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Drummer can't hear rhythm guitar

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  • #16
    My band sets up in a circle in a 20x20 room. Doesn't affect our live show at all.


    yea, we rehearse in a circle..we do just fine

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    • #17
      ... drummer's monitor. Should I try to mix in the vocals to that monitor as well or let the side fills (frontline monitors) take care of that? Does the drummer's monitor need to be raised or can it sit on the floor?
      Let the drummer decide what he wants in his monitor. I'd raise it if you can so that it doesn't need to be as loud and doesn't thereby raise the total "stage" volume.

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      • #18
        Your solution is a good one.

        If the drummer is hearing everything but you alright... either you have to get him more of YOU, or less of EVERYTHING ELSE.

        Simplest solution is as you suggest... moving your deluxe closer to him, or somehow "aiming" it more directly at his head.
        http://www.myspace.com/steverobertband
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        • #19
          Point your amp at him.

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          • #20
            Rhat, I think you've made a good point. But let me mention a couple things about how loud we play. It's hard to play electric blues with 5 people in a 20 X 16 room and not be too loud sometimes (even though, as mentioned above, this room really does have great acoustics). We play some quieter songs, where I play an acoustic electric, and the drummer says that he can hear me OK on those songs.

            While playing most of our songs, though, I think our sound level is about average (I've played with guys who play really loud, too, so I know what you mean). Bottom line, I think we could turn down a little, and that would probably help the drummer to hear me, but I don't think it would solve the problem.



            I have practiced alot in a small room with a 7 piece with a full horn section. We were very low volume. How do you do it. Have a drummer that knows how to bring the volume down and still play the hell out of the kit. What you sound like you have going on ,, it the 40 pounds of **************** in a 20 pound bag syndrome. You are over driving the room and have a volume war going on. Its really hard to hear whats going on when bands do that at practice. The secret to bringing down the volume and getting the mix right. A real drummer ,, not just a pounder. I do realize that great drummers are far and few between,, but if you ever work with one , you will understand whats going on at your band practice. So many times when an issue like this ends up on this board ,,, people all suggest how to solve it with more noise instead of just turning everything down. Its somthing well worth learning how to do.

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            • #21
              I have practiced alot in a small room with a 7 piece with a full horn section. We were very low volume. How do you do it. Have a drummer that knows how to bring the volume down and still play the hell out of the kit. What you sound like you have going on ,, it the 40 pounds of **************** in a 20 pound bag syndrome. You are over driving the room and have a volume war going on. Its really hard to hear whats going on when bands do that at practice. The secret to bringing down the volume and getting the mix right. A real drummer ,, not just a pounder. I do realize that great drummers are far and few between,, but if you ever work with one , you will understand whats going on at your band practice. So many times when an issue like this ends up on this board ,,, people all suggest how to solve it with more noise instead of just turning everything down. Its somthing well worth learning how to do.


              Here's a recording from last Monday's practice session (). Are we too loud?

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              • #22
                My band sets up in a circle in a 20x20 room. Doesn't affect our live show at all.

                Of course not. That's a great way to practice and be able to communicate while doing so. Maybe if you never play actual gigs it'll mess you up. Otherwise, it works great.
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                • #23
                  ). Are we too loud?



                  Wow you guys sound great ,,,,How did you record it? You might turn up the bass player a touch. the balance is good. You sure dont want to turn up the rhythm guitar. You might want to try to brighten up the rhythm just a tad to get it out of the way of the bass. I think I hear what the drummer is talking about. The bass and the rhythm seem to cancel each out out if that makes sence? I think its a matter of not enough tone spread between the bass and the rhythm. All the playing is tasty stuff. Make subtle changes and record and see what it sounds like and see what kind of feedback you get from the drummer. You guys are pretty dialed in ,, but you might tweek it a smidge. This is just a wild ass guess. I bet he isnt hearing the bass, more than he isnt hearing the rhythm. good stuff

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                  • #24
                    From listening to the recording, which sounds damn good for a practice.... I would lower a little of the mids on the bass. Then lower a little of the bass on the guitar, and make it just a touch brighter. That should help seperate the two from trying to occupy the same low mid/low freq. range. Try this WITHOUT changing the overall volume of the amps themselves and see how it changes the mix and how well each thing is defined.

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                    • #25
                      Your drummer should be cuing off from the bass player not the rhythm guitar player.
                      Just saying our drummer has a little bit of lead and rhythm guitar in his wedge and whole lot of my bass in there.

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                      • #26
                        Wow you guys sound great ,,,,How did you record it? You might turn up the bass player a touch. the balance is good. You sure dont want to turn up the rhythm guitar. You might want to try to brighten up the rhythm just a tad to get it out of the way of the bass. I think I hear what the drummer is talking about. The bass and the rhythm seem to cancel each out out if that makes sence? I think its a matter of not enough tone spread between the bass and the rhythm. All the playing is tasty stuff. Make subtle changes and record and see what it sounds like and see what kind of feedback you get from the drummer. You guys are pretty dialed in ,, but you might tweek it a smidge. This is just a wild ass guess. I bet he isnt hearing the bass, more than he isnt hearing the rhythm. good stuff


                        That was recorded with a Zoom H2 portable recorder (set to 2 ch surround). That little thing does a nice job. Thanks for the tips and to everyone else as well.

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                        • #27
                          ). Are we too loud?

                          aw man, incredible stuff. love it!

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