Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electrical Background & Sound....?

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Electrical Background & Sound....?

    Reading a few of the other threads here got me to thinking about the knowledge a good majority of you here have about electrical codes,requirements,service,etc.
    So.....what & where has some of your backgrounds come from?Did you start out in the electrical field first,take a college course independantely,learn thru on the job experience in the live sound field ,etc.
    I'm interested in what route some of you have taken to get to where you are at in the"Live Sound & Production" field in whatever area of expertice that might be.

  • #2
    I have an EE degree in analog/power and control systems design but I also had a strong interest in music during college. I have found a way to combine both interests in a way that allows me to make a good living.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

    Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

    Comment


    • #3
      EE in analog/digital/microprocessors, music/sound was a hobby, learned the trade as I progressed.
      this sig no verb

      Comment


      • #4
        EE in Digital controls and USED to be a music....errrrrr.....drummer.

        Switched to production end about 7 years ago.
        Mick- - I'm just a mixer on a rock and roll house PA system

        http://www.candm-audio.com

        Comment


        • #5
          I did woodwork A level at school and am thus qualified to hand craft secret mitred dovetails on all my loudspeaker cabinets. It also means that I am appalled at the suggestion on some discussion boards (not this one) of filling gaps with glue. I can

          Comment


          • #6
            My formal training is as an electronics technician, not to be confused with either an electrician or with an engineer. I attended a 2 1/2 year non-degree program at a school that was in the transition between being a vocational or a technical school. So, at that time, they called themselves a vocational-technical school. This was a post-secondary school.

            I've learned enough about electrical work to be dangerous, having done a lot of electrical work on my house and workshop. I learned a lot of it from a book I got from a hardware store. The book is either
            this one or one very similar to it.

            My interest in music dates back at least to age 4, 1964, and the Beatles, if not all the way back to the womb. My interest in audio dates back to age 12, when I built a home audio stereo amp from a kit and rewired a mono record player to be a stereo turntable. While I was in high-school, I was the "go-to" guy for audio-video assistance. At the same time, I was already "running sound" for a local garage band, running their four channel, 45 watt, AudioVox PA with 2, 4x10 speaker columns (no monitors).

            Comment


            • #7
              I have no formal education in electricity or sound.

              In 1963 I became involved with a community theatre and worked back stage as a lighting tech. This was not your run-of-the-mill community theatre. The Barn Theatre was building its' own building at the time I joined so I was involved with installing the new Colortran Dimmy system (one of the first LV remote control dimmer systems ever built),) along with installing pipes in the ceiling for lighting positions, hanging lights, running cables, etc.

              After 5 seasons I went to NY and shaped up for Local 1 of the IA and proceeded to work on several Broadway shows and in all of the major TV studios as a stage hand, grip and finally as apprentice electrician.

              In 1971 I became a salesman and lighting consultant for Times Square Lighting in NY and stayed there for a year and a half until landing the job as LD and TD for a bus & truck tour of Hair. When the Hair tour finished I happened to book a one nighter at a local college for an unknown new act playing in a small gym. After the show I was hired by Harry Chapin and proceeded to light his concerts until his untimely death.

              My company, Entertainment Systems Corporation was begun in 1973 and has over the last 32 years done major tours, very large (and small) installations and other events too numerous to mention.

              The largest single power distribution job we ever did was for 'Movin' on 77' at the Pocono International Raceway in PA. This 3 day monster truck and car show proved to be quite a challange.

              Our contract called for supplying power to each of the 240 concessions in the infield, power to 6 refer trailers, field and grandstand security lighting and sound, lights and PD for a concert stage. Each of the 9 garages on pit row had a 400a 3 phase service and we used every bit of it, to the point where the concert stage had to run off of a genny.

              Yep, no formal training, but I've learned a bit.
              Thanks,
              Bill Cronheim
              Entertainment Systems Corporation
              Back stage since 1965
              Equipment specialist since 1973

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Steve_B
                My formal computer programming education consisted of scribbling on punch cards with a soft pencil. Does that date me?
                Steve.

                Ha! Me too, Fortran was the poison of the day.
                -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                Comment


                • #9
                  My early education on electrical power came from a set "do-It -Yourself Encyclopedias " my dad brought home from work. When I was about age 12, he started deferring to me on home wiring projects.
                  Learned some more doing stage and TV studio lighting during high school. Associate degree and EE filled in some holes but I really learned about power during about 20 years working at an electric utility company.

                  One thing I've noticed is there a lot of electric power questions on this and similar boards. I think there are guys like me who started being interested in electricity in general and migrated into music and sound, and those who probably started as musicians and migrated into sound. I think the guys who started as musicians often don't have the basic electrical knowledge that is so useful in the power side of things.

                  (I can't believe I used "encyclopedia" twice in one day here)
                  I'm backed by the shack of a soul boss most turnin' stormin' sound o'soul

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ear Abuser

                    One thing I've noticed is there a lot of electric power questions on this and similar boards. I think there are guys like me who started being interested in electricity in general and migrated into music and sound, and those who probably started as musicians and migrated into sound. I think the guys who started as musicians often don't have the basic electrical knowledge that is so useful in the power side of things.


                    and some of use completely understand all the concepts but are completely useless when faced with a panel. i understand exactly what a 400 amp 3 phase feeder is but i cant connect cams or i will shock myself to death. to death!

                    btw i got into tech stuff through music but am a college student working on a EE.
                    Originally posted by Old Steve Ok, so you're a friggin' ninja....that'll make this all the more simple.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by agedhorse

                      Ha! Me too, Fortran was the poison of the day.


                      Hollerith cards...OH NO!!!! Nothing like finishing the stack and dropping it on the way to the lab to run it. And we had COBOL as the flavor of the day.

                      Fortran still rules where I work .....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I am a geomatics engineer. got in to sound long time ago in high school, and just can't seem to leave it. Still lots to learn about power, though.

                        Wht is this "fortran " that you speak of? it is like c++ for old people.
                        -token canadian

                        Lest we forget: double-blind tests make audiophiles look twice as stupid. CRAIG V 2007

                        Just for fun, what do you think would happen if you decided to take a nap in the fast lane of a freeway? agedhorse -2008

                        Funny, I'll bet I have a good one sitting on my shelf. agedhorse -2008

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fortran was like a very scientific and powerful form of basic.

                          I also studied Cobol, Algol and RPG-II but not very in-depth. I did do a lot of work with HP's HPL and HPGL though.

                          I do very little programming anymore, no interest.
                          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                          Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My technical training was purely sound related, not electrical, though I helped my dad on quite a few home electrical projects as a kid.

                            A decade ago I began working live production (other than a few previous gigs for my own bands). My day gig was at Opryland Theme Park, mixing 6 days/wk for Opry member, Mike Snider. My night gig was mixing most contract gigs for Opryland Productions. That's where I began working with larger audio systems. It was on local crews that I began to learn something of pigtails, single and three phase power, and jennies.

                            Which is why I keep my hands away from power as much as possible.

                            I learn what I can to protect myself and those around me. Whether I'm mixing or just crew, I don't want anyone getting hurt because of electrical on gigs.
                            That's my opinion and it oughta be yours. - Makk Trukk, WSIX, Nashville, Tn.

                            If I experience any more personal, emotional or spiritual growth I'm gonna puke. - DJP, 10/05

                            Yeah, exactly! There's some things that maybe you DON'T want to fix at the source!! - Ken/Eleven Shadows on the Castrati, 3/06


                            Ghost Train playing Shake, Rattle & Roll
                            Goofball web page featuring Sunshowers/Sparkle Shoes.
                            It's WMA format.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I learned a lot about electricity from my Grandfather, who was chief engineer of Dominion Sound Equipments Limited, a subsiduary of Northern Electric, for over 30 years.
                              I also attended a whirlwind of a 2 year electronics course at a local community college in which the teacher was retiring - he was there for 26 years and was still teaching tube theory along with programming PLCs. I am grateful to have that experience.
                              Vyizder Zomenimor Orziz Aziz Zanerz Orziz

                              Comment









                              Working...
                              X