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  • Bar patrons who just don't want to listen to you

    Surely we're not the only band who experiences this phenomenon...You start your first set and immediately there's a small exodus of folks out the door. And no, it's not because we're THAT bad, LOL. We also keep our sound levels appropriate for the room. And I'd like to think the amount of folks who will actually stay the whole night to listen to us is evidence that we're not complete ****************e...

    Granted, our first couple of songs are more for sound check and warm up purposes and certainly not our strongest material (no one would start with that anyway) but are there really people who are so uninterested in hearing a live band that they'll immediately grab their check and hit the door? We play mostly classic/blues rock in smaller towns outside the city (Dallas), so I chalk it up mostly to folks who probably listen to both kinds of music: country AND western .

    Still, it kind of blows my mind that some people are so close-minded as to not at least give a band a chance. Maybe it's just further evidence of the reason why live music is in decline. People are so used to hearing bands that suck that they don't bother to listen anymore? 


  • #2

    SaintJames wrote:

    People are so used to hearing bands that suck that they don't bother to listen anymore? 



    Yes, I think so.  It's been a downward spiral for years now.  

    But having said that---sometimes it's simply the result of being in a mixed-environment.   Any place that serves both food and has live music is going to have a good number of patrons who are only interested in one and not the other.   Not everybody who comes out to eat is interested in music.  Sometimes they're just hungry. 

    _________________________________________________
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    https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
    https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
    http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

    Comment


    • 1001gear
      1001gear commented
      Editing a comment

      guido61 wrote:

      SaintJames wrote:

      People are so used to hearing bands that suck that they don't bother to listen anymore? 



      Yes, I think so.  It's been a downward spiral for years now.  

      But having said that---sometimes it's simply the result of being in a mixed-environment.   Any place that serves both food and has live music is going to have a good number of patrons who are only interested in one and not the other.   Not everybody who comes out to eat is interested in music.  Sometimes they're just hungry. 


      Just a casual observer here. In my area most bands are hired for decorum. There's the dancing foo crowd but not much in the way of listeners. And there isn't a lot to like if you do pay attention. Add the noise level and that most present are just trying to hook up, you are probably lucky to be gigging at all.


  • #3

    SaintJames wrote:

    Still, it kind of blows my mind that some people are so close-minded as to not at least give a band a chance.

    Eh, I'd say you're taking it too hard. Some people simply don't want to hear a band. It has nothing to do with being close-minded, it's just that "that's not what they want."

    Heck, I LOVE live bands, but I don't always want to see them. Maybe I just want to have a few drinks out with my girl... maybe I want to catch up with friends and some beers... maybe I want to shoot some pool and hang with my brother. So if you're out in one of those scenarios and a band strikes up, well, yeah, you might want to leave.

    And before everyone goes all internet and says "you should know what venue you're at" and blah blah blah, NONE OF THAT changes the fact that not everyone wants to see a band every time they go out.

    It just happens - don't lose any skin over it and have a great gig knowing the frowny faces already left! " id="smiley" src="https://guitarcenter.i.lithium.com/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-.png" alt=":smiley:" title="Smiley Very Happy" />

    Music, music, I hear music

    Comment


    • SaintJames
      SaintJames commented
      Editing a comment

      FitchFY wrote:

      It just happens - don't lose any skin over it and have a great gig knowing the frowny faces already left! " id="smiley" src="https://guitarcenter.i.lithium.com/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-.png" alt=":smiley:" title="Smiley Very Happy" />


       

      Yeah, that's kinda my attitude about it too. My band jokes about and we give each other a look when it happens, like "and there they go..."  


  • #4

    SaintJames wrote:

    Granted, our first couple of songs are more for sound check and warm up purposes and certainly not our strongest material (no one would start with that anyway) but are there really people who are so uninterested in hearing a live band that they'll immediately grab their check and hit the door?


     

    To answer your question, yeah. The people that hit the exit when the band starts (for the most part) already had their dinner and finished their drinks, and they were headed out the door anyway.

    But I'd address your opening material, and the fact that it takes you 2 songs (??) to "sound check". We work with a full-time sound man and we're dialed in (at least loosely) within 10-15 seconds. [Our new handy-dandy Presonus StudioLive with stored settings for each room we play helps a lot with this! .png" alt=":smileywink:" title="Smiley Wink" /> ]

    And...we always open our sets (espeically the 1st one) with 2-3 strong tunes that really show off our variety. For example our last gig we opened with Everybody Talks, Play That Funky Music, and then Santeria. By the 2nd verse of our first song people were gathering on the dance floor. IMO you have a few short minutes to make a good impression or the people that are debating on sticking around are gonna be out the door pretty quick too. As a customer, if I can't hear the singer or the guitars or drums are too loud after 3/4 of a song or more...I'm already annoyed. If I was debating on leaving...well...that debate may well already be over.

    Sure, there will always be a few people that head to the exit when a band starts. But in our minds, they were DEFINITELY leaving anyway. For the record, most of the time we experience the exact opposite. Our lights are setup, the stage is ready, and people (not OUR people, just the general bar/club crowd) generally scurry to find a table or stand in the area to wait for us to start.

    Christian

    SpaceCat
    www.spacecatband.com

    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix







    Originally Posted by wheresgrant3


    Our singer is basically butchering the Grade A material into deli meat, but don't fear... the crowd is there for big sandwiches.

    Comment


    • SaintJames
      SaintJames commented
      Editing a comment

      guitarguy19 wrote:

      But I'd address your opening material, and the fact that it takes you 2 songs (??) to "sound check".

      I hear ya. Unfortunately, a sound guy AND the space required to be able to set up the mixer out front is a luxury we are rarely afforded, especially playing the local dives. (Where would the customers sit? LOL) Thus, we usually mix from the stage (aka in the corner under the TV) and need to run through a song to fine tune after a line check. I hate that it's like that, but it's a necessary evil. Thankfully, we're playing more and more better rooms that have their own system and sound guy. 


  • #5
    It happens sometimes when we play restaurants. We laugh a little to each other
    www.ostrichhat.com

    Comment


    • #6

      SaintJames wrote:

      Surely we're not the only band who experiences this phenomenon...You start your first set and immediately there's a small exodus of folks out the door.

      Other than knowing they headed for the door - I'm guessing you really don't know much about how long they had been there, why there were there in the first place, etc. I wouldn't draw any conclusions why they left. If they're leaving before you start playing - it certainly ain't because you drove 'em out! If you want to try to keep 'em - I think it was Lee Knight who suggested stopping by their table and chatting them up a little. He's dead nuts on with that advise - you won't keep all of 'em but you'll managed to have more than a few stay and at least listen to a song or two!.


      SaintJames wrote:

      Granted, our first couple of songs are more for sound check and warm up purposes and certainly not our strongest material (no one would start with that anyway)

      Be careful about that "no one would start with that anyway..." rationale. Starting with anything less than some solid "A" material is a shot in your own foot. First impressions are huge - do whatever you gotta do to make a good one. That usually means starting with something makes a statement. We've got a great male vocalist and a very solid horn section - and we collectively play the **************** out of the tune "Vehicle" (Ides of March). It's not the greatest dance number - but you can bet that there isn't a head in the room that doesn't turn with that "where the hell did that come from!" look when we kick into that intro. If you're starting with something that YOU consider to be filler material - you're doing your band a disservice. It doesn't have to be ultra current, ultra danceable, ultra anything - but you better own it - and be playing it like you mean it.

      The SpaceNorman

      www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
      www.souldoutrocks.com

      Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
      Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
      Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

      Comment


      • jeff42
        jeff42 commented
        Editing a comment

        SpaceNorman wrote:
        Be careful about that "no one would start with that anyway..." rationale. Starting with anything less than some solid "A" material is a shot in your own foot. First impressions are huge - do whatever you gotta do to make a good one. That usually means starting with something makes a statement. 

         

        This is true. Maybe start with something that isn'tas  "dancable" as your other songs but is still a good tune that is done WELL. That's makes for a great 1st set opener. 


    • #7

      SaintJames wrote:

      Surely we're not the only band who experiences this phenomenon...You start your first set and immediately there's a small exodus of folks out the door. And no, it's not because we're THAT bad, LOL. We also keep our sound levels appropriate for the room. And I'd like to think the amount of folks who will actually stay the whole night to listen to us is evidence that we're not complete ****************e...

      Granted, our first couple of songs are more for sound check and warm up purposes and certainly not our strongest material (no one would start with that anyway) but are there really people who are so uninterested in hearing a live band that they'll immediately grab their check and hit the door? We play mostly classic/blues rock in smaller towns outside the city (Dallas), so I chalk it up mostly to folks who probably listen to both kinds of music: country AND western .

      Still, it kind of blows my mind that some people are so close-minded as to not at least give a band a chance. Maybe it's just further evidence of the reason why live music is in decline. People are so used to hearing bands that suck that they don't bother to listen anymore? 


      SureI have been there. But those are the after work crowd...they are ther to unwind and bs with their buddies. Don't take it personal!

       

      We used to (after realizing what was going on) launch in to some serious rock and watch them funnel out! They are only annoyed by your music and any attempts to appease are short lived and worthless as they soon will be gone.

       

      We'd start in such situations with some good rockers/dance songs. played reasonably loud (no need to blast and be an ass) that we would play again later, to packed dance floors! This gave us a quick rehearsal/warm up for some highlight songs and got the night moving...if you catch my drift.

       

      They are just pissed that they have to go home to their wives, and you are the sounding alarm! **************** em

      Originally Posted by GW348


      I just let the pee flow. The places I play, no one notices or have peed themselves too.




      RIP Wayne Murray

      **************** YOU CANCER!!

      Comment


      • deepflight
        deepflight commented
        Editing a comment

        Not precisely the same thing, but I was out to see a friend's acoustic singer/songwriter thing at a restaurant this weekend.  There was a guy eating his dinner at a table right in front of the stage area, and he happened to be sitting so his back was to the stage.  My friend took the stage, looked at the guy, and said something like "oh, playing hard to get?" along with some other comments that he was about to start playing and that the guy should turn around an listen.  The guy moved his chair so he was to the side of the table.  But then he pretty much bolted down his food and took off as soon as possible.  At which point my friend again called attention to him and got the rest of the audience to wave goodbye.  

        Personally, I thought my friend didn't really handle it appropriately.  He kind called the guy out in front of everyone, and it was pretty clear to me that the guy just wanted to eat his dinner in peace.  I mean, true, it was a small venue, but it would have been better to have said something to the guy more privately before the show started if he couldn't handle playing to someone's back.  Or better yet, just let the guy figure out that there's something going on and move on his own.   

         


    • #8
      Around here you are likely going to be heckled by bar patrons. It's just how the bar crowd is.

      I recall my first duo gig. We went early to set up and sound check, so the bar was full of hardcore old drinkers with their attitudes. As soon as they see me putting the speakers up I hear sighs and bitching about loud music etc.. I was mortified!

      I get the, "what kind if music do you play?" And my response is, "all kinds". Then quickly hear the grumblings of "probably that rap, rock ****************".

      I sound checked with Folsom Prison Blues and all was right in the world. In fact, while we were setting up people were ready to leave. After I played a song they decided to stay and ended up having a great time. One guy even blamed us for him staying way too late because he had to work in the morning! Sometimes you have to read the crowd right away to reel em in.

      Comment


      • jeff42
        jeff42 commented
        Editing a comment

        Sick boy78 wrote:
        Around here you are likely going to be heckled by bar patrons. It's just how the bar crowd is.

        I recall my first duo gig. We went early to set up and sound check, so the bar was full of hardcore old drinkers with their attitudes. As soon as they see me putting the speakers up I hear sighs and bitching about loud music etc.. I was mortified!

        I get the, "what kind if music do you play?" And my response is, "all kinds". Then quickly hear the grumblings of "probably that rap, rock ****************".

        I sound checked with Folsom Prison Blues and all was right in the world. In fact, while we were setting up people were ready to leave. After I played a song they decided to stay and ended up having a great time. One guy even blamed us for him staying way too late because he had to work in the morning! Sometimes you have to read the crowd right away to reel em in.

        LOL sounds alot like some of our gigs! especially the "what kind of music do you play?" 


    • #9
      As others have said, you really can't take it personally, it's just one of those things that comes along with playing out...
      Originally Posted by co&cafan808


      chevybusa ****************in delivers the lulz!!!



      Using and abusing Reason 4.0 (with tons of ReFills) and Logic 9 (with tons of soft synths, VSTi's and plug-ins)
      via
      a Yamaha S80 (with 2 FC7's, an FC5, an FC3, and a BC3a) and a Behringer BCR2000
      on
      a 4GB 2.53GHz Intel Core Duo Mac Mini
      with
      AKG K77 headphones or M-Audio BX5a Deluxe monitors.







      Originally Posted by OldGuitarPlayer


      Ahhh...John Cage. The ultimate troll.









      Originally Posted by Anderton


      Just remember...machines don't kill music, people do.

      Comment


      • FitchFY
        FitchFY commented
        Editing a comment

        chevybusa wrote:
        As others have said, you really can't take it personally, it's just one of those things that comes along with playing out...

        Quote-worthy!


    • #10
      One thing you can let happen is to let them effect your show. It might sting a little when people walk away, but if you're playing for three or four hours new people will show up. I've played shows for the bartender and watched as people walked in and walked right out. And by the end of the night the place was full!

      People are fickle. Even I have walked out of bars because I didn't want to listen to live music, I just wanted to mellow out and chat.

      Comment



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