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  • Isolated Randy Rhoads Guitar Tracks

    Someone has posted these. This is pretty cool, or at least I think so, to hear. I was about 20 and living in Odessa, Tx when that first Ozzy record was released and I remember rushing out to buy it. I learned the Crazy Train riff by watching a band in a night club there not long after. Those were the days!

    This also kind of reminds me of that song learning website I'd posted about quite a while back where they isolate the actual studio instrument/vocal recordings so that the various instrument parts can be learned just as they were played. Although the name of the website eludes me right now I have received a couple of e-mails from them. They have gotten the thing off the ground but I believe they only have an iPad app so far and, of course, a rather limited song selection.
    http://www.crazydeliciousband.com/

  • #2
    f***n KILLER!!!!!

    Thanks Greg.
    Kickin' it in the sticks...

    Comment


    • #3
      Seen Randy live in Houston Tx back in 1981 thanks for reminding how old I'm getting

      Comment


      • #4
        Seen Randy live in Houston Tx back in 1981 thanks for reminding how old I'm getting


        NP!


        I'm not sure how I got signed into the Guitar Squid e-mail newsletter but it's always got some interesting/curious/funny links. I'd recommend it as a great time waster!
        http://www.crazydeliciousband.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Hell ya, I knew some of us would dig this. The panned double tracking on the leads is really cool, that's a lot of work but really fattens it up.

          Yeah, especially on "Over the Mountain". I love how it winds up dead center for the last lead. Also love the different tone on the last lead. Knowing that Randy recorded that album with his Marshall's really shows how Max Norman was able to control that raging sound. He apparently put his Marshall's outside of a sliding glass door of some kind, outside the entire studio.
          Kickin' it in the sticks...

          Comment


          • #6
            Very awesome!
            * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
            My cover band

            HARD WORK BEATS TALENT WHEN TALENT DOESN'T WORK HARD

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            • #7
              Someone has posted these. This is pretty cool, or at least I think so, to hear. I was about 20 and living in Odessa, Tx when that first Ozzy record was released and I remember rushing out to buy it. I learned the Crazy Train riff by watching a band in a night club there not long after. Those were the days!

              This also kind of reminds me of that song learning website I'd posted about quite a while back where they isolate the actual studio instrument/vocal recordings so that the various instrument parts can be learned just as they were played. Although the name of the website eludes me right now I have received a couple of e-mails from them. They have gotten the thing off the ground but I believe they only have an iPad app so far and, of course, a rather limited song selection.


              I love it thanks for the post
              I was always on the Eddie side of the fence but I definitely have a place for Randy....nice pocket
              I dig all the iso tracks that have been floating around the past "few" years ( the Bonham and David Lee Roth ones especially).
              was in jr high and my (drummer) friend Monty Mitchel turned me onto Randy (and Saxon and Priest) by a mix tape.
              Randy died later that year then I moved to Atlanta a year later (where Randy's last show was) and got more into r&b/new wave

              ......dig the tracks w/out the (sloppy) doubling
              wish he'd had more clarity (less gain???) in his tone at the time (they could have "thickened" in post then). The Max Norman/ Randy doubling/tripling was probably the correct approach (obviously the final product kick our asses!). Could have used some more smack (and less "Peavey"-ish gain ) in the raw tone.....

              Great parts in orchestrating the layers ..... what an artist.
              I'm sure he would have loved Malmsteen's take on the neo classical thing
              Wouldn't have competed on that level but would have given us nuggets on another level
              ......am saddened we didn't have more of him but am thankful for what we got.

              I go through Freddie Mercury withdrawals
              and I go through Stevie Ray withdrawals
              but I don't go through Randy withdrawals
              although I revisit him every 2 or 3 years.
              I am not a fan and will not defend Randy but I WAS impacted (great riffs, great songs, solos were mini compositions ala Elliot Easton....... )
              Rudy's book did not satisfy me.
              SELLING
              ....lots of pedals and related stuff spring '17

              www.jpaulmusic.com
              www.facebook.com/jpaulmusic

              Comment


              • #8
                Randy used altec-lansing PA drivers in his Marshall. That probably accounts for his "thin" tone. But that's what he liked.
                Kickin' it in the sticks...

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                • #9
                  Wow
                  been listening the last cpl days...
                  listen to how articulate and even his phrasing is
                  (without the doubling)
                  SELLING
                  ....lots of pedals and related stuff spring '17

                  www.jpaulmusic.com
                  www.facebook.com/jpaulmusic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow
                    been listening the last cpl days...
                    listen to how articulate and even his phrasing is
                    (without the doubling)

                    What I love is his rhythm playing. Listen to some of the nuances on "Over the Mountain". He probably got that from Eddie: using the major third a lot.

                    But he went beyond that too. Eddie used to say he'd tune his B string especially to sound consonant when playing those close intervals with distortion.
                    Kickin' it in the sticks...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow
                      been listening the last cpl days...
                      listen to how articulate and even his phrasing is
                      (without the doubling)


                      He was amazingly good, helped bring the oz man out of a drunken stupor and elevate him to the position of king of hard rock leaving his Sabbath bandmates in the dust. I don't care much for that overdriven guitar sound anymore these days but I loved it then and to some extend it became the sound of 80's hair metal/hard rock.

                      That first album was one of those times I really got excited about music and guitar playing. Those moments came frequently for me back in the 70's, less so in the 80's and have been very rare since the 90's.
                      http://www.crazydeliciousband.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cool... I will check this out. I went on a big Randy Rhoads kick earlier this year and worked out some of his stuff. Zakk was the first guitarist I heard with Ozzy. Live and Loud was a pretty rocking album. Then I got into Sabbath and all that other 70s rock stuff. I didn't really check out RR until this year when I picked up the first two Ozzy albums and the Live Tribute album.

                        I agree there is something funny about Rhoads tone. I think alot of it has to do with the recording process and the producers, engineers, mics, sound board, etc, etc. All that stuff can play a huge role on the sound that ends up on tape.
                        http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Cool... I will check this out. I went on a big Randy Rhoads kick earlier this year and worked out some of his stuff. Zakk was the first guitarist I heard with Ozzy. Live and Loud was a pretty rocking album. Then I got into Sabbath and all that other 70s rock stuff. I didn't really check out RR until this year when I picked up the first two Ozzy albums and the Live Tribute album.

                          I agree there is something funny about Rhoads tone. I think alot of it has to do with the recording process and the producers, engineers, mics, sound board, etc, etc. All that stuff can play a huge role on the sound that ends up on tape.

                          Altec speakers in marshall cabs and a Distortion+ pedal.

                          With different producers, live and in studio, Randy had that sound.
                          Kickin' it in the sticks...

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