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  • Auditioning for new band while still playing in a band....

    I currently play in a band that gigs once a month (ocassionally twice) and rehearses 2-3times a month due to work schedules. I am friends with these guys and generally have fun with them. I have found that I have to do all of the leg work and lately have been looking for a second (possibly to become the main) project.



    They guys all know that I have been interested about doing an acoustic duo and I have had some jams with other players. However, now another band has an opening that I may be interested in. I have contacted them and am willing to audition. I am not sure how to handle this with the current band. I don't think I will say anything unless something concrete comes out of the audition. I feel that I should let the new band know the entire situation before I audition so that word doesn't get out before I want it to.



    If it goes well and I end up in the other band, I was thinking of playing the 2 gigs we have booked now and tell them that I would be willing to still play with them on available dates that I may have.



    What have been your experiences in changing bands?

  • #2
    First come, first served when it comes to gigs. You all rehearse more than you gig. That sucks. I've always wound up looking for more when that happens.
    Kickin' it in the sticks...

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    • #3






      Quote Originally Posted by msmooth
      View Post

      I currently play in a band that gigs once a month (ocassionally twice) and rehearses 2-3times a month due to work schedules. I am friends with these guys and generally have fun with them. I have found that I have to do all of the leg work and lately have been looking for a second (possibly to become the main) project.



      They guys all know that I have been interested about doing an acoustic duo and I have had some jams with other players. However, now another band has an opening that I may be interested in. I have contacted them and am willing to audition. I am not sure how to handle this with the current band. I don't think I will say anything unless something concrete comes out of the audition. I feel that I should let the new band know the entire situation before I audition so that word doesn't get out before I want it to.



      If it goes well and I end up in the other band, I was thinking of playing the 2 gigs we have booked now and tell them that I would be willing to still play with them on available dates that I may have.



      What have been your experiences in changing bands?




      Hmmmmm. I would say 90 % of musicians in your shoes would just do the audition and see what happens without telling the old band. But is the politically correct way of doing it? Probably subjective.



      To avoid your bridges the possibility of going up in smoke I woud let them know you are looking into other avenues that work for your ability and mean no disrepect personally or professionally and see what happens. It could go good or bad depending on many factors.



      In the end you have to decide this for yourself.



      I would do this: new band ----> give them a call and say you want to sit down and do a jam and then discuss business so it isn't labeled an "audition" per se and by all means I think it's professional to let them know your in a already "committed" band. Tell your bandmates you are jamming with another band and wanted to let them know so they don't become whiny lil biatches cause you didn't let them know and go from there. You never know audition may occur and they suck, or you suck and they never call you back anyway so if you did tell your band you were doing an audition they don't go into "auto kick the guy out of the band mode cause he wants to play with another band and thinks he's the ****************" type scenario.





      .02.

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      • #4






        Quote Originally Posted by msmooth
        View Post

        What have been your experiences in changing bands?




        My experiences have been much like changing relationships... always messy.



        Best to end one relationship before starting another. While I have personally been in two bands at a time, it was always evident that no band wants to be told they are 2nd favorite to a different band. Keeping them equal was what worked for me, with a first-come-first-booked approach. It worked out well (and still does when I now rarely get together with the 2nd group), but there were some rough patches, especially early on.



        What you should be asking yourself is what you need that the current band can't provide, and if adding another group fills the gap and is worth the extra aggravation that will come with trying to balance both bands.
        Sig Fail

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        • #5
          Up until recent years, if I had a band, that was the only band I was in. I might have guested with another band (fill-in) here and there, but I wasn't ever in two projects simultaneously until 2005. I was in two country-rock bands that year, one fronted by a male that played acoustic guitar, fiddle and harmonica, the other fronted by a beautiful female that just sang. It worked for a while where they didn't conflict and they played completely different markets too.



          When the bands started to conflict with scheduling, I made the choice to go with the more lucrative band.



          I would go on the audition just to feel the guys out. There is no guarantee it will work out and that you'll even want to be in the band, so I wouldn't tell your current band just yet. It's obvious you are looking for something better, so if the worst case scenario happens where you lose your main band, you just look at something else. If you can somehow work it out where you can be in both bands, great! But these things are not usually so easy, especially if you are playing in the same or similar markets.
          (This is my Non-Signature.)

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          • #6
            Being that your current band ties up a total of 5 night per month (2-3 rehearsals and up to 2 gigs) - you've got 25 other nights that are yours. Unless your current band is actively engaged in efforts to change this (talking about getting more gigs doesn't count!) and as long as you plan to continue to play with them regardless of what happens with the potential new band - you are not changing anything regarding your current commitment to your existing band.



            The only thing that changes if you happen to join a second group - is that your list of "scheduling" considerations are other rehearsals and gigs. Everybody involved needs to understand that it's just a "scheduling" consideration - and no different than the drummer's not being able to make a rehearsal because he has to work late on his day gig, the bass player's not being able to accept a Saturday night gig because he's going out of town for his kid's hockey tournament, the keyboard player's not being able to rehearse on Thursday because it's his 4 year wedding anniversary, etc. The reality is that everybody working in "part time" bands have events associated with other aspects in their life that must be taken into consideration when scheduling band rehearsals and gigs.



            It also means that you may need to make sacrifices in other areas of your life. The reality is that every band member must make themselves available for band activities as much as possible. If today, you regularly "block out" a handful of dates for other non-music related events - you may have to "bite the bullet" and reduce the number of those types of "blocked out" dates are on your calendar so that your overall level of availability stays as close to the same as possible.



            If you elect to go play in multiple groups - you'll need to ensure that you treat all groups fairly. For most of us who play in multiple groups - it means booking band events on a "first come - first serve" basis. It also means that you give each band your best - i.e., ensuring you show up with songs learned and ready to play. You can never use "I was busy with my other band" as an excuse.
            The SpaceNorman

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            • #7
              nchangin and spaceNorman gave great advice....listen to it carefully.

              GtrGeorge

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              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by GtrGeorge!
                View Post

                nchangin and spaceNorman gave great advice....listen to it carefully.

                GtrGeorge




                But....you know, all the chords.
                Kickin' it in the sticks...

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                • #9






                  Quote Originally Posted by msmooth
                  View Post

                  ..... I feel that I should let the new band know the entire situation before I audition so that word doesn't get out before I want it to......




                  I worked with a guy that always did this. If he was in one band he would say, matter-of-factly, not like it was a big deal or anything, something like "I'm going over to jam with X and Y." He never tried to do anything on the sly and he seemed to be able to stay friends with everyone.

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                  • #10






                    Quote Originally Posted by New Trail
                    View Post

                    I worked with a guy that always did this. If he was in one band he would say, matter-of-factly, not like it was a big deal or anything, something like "I'm going over to jam with X and Y." He never tried to do anything on the sly and he seemed to be able to stay friends with everyone.




                    Ditto! I've always been totally opaque in telling any band I'm in about who I'm jamming with and in what capacity. I live a few minutes from my practice space and love playing with different musicians, either to jam, to gig, or start new projects.



                    It's all about balance, communication, and honesty. I've had bands that don't play enough, don't practice enough, or do either too often, and you need to figure out where you want to fit into those teams.



                    But most important, be open and be honest -- whereas as SOME people dislike "muso whores," NOBODY likes a liar.
                    Music, music, I hear music

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                    • #11
                      I would audition for the second band and not tell your first band about it until you know how the land lies with the second band. If members of your first band have previously said "no side projects" (I've often come across these people) then I wouldn't worry too much about ditching them if you have to. No one has the right to monopolise your time, especially if you having the second band won't make a blind bit of difference to your first band's schedule.
                      Do you need live drum tracks? http://www.drumtracksdirect.co.uk/

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                      • #12
                        My band doesn't think I can devote enough time to both them and my acoustic duo. I don't have a job, and drumming is easy for me. I spend all my free time practicing guitar for the duo.



                        Looking forward to more opinions on this topic.
                        http://www.stlband.com
                        http://www.youtube.com/sweepthelegband
                        http://www.facebook.com/sweepthelegband

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                        • #13
                          POST OF THE DAY!!!!!!!!





                          Originally Posted by GtrGeorge!

                          nchangin and spaceNorman gave great advice....listen to it carefully.

                          GtrGeorge

                          ..WADE

                          But....you know, all the chords.



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                          • #14
                            Yeah, but he doesn't know how to make it cry or sing..
                            --Hammond: BC, M3, Split L111, L122 / Leslie: 51, 760 / Yamaha: DGX-620, PF-85Follow my new band, Dr. Bombay! We're going to be organasmic!

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                            • #15
                              Back in the 80's, San Diego had TONS of work for a good band. By 1990... that had dried up. But during the 80's a musician didn't play in more than one band. There wasn't time enough. You had your gig and played a minimum of 5 nights a week. You didn't want another gig.



                              But in 1990, that changed. And as a result, the best players had to play in 3 or 4 bands. That way their calender was packed and the kids got fed. You were then a self sustaining entity. It was up to you to book your calender. If you burned a band, you didn't work for them again. So you didn't burn bands. And there was certainly no secret you were playing as much as you could.



                              Don't hide it. Be above board and honest. If they can't handle it... well, that sort of falls into the realm of "your issue, not mine" doesn't it?
                              __________
                              Your god doesn't exist but my god does and he is all loving. If you disagree with me I'll kill you. - Prince Ea

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