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  • Wall wart wire length extension

    Hey guys. I posted this over in the amp forum, then remembered how many folks are on this forum with technical experience. Hopefully someone will know how to solve my dilemma.

    I bought a Yamaha Magic Stomp (multi effect pedal for my guitar) last weekend and for a while (most likely) it will be the only pedal I am going to use.

    The cord on the wall wart that came with it is about 5 feet long.

    Is it possible to get longer wire (from Radio Shack) and splice into the wall wart to make an extension so that I can plug the wart into the powerstrip that feeds my amp and then run the wall wart wire with the effect loop cable to power the pedal? This would just be to eliminate having to have a power strip at my feet with the pedal.

    Anything I need to know so that I dont fry the transformer or stomp box?

    Are there commercially available adapters for warts to extend their length?

    Thanks in advance!
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  • #2
    How long? ... another 15-20 feet?

    No problem, just splice in an additional length of wire (same gauge or bigger). There is a limit but I don't think you are anywhere close to it. Just don't get your polarity switched if it's DC ... you'll be able to tell by the smoke
    Don Boomer

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    • #3
      I wouldn't worry about extending it a reasonable length. After 20 feet you might have a bit of a voltage drop, but it won't be enough to cause any problems. If you want to go more than that and be safe, move up to the next gauge of wire.

      OTOH, who says you have to use a power strip on the AC side? Why not a straight extension cord?

      Comment


      • #4
        The only hindrance to soldering in an extension is that the wire used from the transformer is very thin (22-24 gage?) Maybe a problem to a novice wire splicer.
        .
        A wall-wart transformer doesn't draw much current and is only two conductor, so instead of a heavy extension cord, just use a common household "lamp" extension cord....they're thin and light, two conductor, choice of colors and you can buy just the right length needed for only 3 bucks.
        When rigging up a pedal board or a rack, I often plug in (and tape) three wall-warts onto just one lamp cord that comes with the common triple outlet head. A cheap, compact wall-wart "power pack."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by RickJ
          I wouldn't worry about extending it a reasonable length. After 20 feet you might have a bit of a voltage drop, but it won't be enough to cause any problems. If you want to go more than that and be safe, move up to the next gauge of wire.

          OTOH, who says you have to use a power strip on the AC side? Why not a straight extension cord?


          It really is easier (and a lot less hassle) just to plug the wall wart into an extension cord and plug the extension cord into the wall. The only thing you really have to watch out for is that you don't step on the big ugly wall wart while running around on stage. Good way to break an ankle.
          Michael D. www.mdlmusic.webs.com "I'm tired of rock-and-rolling Let's get married, Honey, let's go bowling" --Martin Mull

          Comment


          • #6
            My "new to playing in a band" lack of experience causes me to miss the obvious sometimes.

            Thats what is so great about this forum.

            Guys with real experience and real knowledge willing to help.
            www.facebook.com/spiralouttooltribute

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            • #7
              I was going to recommend a generator.

              Sometimes the obvious answer is the hardest to figure out.

              True story: My dad is an engineer and has always been my "go-to" guy when it comes to any kind of technical question. When I was about 12 years old, my mom got a flat in her station wagon (remember those?). Anyway, my dad went out to the driveway to change the tire. The tire hadn't been rotated in quite a while, and the last time the wheel was put on, it was cranked down with an air hammer. The combination of corrosion and tension had frozen the lug nuts pretty good.

              My dad started trying to loosen them with the lug wrench and wasn't getting anywhere. Being a genius engineer, he went out and got a long piece of pipe to put on the wrench to get more leverage. Still no luck. He worked on that thing for at least 2 hours getting sweatier, angrier, and more profane with every passing minute. As his "helper" it was my job to monitor the activities. After we'd shot a good part of the day trying to get the wheel off, I asked him if he was turning the bolt the right direction. "Yes, Steve, I am...the @#$%ing thing is just stuck," came the reply. Then (you know what's coming, don't you?!?) he said, "Well, what the @#$%, I'll give it a try the other way, but I'm sure that's not the @#$%ing problem." One good tug in the CORRECT direction, with the help of the pipe-helper he'd put on the wrench, and the lugs started flying off the wheel.
              OS is kind of like imaginary numbers-- something theoretically useful, but who doesn't acually exist.

              Only in OS's case, instead of generating recursive fractals, it's simply that the mass of **************** which fills him is greater than the mass of a similar, hypothetical mass of **************** at 0 degrees Kelvin.

              I call this phenominon "dark ****************," and while it is useful to explain OS, dark **************** violates a number of laws we know about matter.

              -scarecrowbob, 1/6/07

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Old Steve
                I was going to recommend a generator.

                Sometimes the obvious answer is the hardest to figure out.

                True story: My dad is an engineer and has always been my "go-to" guy when it comes to any kind of technical question. When I was about 12 years old, my mom got a flat in her station wagon (remember those?). Anyway, my dad went out to the driveway to change the tire. The tire hadn't been rotated in quite a while, and the last time the wheel was put on, it was cranked down with an air hammer. The combination of corrosion and tension had frozen the lug nuts pretty good.

                My dad started trying to loosen them with the lug wrench and wasn't getting anywhere. Being a genius engineer, he went out and got a long piece of pipe to put on the wrench to get more leverage. Still no luck. He worked on that thing for at least 2 hours getting sweatier, angrier, and more profane with every passing minute. As his "helper" it was my job to monitor the activities. After we'd shot a good part of the day trying to get the wheel off, I asked him if he was turning the bolt the right direction. "Yes, Steve, I am...the @#$%ing thing is just stuck," came the reply. Then (you know what's coming, don't you?!?) he said, "Well, what the @#$%, I'll give it a try the other way, but I'm sure that's not the @#$%ing problem." One good tug in the CORRECT direction, with the help of the pipe-helper he'd put on the wrench, and the lugs started flying off the wheel.


                I had one of those cars once. I think it was a Chrysler product; the starboard lug nuts were left-hand thread. I broke a lug bolt off finding that out.
                Eschew Obfuscation.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by madjack
                  I had one of those cars once. I think it was a Chrysler product; the starboard lug nuts were left-hand thread. I broke a lug bolt off finding that out.

                  Are the new Chrysler products still made that way? What about Jeep.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by madjack


                    I had one of those cars once. I think it was a Chrysler product; the starboard lug nuts were left-hand thread. I broke a lug bolt off finding that out.


                    Seriously? I don't think it was a Chrysler...we always had either a Ford land yacht or a Chevy Caprice wagon. Then again, I was only 12 and my "helping" didn't actually involve any hands-on activity. What a dumb design, though. It would seem that they'd have to go out an manufacture special bolts and nuts for the whole thing, whereas making everything standard would reduce costs and make it easier if/when you needed replacements. Oh wait, you said Chrysler and we're talking about the pre-K Car government bailout years....nevermind.

                    My dad's a bright guy most of the time...he just has a subborn/impatient streak in him. Someday I'll tell you what happened when he dropped his keys in a 5 gallon can of gas, and decided to dump the gas into a styrofoam cooler in order to get the keys out....
                    OS is kind of like imaginary numbers-- something theoretically useful, but who doesn't acually exist.

                    Only in OS's case, instead of generating recursive fractals, it's simply that the mass of **************** which fills him is greater than the mass of a similar, hypothetical mass of **************** at 0 degrees Kelvin.

                    I call this phenominon "dark ****************," and while it is useful to explain OS, dark **************** violates a number of laws we know about matter.

                    -scarecrowbob, 1/6/07

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RickJ

                      Are the new Chrysler products still made that way? What about Jeep.


                      I don't know of any cars currently made that way. This one was from the 60s. I'd never seen one with left-hand threads before, and I've never seen one since. I don't know why they did it that way; maybe they thought it would keep the nuts tight while driving? All ten lugs on that side of the car were like that, though.
                      Eschew Obfuscation.

                      Comment









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