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Upgrade path from Mackie 808S & 2 Peavey SP5

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  • #31
    Well aren't "program ratings" pretty meaningless anyway. Just give me RMS ratings any day. If amps are rated RMS then why don't the speaker manufacturers just give us RMS ratings? Would make it pretty easy for everyone to match speaker and amp.


    + 1000

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    • #32
      The "it's " in the sentence refers to the speaker. The speaker has a program rating of 500W. You match that to an amp that has a 500W continuous rating.

      So what the manufacturer is saying is that using their suggestion they expect you will be DELIVERING between 50 and 200W of continuous power to the speaker that they are rating at 250W continuous when you connect an amp rated 2X the continuous power. Nothing deceptive here.

      You just have to understand what the spec means and not go off defining it any way you want. There are some other restrictions according to the method they spec the continuous power rating of the speaker that you must observe for the spec to be met.
      Don Boomer

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      • #33
        While I know RMS is really a voltage rating as opposed to a wattage rating. So the term 500 watts RMS is technically incorrect. This is the terminology that has been used since I have been playing around with amps of all kinds. Since the early 70's basically. So my point is they can call it what they want (RMS,continuous, whatever), but it seems they could come up with one standard and quit all this foolishness.
        HC Geezer Brigade Trooper #51

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        • #34
          it seems they could come up with one standard and quit all this foolishness.


          What is foolish? It's quite spelled out
          Don Boomer

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          • #35
            Actually RMS Watts in technically incorrect anyway. The correct term is "continuous Watts"

            The reason speaker manufacturers specify "program" power is because you cannot drive a power amplifier to full continuous power using music as the source.

            Here's what is really happening when you hook a 250 w continuous speaker up to it's program rated amp of 500 w. At the time you first fire the clip lights (any usually fire the limiter) you are actually delivering about 50 continuous watts. Even with very highly compressed material it is unlikely that you could ever actually deliver 150-200 continuous watts to that speaker.

            Second thing ... all "continuous/rms ratings are not the same amount of power anyway. In this case the power is specified at 1 kHz. It would be typical that the power possible at 40 Hz from the same amp would likely fall of by at least 20%


            So does this mean I can play my 100 Marshal through one 25 watt (100 watt peak) greenback. Sure for a minute or two until I let the magic smoke out.oke:
            HC Geezer Brigade Trooper #51

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            • #36
              no idea ... live sound gear has very different specs than musical instrument gear.

              In any event you are not even following the recommendation and it seems like you have not quite yet understood the limitations.

              I recommend reading:

              http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/poweramps/HOW_MUCH_POWER.pdf

              http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/concepts/THE_LOUDSPEAKER_SPEC_SHEET_GAME_2005.pdf
              Don Boomer

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              • #37
                What is foolish? It's quite spelled out


                I'm not trying to argue with you Don, but the foolishness is when people who are new players see a speaker that is 250 continuous/500program/1000 peak and think they can safely run a 1000 watt RMS amp into it. I'm not talking experienced sound men who now how to safely do something like this. I'm talking noobies. I see it is a way for speaker manufacturer to try to say their speakers are something they are not. We would all be better off if they just listed speakers as RMS, continuous or whatever as long as the standard is the same.
                HC Geezer Brigade Trooper #51

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                • #38
                  no idea ... live sound gear has very different specs than musical instrument gear.

                  In any event you are not even following the recommendation and it seems like you have not quite yet understood the limitations.

                  I recommend reading:

                  http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/poweramps/HOW_MUCH_POWER.pdf

                  http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/concepts/THE_LOUDSPEAKER_SPEC_SHEET_GAME_2005.pdf


                  I read those quite a while ago. Thanks for posting for others to see. I guess I am just an old conservative fart myself. I won't power a speaker with an amp too much over RMS rating myself. And usually less. I use an 80 watt speaker for my 10 watt High Octane guitar amp. Buying new drivers is not my idea of fun. Also I tend to have to run sound from the stage so I tend to be more careful since I can't really hear when there is a problem out front..
                  HC Geezer Brigade Trooper #51

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                  • #39
                    the foolishness is when people who are new players see a speaker that is 250 continuous/500program/1000 peak and think they can safely run a 1000 watt RMS amp into it


                    I didn't see any reference to this in the thread.

                    I saw SP5's into an 808 - no problem and into a GX5 - no problem

                    For the record ... you can run a 1000W amp into a 250W speaker with no problems if the amp has a limiter if you are running music as the source and the specs are real and qualified. That would not be the case if you were running test tones ... but there's very little audience for that
                    Don Boomer

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                    • #40
                      I didn't see any reference to this in the thread.

                      I saw SP5's into an 808 - no problem and into a GX5 - no problem

                      For the record ... you can run a 1000W amp into a 250W speaker with no problems if the amp has a limiter if you are running music as the source and the specs are real and qualified. That would not be the case if you were running test tones ... but there's very little audience for that


                      I know an experienced sound man with his limiters on, HPF on and all his other goodies can do it, but I was referring to the noobie who doesn't know any better.

                      Since you were at Peavey can you tell me why the SP5 has a 400 RMS rating when the 15" Scorpion is rated at 200-250 RMS?
                      HC Geezer Brigade Trooper #51

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                      • #41
                        Because one is a speaker system rating and the other is for the speaker only.

                        The ratings are noise based not single frequency based so when you send full range pink noise at 400W to the input jack you only get about 200 at the woofer.
                        Don Boomer

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