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  • garage

    I need some suggestions on reducing the amount of sound that escapes from the garage through the garage door when we jam.
    The door is a 16' x 7' and a double sided metal door that may already be insulated in the middle - I'm not sure. I have been to Lowes and picked up the flexible rubber material for sealing the crack around the door when it is closed. I'm looking for suggestions on materials to hang on the door or in front of the door that can be taken down after jammin' since the cars still have to be pulled in at night. I thought about old sleeping bags, egg crate foam, blankets , ect and was wondering had anyone else found anything that worked and was easy to install and economical. I"ve read about soundprooffing and building rooms within rooms and such - just looking for simple ideas that might work for what I'm trying to do. thanks

  • #2
    Hmmm ... old sleeping bags ... excellent idea for damping the reflected sound inside the garage. It also might help attenuate some of the sound leaving the garage, primarily in the hi-mid and high freqs.

    Bass is going to continue to be a serious problem, though.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is a really tough spec. You shouldn't mount anything permanently to the door, as this will adversely affect the weight balance of the springs. But not making a good seal will effectively eliminate any sound reduction method you employ.

      The best possible reduction in STC would be through creating a second frame inside the door, and mounting removable panels of sound dampening board. This is available at home centers in the insulation aisle....it's a brown fiberous 4x8x1/2 panel. Two of these should handle a single-car garage door, and you could make the panels on frames that can roll or hang out of the way. The most important thing is to make the frame a tight fit...air leaks = sound leaks.

      You should also determine whether this type of solution will really cut down the STC to outside....many garages are uninsulated and their walls transfer sound readily.
      .....

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      • #4
        The garage is finished on the inside and fairly well insulated I think - the outside of the front wall facing the street is also bricked and the attic space above the garage is full and I mean full of stuff like old boxes clothes, ect. As I said - most of the sound escapes through the door opening and that faces my old neighbors house which is currently for sale - I'm just trying to take care of any potential problems that might arise if some complaining, whinning, cop-calling **************************** moves in. So far all the neighbors around us have been cool and not complained, we try to finish before 110 pm on friday or saturday night, I think they can hear us if they are outside of their homes but not if they are inside - at least I hope they can't.

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        • #5
          Then my suggestion should work pretty well, and it won't cost a fortune. The downside is in the PIA factor......having to move the panels and store them.
          .....

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          • #6
            thanks - I have just got to figure out the easiest way to make it all work and still be easy to put in place and take down.

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            • #7
              I would second the "multiple rolling wall panel" idea... build frames of 2"x4" screwed together, filled with R-13 insulation, and having plywood on the back side and fiber sound board on the front. I would cover the front with drywall as well. You could put an 18" or so base on each one with four casters so that it can roll. You should use small casters if you do this so it is still close to the ground.

              I would further suggest making a trip to one of your local furniture movers (Mayflower, Global, Beekins, etc) and see if you can buy 3 or 4 funiture blankets. These are heavily padded/quilted blankets that are very dense and fairly thin. I would hang these over the panels to both reduce reflections and absorb additional sound. These two things done together will help immensely.

              Back in the day we simply used similar panels covered with carpet. They helped a lot too.
              Brother Firefingers

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              • #8
                What's the problem, dude? Can't find the volume knob on your Bonehead?

                "Say hello to the rug's topography..."

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                • #9
                  the problem is jody got a new bass amp and I no longer have quite the control over his volume as when he was going direct in to the board - you know him - he has to be able to hear himself at the expense of the mix quality and everything else in the room! - although the ole boner can definately hang with any bass amp I've heard!! hehe!

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                  • #10
                    The new bass amp might be able to be tamed from broadcasting vibrations to the neighborhood via the structure if you isolate it from coupling with any hard surfaces, like the floor. Don't put it in a corner, and don't put it up against a wall. Build a 2x4-framed "sandbox" slightly larger than the bass cab. Line the frame with a tarp before you fill it with an inch or two of sand. Put another tarp on top of the sand so is doesn't escape from the box. Put the bass cab on top of that. I know it sounds silly, but it works like a champ to decouple bass cabs from the structure.

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                    • #11
                      the bass amp also has a line out to the mixing board that feeds two ev force dual 15" subs powered on one side of a qsc 2450 - the jbl sf 15" mains are on the other side - a mackie 1400i powers 2 jbl sf 12" monitors and 2 yammie 12" monitors - and yes we could blow the roof off the ole garage if we felt like it!!

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                      • #12
                        You know, RickJ might be on to something there... Isolating the bass cab is a good idea.

                        What amp did he get?
                        "Say hello to the rug's topography..."

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                        • #13
                          I usem the 4x8 sound boards like Craigv mentioned. I just store them on the side of the garage, and when we play, I set them up in front of the door, overlapping. I think they were about $6 each. No complaints yet!

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                          • #14
                            I have the same setup as you. We set up pointed away from the garage door, and use the 4x8 sound boards like Craigv mentioned. I just store them on the side of the garage when the car is in, and when we play, I set them up in front of the door, overlapping. I think they were about $6 each.
                            The bass amp sits on plywood on 2 sandbags

                            My walls have standard fiberglass insulation. This is about as cost effective as it gets for this scenario. No complaints yet!

                            If you want REAL soundproofing, you need air space between walls, sqewed walls, thick concrete, etc. You can get carried away trying to make a garae into a recording studio. If you reach this oint, either rent rehearsal space, or invest in a real studion from the ground up (idf you have over $10-20k to spend!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have the same setup as you. We set up pointed the amps away from the garage door, and use the 4x8 sound boards like Craigv mentioned. I just store them on the side of the garage when the car is in, and when we play, I set them up in front of the door, overlapping. I think they were about $6 each at Home depot.
                              The bass amp sits on plywood on 2 sandbags so no vibration thru the floor (main problem 4 bass)
                              My walls have standard fiberglass insulation. This is about as cost effective as it gets for this scenario. No complaints yet!

                              If you want REAL soundproofing, you need air space between walls, sqewed walls, thick concrete, etc. You can get carried away trying to make a garae into a recording studio. If you reach this oint, either rent rehearsal space, or invest in a real studio from the ground up (idf you have over $10-20k to spend!

                              Comment



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