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  • how do you EQ a electric guitar....

    at church i play alot. and when i dont i hear the electric guitar it sounds really whiny and compressed and sick. bad=sick....

    we have 4 18 subs on the celing pointing down and 2 15 with horns pointing down as well.

    i know the guitars orriginal tone is verry good. i have done much ear training with tone so i know the source is good. but it does not translate well to the mains... and we do use the norm 57s i think. or is it a 58.... gosh numbers.. :P
    Revival is coming

    Proud Gretsch supporter.
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    Always looking for good pedals -$150. pm me.
    I am all about pro. no junk. thats the way i play.

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  • #2
    oh ya i forgot i need pro advice. i have already asked non sound guys that think they know how. but they dont....
    Revival is coming

    Proud Gretsch supporter.
    Proud Ampeg supporter.

    Always looking for good pedals -$150. pm me.
    I am all about pro. no junk. thats the way i play.

    "A flat, Z flat, Whatever, I just rock out!"

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    • #3
      How does it sound without the PA, just the guitar amp, while listening out in the house? Just to get a feel for if it's something that the room itself is having trouble with or if it's with the PA itself.

      Generally, I start all of my PA's with a known flat response, no compression, no effects, no channel eq. Then, I will bring up the guitar and listen before doing anything. On a good, flat PA, a little channel eq is generally all that's required. A 57 should sound fine, maybe try an E-609 or something like that but you should be quite close with a 57 IME.

      If there's something wrong with the PA or the room acoustics, that will need to be fixed before you are likely to have success with the guitar (and everything else too).
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

      Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

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      • #4
        i know the guitars orriginal tone is verry good. i have done much ear training with tone so i know the source is good. but it does not translate well to the mains... and we do use the norm 57s i think. or is it a 58.... gosh numbers.. :P


        What?
        YMMV.

        Release your inner DJ... then you will begin to see.

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        • #5
          depends how the PA sounds, what the soundman is doing on that guitar channel, and what the rest of the band might be doing sonically to the guitar mix when combined. I'd say the mic, although important, has less to do with the tone. A good mixer, with a good tone coming from the amp, can make it sound sweet.

          now, just because you think your tone is fantastic to your ears, that doesn't mean the mic does..Mic positioning has a little to do with it. if the 57 isn't working, chances are it's probably your tone isn't as amazing as you think or the above mentioned stuff.

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          • #6
            Let us know what mains you are using too. A 57 (or 58 for that matter) mic on a good gtr rig into a decent PA will require little to no eq.
            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Full-Steam/179028619290

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            • #7
              Again, does your PA sound good in general? What is it? If it's the cheapest PA money can buy, then you're probably plain out of luck.

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              • #8
                How does it sound without the PA, just the guitar amp, while listening out in the house? Just to get a feel for if it's something that the room itself is having trouble with or if it's with the PA itself.

                Generally, I start all of my PA's with a known flat response, no compression, no effects, no channel eq. Then, I will bring up the guitar and listen before doing anything. On a good, flat PA, a little channel eq is generally all that's required. A 57 should sound fine, maybe try an E-609 or something like that but you should be quite close with a 57 IME.

                If there's something wrong with the PA or the room acoustics, that will need to be fixed before you are likely to have success with the guitar (and everything else too).




                the amp without being in the mix sound small and faint... the sound guys make us turn our amps around and make us turn down to like really soft. so without being in the main mix. :P our room has some eco problems to a small extent... but nothing major. our system sounds faint all the time tho... could it be the speakers? cus everything pretty much sounds muddy and dim. and like there is no power behind the mix... i dunno. thanks for the advice tho.
                Revival is coming

                Proud Gretsch supporter.
                Proud Ampeg supporter.

                Always looking for good pedals -$150. pm me.
                I am all about pro. no junk. thats the way i play.

                "A flat, Z flat, Whatever, I just rock out!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Again, does your PA sound good in general? What is it? If it's the cheapest PA money can buy, then you're probably plain out of luck.


                  Actually the speakers are supposibly from england. So they are verry expensive. but not that great sounding in my oppinion. a large soundcraft mixer. i think... soundcraft... hmmm
                  Revival is coming

                  Proud Gretsch supporter.
                  Proud Ampeg supporter.

                  Always looking for good pedals -$150. pm me.
                  I am all about pro. no junk. thats the way i play.

                  "A flat, Z flat, Whatever, I just rock out!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    if your PA speakers are pointing straight down that will sound faint and thin. eq will not help.
                    band status - "its complicated"

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                    • #11
                      Sounds like you have the mic pointing at the center of the speaker. Put the mic up against the grille, perpendicular to the baffle, and point it at a spot maybe one or two inches from the edge of the speaker. You'll get a much more natural sound with the mic pointing near the edge of the speaker than you would pointing it right at the middle... or the "ice pick zone".

                      A quality mic that's positioned properly on a good sounding guitar amp should not need EQ, or much of it anyways. maybe some low end cut and some light boost at 1k but that's it.

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                      • #12
                        I have a feeling that the guitars might have the mids scooped out at the amp if they already sound thin before even going through the PA.

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                        • #13
                          Oooooh, it's from England and it's expensive, therefore it must be good?

                          England has a history (or a culture) of making some of the worst electronics and other things too. Maybe you got some of their less than outstanding attempts?

                          Really need more information regarding the PA. I suspect that you have multiple issues.
                          -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

                          Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If it sounds faint and thin to begin with - being a church (which is my sound engineering background) the first thing that comes to mind is "are the sound people just deliberately turning it down".

                            How much do you know about what is going on at mix level?

                            And secondly, as has already been alluded to, is the system possibly just underpowered?

                            What does it sound like when you play a CD?

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                            • #15
                              and like there is no power behind the mix... i dunno. thanks for the advice tho.


                              Obviously I'm missing something. If your system sounds "muddy and dim", why would the guitars fare any better?

                              It would seem that if you fixed your system, you wouldn't need to fix your guitars - maybe they're just fine.

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