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How much of your own music do you listen to?

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  • How much of your own music do you listen to?

    This is kind of a take off on Guido's thread... when I saw the title I thought he was talking about ones own personal music that they had a hand in creating. Every since I have been making music recording options have been readily available. I was 18-19 when one of my first buddies saved up enough money to get a Tascam 4 track. Before that a guy was taking lessons with had some type of multi-track recorder. So, recording has always been an option.





    I rarely listen to anything I have played on. I am just too critical when it comes to listening to an open ear and it's more painful than anything else. I started playing with an original, instrumental band a month or two ago and we've started recording some of the songs. It helps to listen to them to get the songs down tight, but again listening for enjoyment is not there. I'm just not happy with the playing and I can't help thinking I still have a long way to go.



    Regardless of whether or not you've done recordings in a big time studio or at home on your computer... how often do you listen to your own recordings? And do you listen for enjoyment, reflection, to critic and improve, or all of the above?
    http://www.reverbnation.com/thedubiouscapture<br>

  • #2
    I'm the exact opposite.. I listen to my own recordings incessantly .. pretty much to the excusion of all else even. I've been writing a lot and working on original stuff a lot and I find that iistening back helps me fine tune the songs and my own performance.. I hear things I like and improve on the idea the next time.. I hear where my phrasing singing could be better.. Its a super tool



    But I think I'm weird about how much I listen to my own stuff.. I dont think most people are like me



    I forward the recordings to the band too

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    • #3
      I enjoy listening to my band's and my solo stuff on occasion. While I'm pretty over-critical about my performances (especially my singing) and production, there's still a lot of pride there. It's funny how you can not listen to it for a few months, put it on and totally hear it in new ways. That can happen with any music I suppose, it's just a little more surprising when it's yours.

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      • #4
        I keep a disc of my "greatest hits" in the car and a playlist on my iPhone. I haven't been listening to them much recently because I've been neglecting my music in general and it just makes me feel like an **************************** (like I could be creating but I'm not).



        I generally like my tunes...especially my bass lines.

        Brian V.
        "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt." - Bertrand Russell

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        • #5
          I listen to stuff and try to soak up all the mistakes. I think it helps me to improve over time. It's like taking a block of stone and chipping away everything that isn't the statue. For instance, I found that for some reason when I let loose on a word with a P in it, the vowel sound is always out of tune. I had to change the way I articulated certain words because I was able to figure out that P was the Problem. I have an H4 and recorded alot of gigs in the past. I usually listen to the recording one time through and then burn a CD for my mom.
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><div align="center"><font size="4">This space intentionally left blank</font></div></b></div>

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          • #6
            I rarely listen to the music my band has recorded. Mainly because I operated the recording console, so I've been there for EVERY SECOND of recording, mixing, dubbing, etc., and I really don't care to listen to it much after that.

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            • #7






              Quote Originally Posted by backtoblue
              View Post

              I enjoy listening to my band's and my solo stuff on occasion. While I'm pretty over-critical about my performances (especially my singing) and production, there's still a lot of pride there. It's funny how you can not listen to it for a few months, put it on and totally hear it in new ways. That can happen with any music I suppose, it's just a little more surprising when it's yours.




              Exactly this. I think we have good stuff. Usually I listen after I give someone a cd or link to our stuff. Like, okay, what did I just show these people again? I'm usually surprised at how good it is, especially now that we're all eager to move forward on the newer material. I forget that the debut is actually pretty darn good, despite my complaints about what we could have done differently.
              <div class="signaturecontainer">Free prog-related metal from Michigan.<br />
              <br />
              <a href="http://www.silentlapse.com" target="_blank">http://www.silentlapse.com</a></div>

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              • #8
                i don't mean to be a jerk, but i have a question for the guys who rarely or never listen to their own work:



                If YOU can't stand hearing your own music, how can you justify subjecting ANOTHER person's ears to it?



                i understand that after spending months on a project, you'd want to step away from it, but if you never reach the point where you want to step back towards it, then what was the purpose of making it?

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                • #9
                  I think some people can hear things they want to change and therefore want to 'improve' it some more. I believe a lot of musicians that record songs are like this, as many people have said as much in interviews. However, for those people, there is something called a deadline and they have to deliver something by then, even if it isn't 'perfect'. And thank goodness for that, otherwise, no one would ever hear anyone else's songs!



                  I wrote and recorded three songs and put them on myspace a few years ago. I actually have written and recorded a lot more than that, but I only put up those three. I took a listen to them the other night and I think they still hold up well, 10 years after recording and mixing them.



                  Speaking of people that re-record and re-record some more, I remember how it drives me crazy whenever people do that. I don't care for the revamped version of Motley Crue's "Home Sweet Home" because even though the lead vocal might be technically better, it's missing the vocal harmonies of the original ("My heart's like an *o-pen-book*") and the vibe is just different. But as a songwriter myself, I can see why they wanted to do it. But they shouldn't. It's done, so write and record something else now.
                  (This is my Non-Signature.)

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                  • #10
                    We're pretty good about recording gigs and rehearsals. More often than not - the recording quality is pretty marginal. We record with a little Zoom H4 on a camera tripod - stuck wherever we think we're going to get a "balanced" mix (we rarely do...). ****************ty mix aside, the recordings are good enough to hear pretty much everything and are fine for critiquing vocals, tempos, groove, etc. The recordings are not anything I'd post or share as demo material - but great for listening to what needs working on.
                    The SpaceNorman

                    www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
                    www.souldoutrocks.com

                    Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
                    Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
                    Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

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                    • #11






                      Quote Originally Posted by Yer Blues
                      View Post

                      This is kind of a take off on Guido's thread... when I saw the title I thought he was talking about ones own personal music that they had a hand in creating. Every since I have been making music recording options have been readily available. I was 18-19 when one of my first buddies saved up enough money to get a Tascam 4 track. Before that a guy was taking lessons with had some type of multi-track recorder. So, recording has always been an option.




                      I started recording with a friend back in the mid-80s when I was around 16. I was just starting out then. He had a Vesta-Fire cassette 4-track, but I think one of the tracks didn't work, so it was more like a 3-track. Fun for experimenting with ideas. I worked more with another friend's Fostex X-18 cassette 4-track around this time of the year 20 years ago. That was enlightening and fun, especially bouncing tracks. Moved into DAW recording with PG Music's PowerTracks Pro Audio back in 1999-2001 and haven't done much since. My cousin does a lot of recording and works with Cubase a lot, but I think I'm going to go the Pro Tools route instead when I start up again.








                      I rarely listen to anything I have played on. I am just too critical when it comes to listening to an open ear and it's more painful than anything else. I started playing with an original, instrumental band a month or two ago and we've started recording some of the songs. It helps to listen to them to get the songs down tight, but again listening for enjoyment is not there. I'm just not happy with the playing and I can't help thinking I still have a long way to go.



                      I'm pretty nitpicky about my stuff, so there are songs that I am proud of, but there are a lot more of them that make me cringe. I try to fix what is wrong with some of those songs, but I think a few of them are a lost cause. I often find the music is usually pretty good, but the vocal melody or the lyrics or the way I'm singing it just doesn't feel right or just gets on my nerves. Those songs stay in the 'unheard by the public' group. I might save them to collaborate with someone else in the future if I can't quite figure out what to do with them.








                      Regardless of whether or not you've done recordings in a big time studio or at home on your computer... how often do you listen to your own recordings? And do you listen for enjoyment, reflection, to critic and improve, or all of the above?



                      I used to listen to my stuff fairly often (at least a couple of times a month at least), but in the past few years I haven't been recording at all, so I haven't really listened to them too much. I will go in phases of listening for enjoyment, listening to critique and improve and just for reflection. I am happy that I am able to enjoy repeated listenings to at least *some* of what I have created.



                      About the only thing I record on a regular basis are my cover band's live shows with a Zoom Q3HD. That can be cringe-worthy in itself at times, but other times, I am pleasantly surprised at the results. Like SpaceNorman, I view it like watching footage of sports films: more as a tool of where to improve rather than something to show the world.
                      (This is my Non-Signature.)

                      Comment


                      • #12






                        Quote Originally Posted by stevesherbert
                        View Post

                        If YOU can't stand hearing your own music, how can you justify subjecting ANOTHER person's ears to it?




                        Haha - I had the same question...



                        Personally, I love going down memory lane sometimes. I'm proud of the music I've made (most of it, at least), and as a drummer I often listen to older recordings before writing new stuff to making sure I'm not falling back on my laurels -- I want each song to have new ideas and new energies.



                        "If we don't learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it" -- paraphrased proverb
                        Music, music, I hear music

                        Comment


                        • #13






                          Quote Originally Posted by Yer Blues
                          View Post

                          How much of your own music do you listen to?




                          None of it.
                          <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1"><font color="seagreen">Guitars = Chick Magnet<br />
                          Guitar Hero = Guy Magnet<br />
                          You do the math.</font></font><br />
                          <br />
                          <br />
                          <font size="1"><font color="blue">HCAG Civil Posters Society, Charter Member #002.</font></font><br />
                          <font size="1"><b>Simple music is the hardest music to play and blues is simple music. - Albert Collins</b></font></div>

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                          • #14
                            I listen to my own stuff probably 90% of the time between working on it, writing it, recording it..I work on music so much I rarely have the time or inclination to even want to listen to anything else. I'll scan the dials on commercial country radio here in Nashville, get sick and pissed and end up on Jack FM Besides i'm my favorite artist anyway.

                            Comment


                            • #15






                              Quote Originally Posted by stevesherbert
                              View Post

                              i don't mean to be a jerk, but i have a question for the guys who rarely or never listen to their own work:



                              If YOU can't stand hearing your own music, how can you justify subjecting ANOTHER person's ears to it?



                              i understand that after spending months on a project, you'd want to step away from it, but if you never reach the point where you want to step back towards it, then what was the purpose of making it?




                              I agree...All the successful songwriters I know have their demos on continuous rotation Maybe we all just love ourselves more than ya'll..I don't know...

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