Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Adapting To No Bassist - Ideas for creating a huge sound and interesting ideas

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Adapting To No Bassist - Ideas for creating a huge sound and interesting ideas

    Hi everyone
    Long time since I've posted here - mainly because we've been very busy

    However, after a long string of situation changes, we are now a 3 piece with no bassist (1 drum/vocal, guitars and lead singer).

    We have traditionally been a heavy rock/funk outfit (sound clips here if you want more detail: http://soundcloud.com/leftajar/sets/one/).

    We now have to adapt to having no bassist - I'd like to bounce ideas around for creating a big soundscape and I'm open to anything.

    What I am currently trialing:


      I'm also very into keeping it simple (a la White Stripes) but I'd like to combine a few different ideas.
    www.leftajar.com
    www.facebook.com/leftajar

    Rig -
    Marshall Tsl 100
    Marshall Slash Signature 4x12
    Line 6 Pod HD 500

    Guitars (All Left Handed) -
    Fender JAP 52 Reissue Telecaster (With Keystones)
    Fender JAP 70's Telecaster (With Keystones)
    Fender USA 50th Anniversary Strat
    Fender JAP 62 Reissue Strat
    Fender JAP Relic'd Telecaster (With Keystones)
    Ibanez 1977 Les Paul (With Zakk Wylde EMG Pup's)
    Ibanez RG1570 (With SD Dimebucker)
    Ovation LCSE 24

  • #2
    One possible way would be for the guitarist that is more rhythm-oriented to switch to an 8-string guitar, with the lowest strings tuned to E and A. Getting a speaker cabinet that could handle the lower frequencies (perhaps a powered PA speaker) would help too. That way, you could have the best of both worlds. The low end would be there as well as the stuff you normally do on guitar.

    The octave pedal is probably the cheaper bet, but you would still need to get an amp/cab that can handle the low bass frequencies or you'll blow a speaker.

    Ultimately, if you can only afford to change one thing, buy a used bass amp and have the guitarist that will serve as the 'lower guitarist' play through that. Playing a lot more on the lower strings and changing the EQ would probably fill in most of the sonic space you would otherwise be lacking. Good luck.
    (This is my Non-Signature.)

    Comment


    • #3
      Look for a guitar subwoofer like a Rivera Los Lobottom or an ISP Vector.

      Or...

      Also, a Line 6 Vetta can do 2 amps at once: play in stereo with one side being regular guitar tone going to a conventional cab, the other a much fatter tone going to a ported cab, which I'd recommend you load with EVM-12L's so you don't rip the stock speakers to shreds. I guess Emi Delta Pro 12s or Swamp Thangs could handle it too

      Or...

      Start picking up the bass and choose among countless guitar players that are always more available than bass players.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's been a few years since I was in a bass-less band, but the problem then was one of movement, rather than of range. We didn't miss the low end as much as we wanted the rhythm and harmonic support. With this premise, you'll get more mileage out of loops, delays, and well-conceived guitar parts than you will out of pitch shifting and bigger speakers.
        Jukejoint Handmedowns (my band)

        Find our album on iTunes!

        A Month of Songs (Songwriting blog)







        Originally Posted by gennation


        Neither of us is gay or anything, it just happened.

        Comment


        • #5
          Start picking up the bass and choose among countless guitar players that are always more available than bass players.


          Ultimately, this is probably the best solution from a sonic standpoint. "Well, Joe's gone...who's gonna play bass now?" is a common situation. The Beatles had that very thing happen when Stu Sutcliffe left the band. Paul McCartney had already been filling in on bass whenever he wasn't around, plus Lennon said "Oh no, I just bought a new Rickenbacker, I couldn't" (lol) and Harrison said something similar, so it just kind of worked out that way. Paul was still one of the main singers, so he just adapted it as another rhythmic instrument. If anything, with his switch to bass, it removed the extra rhythm guitar (redundant) and his creativity on the bass improved the band sound.

          However, if the OP's band doesn't want to adapt like that, then other methods will have to be explored.
          (This is my Non-Signature.)

          Comment


          • #6
            The sound you'll get without the harmonic support of an independent bass line will be anything but huge.

            Sequence bass lines ahead of time or get a bassist.
            Kickin' it in the sticks...

            Comment


            • #7
              Are you still wanting to ply funk?
              Dillybar 13 july 2008.
              "I do not expect you to lift one of your lazy fingers to find the proof that I am right."

              Comment


              • #8
                Are you still wanting to ply funk?

                Yeah I know, right? Bass is the most important instrument in funk; how the hell is that gonna work?
                Kickin' it in the sticks...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think we deffo need to move away from funk (for obvious reasons) and we don't want another "member".

                  I did consider getting a bass amp but how would this work when I'm playing chords etc? (Or would I have to avoid them).

                  I already used some octave pedal on a few of our tracks, but I'm thinking that I don't want to become to over-reliant on it - ie our whole set is based on the pedal.

                  I might consider doing some pre-recorded stuff? (Guitar and bass)
                  www.leftajar.com
                  www.facebook.com/leftajar

                  Rig -
                  Marshall Tsl 100
                  Marshall Slash Signature 4x12
                  Line 6 Pod HD 500

                  Guitars (All Left Handed) -
                  Fender JAP 52 Reissue Telecaster (With Keystones)
                  Fender JAP 70's Telecaster (With Keystones)
                  Fender USA 50th Anniversary Strat
                  Fender JAP 62 Reissue Strat
                  Fender JAP Relic'd Telecaster (With Keystones)
                  Ibanez 1977 Les Paul (With Zakk Wylde EMG Pup's)
                  Ibanez RG1570 (With SD Dimebucker)
                  Ovation LCSE 24

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yeah I know, right? Bass is the most important instrument in funk; how the hell is that gonna work?


                    No kidding. It would sound like dogs ass.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No kidding. It would sound like dogs ass.


                      Well........

                      Listen to the sound cloud link. The guitarist kicks ass! As does the drummer. I love the idea of a guitar/drums/vox funk band. When you hear White Stripes/Black Keys/Little Hurricane live there's a common trait among the guitarists. They tend to use fat fingerings/voicings. And they tend use pedals that exaggerate the low end distortion/modulation. I sometimes go for a similar sound for recording (even when using a bass), by stacking distortion types. By either driving my OCD pedal by a nice clean boost (boss CS-2) first, then letting the output of the OCD drive the input of a tube amp, or by using fuzz pedals to drive the OCD then input stage.

                      Then rolling back the guitar tone knob and using the bass pickup.

                      The point is, as much as I love the guitar sound on your tune One, it has no girth. Girth comes from that murky intermodulation of tubes and pedals and bass pickups and rolled off guitar tone. And the player learning to alter his style a little to incorporate some low string downbeats to push that fuzz along with his mid and high syncopation that he is already doing so well.

                      This sounds like an awesome idea to me. Have fun with it.
                      __________
                      Ain't no sacrilege to call Elvis king
                      Dad is great and all but he never could sing -
                      Jesus

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Craig Anderton did a bass-less project with Public Enemy's drummer some time back -he put it up on SSS, if you want to dig for it- or maybe you could just ask him?
                        Gear: a room full of really LOUD plastic crap

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think the bottom line is that either someone has to switch to bass or you need to add a bass player.
                          "you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Bottom line for the Big Bottom, that is. But look at it this way: Does someone sitting on a stool playing an acoustic and singing, suck because they don't have a bass player? How about if they add a percussionist? Now add a few decibals and what's the big diff between that and the OP's current lineup? Is the method that big bands settled on in the 30's or so, the only viable way of making entertaining music? Good for the White Stripes and others for thinking outside the box (bass).

                            But the OP might give thought to a tuba, or a B3 player, if he is open to adding someone and no bass players are available.
                            Gear: a room full of really LOUD plastic crap

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ... Does someone sitting on a stool playing an acoustic and singing, suck because they don't have a bass player? ... But the OP might give thought to a tuba, or a B3 player, if he is open to adding someone and no bass players are available.


                              You could add bass on a electronic drum pad the drummer hits or with a keyboard of some kind.

                              The hard part is imaging the arrangement change.
                              Just-Got-Lucky
                              ----------------
                              My blogs: http://lwgat.blogspot.com/
                              My Music: http://www.fall-to-earth.com

                              Comment













                              Working...
                              X