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First set song? Third set song? - What's the difference?

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  • #31
    We usually make up sets that are longer than necessary, then delete a few on the fly.


    I usually put together setlists to fit the allotted time slot and include an "extras" list with some ballads and out-of-expected-genre tunes that I suspect we might need if the crowd isn't what we're expecting. This is probably more an issue for variety bands rather than more strict-genre bands though.
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    • #32
      We usually make up sets that are longer than necessary, then delete a few on the fly.


      ^ yup
      * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
      My cover band

      HARD WORK BEATS TALENT WHEN TALENT DOESN'T WORK HARD

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      • #33
        We do 4 sets a night with around 13 songs in each ( about 50 mins ). I always have pre-made sets but am open to the occasional audible to fit the mood of the crowd. My longtime goal has been to get a list where each set has good genreral stuff that appeals to everyone. Then have 3 "variable" spots per set where there would be 3 choices. For example classic rock, something new / modern or an oldie/ country song. That way you could tailor as needed without much hassle calling an audible. Have never quite got enough material down to get there though.
        Currently I have a small list in fine print at the bottom that has a bunch of classics that we don't currently play but have played and could be pulled out in a hurry. I find this saves time when making an adjustment on the fly.

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        • #34
          Pretty easy in my view.

          The guy that shows no situational awareness on stage is the last guy you want to listen to about what "works" and what "doesn't work".
          . Situational awareness.


          Yeah we got a lead guitarist like that..if he notices the room is slow and quiet the first set, he calls something...slow and quiet..

          Sorry I know that's not what you meant but I had to get that out there.

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          • #35
            Hit them with some of your most awesome stuff early on to make 'em sit up take notice and know that you are fabulous.
            Opening number has to get their attention. Has to make 'em think.....wow!

            At the very end of the night, hopefully they will have had such a good time and drunk enough alcohol to lose their artistic criticism ability and will be so blootered that as long as they hear a beat they can dance to it doesn't matter what you play!

            Then in the middle, give 'em a nice mix of stuff.

            I'd only do the slow, ease them into the show kind of music to open with if they are having dinner when you start.
            No dinner, no need to ease them in slowly.


            This ^^^^^^^

            There should be no "warm up/soft songs in any setlist, unless your doing a dinner set. If the song is weak and not pulling dancers, it should not be in the set to begin with. We usually give a song two, maybe three tries before jettisoning it from the stable. You have to be fair to the song though. For example, we have brickhouse in one of the sets and it never fails (for the 40 + crowd) Did a Halloween party and the crowd got younger as the night wore on. We lost the dancefloor when Brickhouse came up. The following Saturday was a wedding and the song killed. Our fault, not the song, for not reading the younger crowd and dropping it.

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            • #36
              You have to be fair to the song though. For example, we have brickhouse in one of the sets and it never fails (for the 40 + crowd) Did a Halloween party and the crowd got younger as the night wore on. We lost the dancefloor when Brickhouse came up. The following Saturday was a wedding and the song killed. Our fault, not the song, for not reading the younger crowd and dropping it.


              Lately I've been scratching my head over what to do with "American Girl". Usually a mid-first-set song for us and for a long time a sure-fire crowd-pleaser, lately it's gone from killing one gig to falling flat the next. And, for the life of me, I can't figure out what the difference is. Because unlike your BH experience, I can't attribute it to changing demographics from gig to gig. It's appear to both hit and miss with what seem to be very similar crowds.

              My current thought is it's probably just time to drop that one and replace it. I'm a bit past tired of playing it after all these years anyway. But then we'll play it and it will kill and I'll think----"hmmm, we'll let's keep it around for a couple of more shows...."
              _________________________________________________
              band websites:
              http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
              https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
              https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
              http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

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              • #37
                Lately I've been scratching my head over what to do with "American Girl". Usually a mid-first-set song for us and for a long time a sure-fire crowd-pleaser, lately it's gone from killing one gig to falling flat the next. And, for the life of me, I can't figure out what the difference is. Because unlike your BH experience, I can't attribute it to changing demographics from gig to gig. It's appear to both hit and miss with what seem to be very similar crowds.

                My current thought is it's probably just time to drop that one and replace it. I'm a bit past tired of playing it after all these years anyway. But then we'll play it and it will kill and I'll think----"hmmm, we'll let's keep it around for a couple of more shows...."


                I would keep it. Maybe rotate it in and out if you are getting tired of playing it. It is a fun song to play IMO, but then, we don't have it in our setlists. Not an easy song to pull of well either.

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                • #38
                  This ^^^^^^^

                  There should be no "warm up/soft songs in any setlist, unless your doing a dinner set. If the song is weak and not pulling dancers, it should not be in the set to begin with. We usually give a song two, maybe three tries before jettisoning it from the stable. You have to be fair to the song though. For example, we have brickhouse in one of the sets and it never fails (for the 40 + crowd) Did a Halloween party and the crowd got younger as the night wore on. We lost the dancefloor when Brickhouse came up. The following Saturday was a wedding and the song killed. Our fault, not the song, for not reading the younger crowd and dropping it.


                  I agree for the most part, but having a fairly simple song does help everyone get the ball rolling. I'm not saying it should be a bad tune, just that I don't like having the most technical song of the night hit me right off the bat.
                  "That's what the internet is for, slandering other people anonymously." -Banky Edwards

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                  • #39
                    I agree for the most part, but having a fairly simple song does help everyone get the ball rolling. I'm not saying it should be a bad tune, just that I don't like having the most technical song of the night hit me right off the bat.


                    Fairly simple means different things to different people. We usually start off with "Smooth". do you think that is a fairly simple song? Am7 to E and then the turnaround and also the chorus, not to mention the background vocals need to be there. Chordwise it is simple, but the lead needs to be spot on and so do the vocals. I am trying to think of another song we do that is "fairly simple", but really if you are covering a tune right, I just can't seem to think of a "fairly simple" song. I guess my point is, there are alot of songs that seem fairly simple, but to cover them right, vocally and instrumentally, you will find they are not as simple as you think. So, for us, fairly simple is not the criteria for deciding which song to place first in the first set. We need to capture people's attention from the get-go.

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                    • #40
                      We usually start off with "Smooth". do you think that is a fairly simple song?


                      Funny. You mentioned that "American Girl" was a song that is hard to pull off well, but that's one we rock pretty easily and pretty well. "Smooth", OTHO, was one that just never really jelled for us. In fairness, we only ever played it 3-4 times before deciding we'd rather move on to something else rather than give it the full attention it needed, but that's NOT an easy song to get right. Especially from the keys standpoint of juggling the piano, organ and brass parts all at the same time.
                      _________________________________________________
                      band websites:
                      http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
                      https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
                      https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
                      http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Funny. You mentioned that "American Girl" was a song that is hard to pull off well, but that's one we rock pretty easily and pretty well. "Smooth", OTHO, was one that just never really jelled for us. In fairness, we only ever played it 3-4 times before deciding we'd rather move on to something else rather than give it the full attention it needed, but that's NOT an easy song to get right. Especially from the keys standpoint of juggling the piano, organ and brass parts all at the same time.


                        Yeah, different bands fit different songs I guess. American Girl was tough vocally with my last band, so we dropped it like a hot potato. Always liked the song though. I need to have the vocals work first, then instruments, in order for the song to make the setlist. For Smooth, the vocals are there for us and the signature Santana licks are there and the feel is there, so it makes the setlist. I was just responding to the point of picking the "simple" songs for the first set and after thinking about it for awhile, I realized that nothing we do is "simple" really.

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                        • #42
                          Smooth is NOT an easy song, especially without all of the horn parts and percussion.
                          I have seen many bands do the song- I don't think I have ever seen a band do the song really well.
                          Sure, the lead guitar staples & vocals are pretty easy but it just always sounds to me like a karoake song whenever a band tries to do it.

                          American Girl is in our setlist and does well- I wouldn't say it kills, but definitely for the over 30 crowd it is a great cut that everyone seems to love.

                          I also find that one as one of the easier tunes to pull off Guido.

                          We actually do 4 Petty tunes (American Girl, Breakdown, Mary Jane's Last Dance, and Runnin' Down A Dream) because one of our singers really nails his voice, and they all go over very well.
                          I haven't really found anyone who doesn't like Petty hits.

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                          • #43
                            Fairly simple means different things to different people. We usually start off with "Smooth". do you think that is a fairly simple song? Am7 to E and then the turnaround and also the chorus, not to mention the background vocals need to be there. Chordwise it is simple, but the lead needs to be spot on and so do the vocals. I am trying to think of another song we do that is "fairly simple", but really if you are covering a tune right, I just can't seem to think of a "fairly simple" song. I guess my point is, there are alot of songs that seem fairly simple, but to cover them right, vocally and instrumentally, you will find they are not as simple as you think. So, for us, fairly simple is not the criteria for deciding which song to place first in the first set. We need to capture people's attention from the get-go.


                            I'm not saying the whole set has to be that way by any means. Just saying that I don't want to start off with the most technical stuff of the night. Nailing your first song is extremely important in my mind, it sets the tone for the rest of the night.
                            "That's what the internet is for, slandering other people anonymously." -Banky Edwards

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