Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Behringer Xenyx X2442USB & Harbinger APS15 configuration/setup

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse







X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Behringer Xenyx X2442USB & Harbinger APS15 configuration/setup

    Hi, all. I recently purchased a PA package that includes the Behringer Xenyx X2442USB mixer and 2 Harbinger APS15 Speakers w/stands and cables. I also have two AKG D5 Mics. I'm in an electronic rap-rock band, and we're having some issues with our current configuration involving feedback. I was wondering if you could offer any advice about how to set-up and configure this PA system to reduce feedback.

    I currently have the two D5 mics plugged into the first two XLR input channels of the Xenyx. I also have electronic beats running into the line input of the third channel from an mp3 player. I have the mixer volume sliders for both vocals at around the zero mark of the mixer, and the beats are at around 5. I have the main volume slider at around zero. I have the left and right main outputs of this mixer plugged into the XLR line inputs of the two Harbinger speakers, with the line gain and main output gain at about 50%. I'm receiving a bit of feedback. It's possible that I'm driving the mixer too much, and need to turn that down and the Speakers themselves up, but I'm not sure. Is it also possible that I should plug the outputs from the mixer into the Speakers mic inputs instead of line? I'm completely new to mixer set-up. Any advice you can offer would be much appreciated. Thank you for your time.

  • #2
    Where to start...

    You need to plug into the line ins on the speakers from the board. Without getting too deep into it, your style of music requires subs. Without them, you are probably going to blow up what you have and you will never be satisfied with the sound.

    Do some studying up on gain structure. There is an awesome Guide for Goobers on the main Live Sound page that has great information that everybody using live gear should know.

    You have probably already realized that when you go into live gear purchases and cheap costs are your main concern, you get what you pay for.

    Are you using any outboard EQ? If it is feedback problems you need to solve, a good EQ will help a lot.

    Mic into board into speakers is as good as you are going to get with that gear. Try not to stay in limiting for long periods of time and start saving your money for better quality replacement gear.

    Keep a thick skin because you might get some brutally honest reviews of your new system. People here really want to help but you might not like some of what they have to say.

    Good luck and welcome to the forum.
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><b><font size="2">&quot;The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.&quot;</font></b> - <i>Hunter S. Thompson</i><br />
    <br />
    Band promo shots on railroad tracks were cool in 1981...<img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/facepalm.gif" border="0" alt="" title="facepalm" class="inlineimg" /></div>

    Comment


    • #3
      Feedback occurs when the mic is picking up the signal that's already coming out of the speakers. The most important issue to pay attention to is having the microphone "out of the line of fire" of the speakers. In other words, you should be behind the speakers. If you are positioned behind the speakers and are still feeding back, you have to turn down. Using an eq simply gives you the option of turning down only the frequencies that are actually feeding back, but it's still all about turning down.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi, all. I recently purchased a PA package that includes the Behringer Xenyx X2442USB mixer and 2 Harbinger APS15 Speakers w/stands and cables. I also have two AKG D5 Mics. I'm in an electronic rap-rock band, and we're having some issues with our current configuration involving feedback. I was wondering if you could offer any advice about how to set-up and configure this PA system to reduce feedback.

        I currently have the two D5 mics plugged into the first two XLR input channels of the Xenyx. I also have electronic beats running into the line input of the third channel from an mp3 player. I have the mixer volume sliders for both vocals at around the zero mark of the mixer, and the beats are at around 5. I have the main volume slider at around zero. I have the left and right main outputs of this mixer plugged into the XLR line inputs of the two Harbinger speakers, with the line gain and main output gain at about 50%. I'm receiving a bit of feedback. It's possible that I'm driving the mixer too much, and need to turn that down and the Speakers themselves up, but I'm not sure. Is it also possible that I should plug the outputs from the mixer into the Speakers mic inputs instead of line? I'm completely new to mixer set-up. Any advice you can offer would be much appreciated. Thank you for your time.


        Don't plug into the mic inputs, there will be WAY too much gain.

        Feedback occurs when you create a feedback loop. The signal from your mic goes to the board, your board sends the signal to the speakers which send the signal to your "audience". If the conditions are right, well actually wrong, your mic will pic up the signal from the speakers and amplify that which..... you get the picture, now the speakers are amplifying the same sound that the mic is sending them... and presto feedback.

        In simple terms you need to turn your mics down, and/or get the mics further away from your speakers, and/or get a graphic EQ to remove the problem frequencies, and/or use your channel EQ to find the problem frequencies, and/or get mics that have better GBF (gain before feedback), and/or imporve the acoustic properties of your room, and/or turn the band down so you don't have to have the vocal mics so loud.

        that's a start anyway.

        BTW gain is gain. Feedback doesn't care where you turn up or down, so turning one thing down and turning another up might help with signal to noise ratio but it won't change feeback issues.

        Comment


        • #5
          Wow. I really appreciate all the responses. My PA setup is definitely a budget setup that my bandmate and I decided to buy so we could practice effectively and play small gigs/house shows, etc. We aren't currently using an equalizer, just mics/beats>mixer>speakers. Thanks for the descriptions of gain/feedback and placement. I think the placement of my speakers is definitely in need of an adjustment. We're rocking out with the speakers behind us, which, as I now understand, is a giant mistake. I'll move the speakers to the front of our space instead, and leave my guitar amplifier and the mixer near the back of the space. I haven't even considered the possibilities involved in mic'ing my guitar amplifier. We may be in need of some monitors, if we're going to have the speakers in front of us facing outward. Anyway, thanks again. I really appreciate it. I will continue to fiddle around with the gear and try to implement what I've learned here.

          Edit: I didn't think about trying to edit the individual EQ settings for the channels on the mixer. I may have to try this as well.

          Edit 2: Just watched a gain structure video. It was very helpful.

          Comment

          Working...
          X