with six or seven or eight million Palestinians. So doing nothing about it is shortsighted. "

              http://world.time.com/2013/01/31/yair-lapid-an-interview-with-israels-new-power-broker/

               

               


              Lapid's platform: No compromise over Jerusalem, no settlement freeze


              On the Palestinian issue, the new leader of the Israeli center holds positions that take several steps back from ideas held by Israeli negotiators in the previous decade.




              Yair Lapid: Palestinians not ready to make peace

              Journalist turned politician Yair Lapid blamed the Palestinians for the failure to reach a breakthrough in the peace process in a speech on Monday at Tel Aviv University.

              Lapid distanced himself from politicians on the Left who have blamed Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu for the diplomatic stalemate.



               

               

               


          • #9

            Hmm...  Why do the faithfull have an air of privilege?

            Christian nation? Really? Isn't it an American nation?

            Israel still sucks.

            -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            "Faith ruled the Dark Ages."

            Comment













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