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How do you describe 'WARM SOUND' in your own words?

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  • How do you describe 'WARM SOUND' in your own words?

    I have no idea how to explain what "WARM' sound is in ENglish. Think Vinyl, Tape, Analog 'warm' sound.

    I know my English is at best mediocre compared to you folks...so please teach me.

    How do you describe 'WARM SOUND' in your own words?

  • #2
    Most of the examples given would to me indicate a bit of distortion coupled with a rolloff of high frequency.

    And that kind of falls in line with the sound I generally associate with what people mean with the adjective "warm"
    -

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    • #3
      A warm sound is usually more biased towards the low and lower mid frequencies as opposed to a bright, treblely sound.

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      • #4
        Clean, easy to listen to sound, not harsh or too heavily weighted in any frequency range. Bottom end must be clean.
        Engineering Axiom 21: Whomever has the key should be qualified.

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        • #5
          Using he term "warm" to describe sound began as a way to describe the sound after the power tubes heated up. Slightly compressed, with mild high frequency distortion, and a sagging low end.
          Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment. -Will Rogershttp://facebook.com/SpitShineRocks

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          • #6
            and a sagging low end.


            Now define "sagging low end".
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            • #7
              Now define "sagging low end".


              Sag is distortion & compression caused by slow/undersized power. That's actually pretty easy to create electronically.
              -

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              • #8
                Now define "sagging low end".


                As we get older, everything gets larger, heavier, and closer to the ground.
                Security Officers have been trained to not touch the service monkey

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                • #9
                  To me, the entire description process is in the mind of the user rather than anything technically accurate.
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                  • #10
                    Tanya:

                    I'm of the impression that preference in the sound of music stuff varies over the globe... folks get accustomed to their local dialect of musical sounds, and that

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                    • #11
                      thx to all of you who posted here. I love hearing how you folks creatively describe 'warmth' in your own words.

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                      • #12
                        Warm sound a slogan invented by marketing folks to make their product sell. With slogans such adds rich analog warmth to your sound with our __________ product only for $$$$$$$$$

                        I think SRV would sound like SRV on a $100 amp as well as a $1000 amp just the $1000 amp probably uses real tubes and not tube shaped light bulbs passed off as tubes.

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                        • #13
                          I see warm as a descriptor of the old analog, lp sound. Things were more "mixed" sounding. Digital often sounds to me like you have a drummer in Oklahoma, a guitarist in Texas, A bass player in Georgia, and keyboardist in New York, and they are playing together by using earphones. They can still be tight, and the music can be excellent, but the analog sound feels more like those same guys in someone's living room playing together, and you are listening on the couch.

                          Digital is a bit too clear and crispy for me.

                          And yes, analog can sometimes be a bit low-end muddy.

                          Carlos Santana did a cd that covered a lot of classic rock songs starting back in the late 60's. His arrangements and guitar, of course, was great, but the first thing I noticed was that uber-clean, crisp sound and feel. I couldn't help but compare it to the original sound that was analog. Sometimes his version, IMHO, was superior to the original, but the sound......well......it just wasn't that warm analogy feel.

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                          • #14
                            I look at it two ways;

                            1. Smooth mellow tone, devoid of harshness and distortion; and

                            2. Within the context of your original question, (your reference to "tape, vinyl, etc"), the absence of noticeable digital-sampling artifacts and the impact of inadequate filtering. (Nyquist frequency), which can contribute to that sense of "brittleness". I've only ever noticed this effect in cheaper consumer-grade products from the 80's,90's, where it was common to see a single DAC(digital to analogue converter) being used for both channels (stereo left and right) for cost-cutting reasons. Also, cheap "brickwall-filtering", combined with a too-low(IMO) sampling-rate (44/1Khz). I noticed a BIG difference with the DAT standard of 48 Khz sampling and digital filtering, as well as the use of twin DAC's (one per channel/ left and right). Raising the sampling rate to 48KHz from 44.1Khz, "moved" the Nyquist frequency from 22KHz, to 24Khz, which was well out of the range of human hearing.
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                            • #15
                              "Warmth" might be whatever noise it is that this adds to your recording??

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