Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to recreate your practice room tone live?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to recreate your practice room tone live?

    I have an AC15 and I can get great tones out of it - when I play live it doesn't seem to happen. Is it bc of the sound guy or is it me? What should I ask him/her? How do I check?

  • #2
    We're missing a lot of information here... is it safe to assume that you're miced? Are you listening to it in FOH or a monitor? Different sound guys? What sort of PA's? etc, etc. Could be a million different things.

    One common problem guitarists will run into is that they spend most of their life listening to their amps while it is pointed at their shins... then you stick a mic on in and you hear what it ACTUALLY sounds like for the first time. This may or may not be what's going on here.
    "A performer without techs is standing naked, on a dark stage, and no one can hear them. A tech without a performer... has marketable skills."

    Comment


    • #3
      The tone you get in the bedroom is completely irrelevant than the tones you get when the amp is at gig volume and the rest of the band is playing.

      So, don't worry about getting "your tone" on stage, because it's never going to happen. Work at a tone that sounds good with the band, and run with it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have an AC15 and I can get great tones out of it - when I play live it doesn't seem to happen. Is it bc of the sound guy or is it me? What should I ask him/her? How do I check?


        It's always the soundguy.

        MG
        "Thank You, NASA!"

        Comment


        • #5
          When you raise your volume to gig levels your tone will change. The highs and mids do not go up in proportion to the bass levels. Try tweeking the high ends and you may get closer to the tone you play at home. The room has a huge effect on tone too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Only real way to be consistent is by using an emulator and play direct through the PA in practice and at gigs. The size and shape of the room amount other things has a lot to do with the sound you create. All you can do is get the best sound you can through FOH and use those same settings for rehearsals.
            "The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." - Hunter S. Thompson

            Band promo shots on railroad tracks were cool in 1981...

            Comment


            • #7
              The best way to recreate practice room tone is stay in the practice room. Live, the best way to get good tone is to change it based on what you hear in the room through the PA, just like we have to do for the PA in general. There is no magic bullet. It is trial and error. As others said, the tone will change constantly from room to room and PA to PA depending on so many factors there is no single answer to this. It is always a work in progress.

              Comment


              • #8
                and generally - turn down

                Comment


                • #9
                  Turn up your mids.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Don't worry, people only care about the singer anyway.

                    PA Unity15's over LS800p's. YX15's, YX12's IPR power, RM32AI

                    LightsMartin Minimac Profiles, Chauvet Intimidator Spot Duos, Blizzard 3NX, Fab5, Hotbox

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      you're just going to have to mess with your EQ.... every room is different... how your amp sounds in a small room and big room on the same settings can be night and day.... some rooms are dead... some are lively... it just is a matter of learning your amp IMO...
                      Member of the SG Army

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Another major variable often missed in this kind of discusion, especially with combo amps, is the hieght of your amp off the floor. Local reflections (i.e. what the mic picks up) can have a HUGE effect on the tone.
                        Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment. -Will Rogershttp://facebook.com/SpitShineRocks

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Another major variable often missed in this kind of discusion, especially with combo amps, is the hieght of your amp off the floor. Local reflections (i.e. what the mic picks up) can have a HUGE effect on the tone.


                          Or stand up and away from your amp when you practice so you'll hear what your amp is trying to do when you gig.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Or stand up and away from your amp when you practice so you'll hear what your amp is trying to do when you gig.


                            Not "or", "and".

                            Hearing what is coming directly out of your speaker is probably this biggest thing missed. Point the amp at your head, and adjust your tone at stage volume levels. (as already stated) But even if you do this, the sound at the speaker will be different than the sound at your ears a few feet away (even when pointed right at your head). And the mic is at the speaker, not at your ears.

                            An amp sitting on the floor aimed up at your head will sound much darker (i.e. more low freq.) through a microphone than that same amp will sound if it is on a stand and mic'ed.
                            Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment. -Will Rogershttp://facebook.com/SpitShineRocks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It doesn't matter what it sounds like comming out of the amp, only what it sounds like coming out of the PA.

                              As others have stated, keep your volume low (low to most guitar players is still way too loud ..... and I am a guitar player btw).

                              Get a good guitar microphone (I like the Sennheiser e609 and e906 first, or an SM57). Set your amp to the volume and tone you are going to play at and don't touch it after that. Use the mixer channel strip to get as pleasing a tone as you can create through the FOH. It is better if you do this with your amp actually turned around and facing the wall to ensure you are getting just the PA and not the amp sound out front. Make sure you have plenty of room before clip on your gain on the channel so that when you boost for leads, you don't clip the crap out of the channel.

                              Hope this helps!
                              With Greater Knowledge Comes Greater Understanding

                              Comment



                              Working...
                              X