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Non XLR Connections Inside Rack

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  • Non XLR Connections Inside Rack

    My keyboard rack - which contains a Samson SM10 Line Mixer, a Motif ES Rack unit, a MOTU MIDIExpressXT Midi interface, an ART Isolation Transformer, etc. All of these devices use either 1/4" TR/TRS connectors or 5 pin MIDI connectors. There's a small rack mount power strip mounted on the rear rails of the rack. In part for "protection" and in part for aesthetics - the top 4u (it's a 6u rack) of open rack space on the rear of the rack are covered with blanks.

    Unfortunately, it seems like once every month of so (and always at the most inopportune time!) - I have to pull the blanks covering the back of the rack and reseat one or more of the connections. Unlike XLR and/or Speakon connectors that have a locking mechanism - some of the 1/4" and 5 pin DIN connectors are always jiggling half loose in the course of regular transport of the rack.

    I'm hoping for a few suggestions on ways to secure "straight connectors" in jacks that prone to coming loose. Any ideas?
    The SpaceNorman

    www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
    www.souldoutrocks.com

    Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
    Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
    Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

  • #2

    I'm hoping for a few suggestions on ways to secure "straight connectors" in jacks that prone to coming loose. Any ideas?

    Equip your patch cables with these:

    http://www.switchcraft.com/productsummary.aspx?Parent=79

    Comment


    • #3
      You could also replace the blanks with one of these.

      http://www.fullcompass.com/product/274057.html
      <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1">Security Officers have been trained to not touch the service monkey<br />
      </font></div>

      Comment


      • #4
        Would blanking off the back cause heat issues?
        NO SIGNATURE FOR YOU!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Custom wire looms. Cables wiggle loose less when they're all zip tied together.

          -Dan.
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><i>Well, I've been to one world fair, a picnic, and a rodeo, and that's the stupidest thing I ever heard come over a set of earphones.</i></div>

          Comment


          • #6
            Use zip ties and tie the to something inside to provide some strain relief
            <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.rock-bot.com" target="_blank">www.rock-bot.com</a><br />
            Live-Band-Karaoke<br />
            <br />
            bassist and sound reinforcement</div>

            Comment


            • #7
              I've done plenty of these connections inside racks and with proper harnesses and strain relief loops I haven't ever had any problems. IEC power connections are a different story however.

              Comment


              • #8
                IEC power connections are a different story however.
                A wad of the correct gauge of paper(or cardboard) as a wedge deftly applied seems to generally do the job... but I agree... the IEC's are a problematic connector sometimes.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A wad of the correct gauge of paper(or cardboard) as a wedge deftly applied seems to generally do the job... but I agree... the IEC's are a problematic connector sometimes.


                  The biggest problem is with the heavier gauge cables on the power amps.

                  When designing our products, we use IEC products that have a very tight fit and contact tension. Eliminates the vibrating during a gig as well.loose

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    QSC has put a simple wire retainer on the IEC connector on the chassis of my PL236 that holds the IEC plug on the cable pretty securely. Must have cost a whopping $0.25 for parts and labor, although it does not have a high tech look like a PowerCon.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Use zip ties and tie the to something inside to provide some strain relief

                      I'm a big fan of spiral wire wrap loom like this for bundling wires inna rack:

                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Electric-Wires-5-5mm-OD-12M-Spiral-Wrapping-Bands-Black-/130775059366?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e72cd 0ba6

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        My keyboard rack - which contains a Samson SM10 Line Mixer, a Motif ES Rack unit, a MOTU MIDIExpressXT Midi interface, an ART Isolation Transformer, etc. All of these devices use either 1/4" TR/TRS connectors or 5 pin MIDI connectors. There's a small rack mount power strip mounted on the rear rails of the rack. In part for "protection" and in part for aesthetics - the top 4u (it's a 6u rack) of open rack space on the rear of the rack are covered with blanks.

                        Unfortunately, it seems like once every month of so (and always at the most inopportune time!) - I have to pull the blanks covering the back of the rack and reseat one or more of the connections. Unlike XLR and/or Speakon connectors that have a locking mechanism - some of the 1/4" and 5 pin DIN connectors are always jiggling half loose in the course of regular transport of the rack.

                        I'm hoping for a few suggestions on ways to secure "straight connectors" in jacks that prone to coming loose. Any ideas?
                        I take a TRS male connector and dip it in 200% ETHYL alcohol and push/pull and wipe several times in the female connectors to clean them. Especially on mixers where the routing changes on the signal on inserts etc. You can also use something like DeoxIT cleaners to do this. Clean all your male TRS/1/4 connectors as well.
                        Clean all your connections whatever they may be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          200% Ethanol does not exist. Perhaps you mean 200 proof?

                          Cleaning is one thing, it's necessary for there to be an antioxidant that prevents degrading of the metal. Plating helps but there is so much crap in the air these days that DeOxit R5 is the defacto standard for protection. A tiny amount will do it. The noral switches in insert jacks can not be cleaned by using a male plug. The switch is on the back side of the contact assy. A tiny spray of deOxit will migrate on there though, but don't do this more than every few years or you will end up with a mess.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've done plenty of these connections inside racks and with proper harnesses and strain relief loops I haven't ever had any problems. IEC power connections are a different story however.

                            I thought this was a pretty creative way to secure IEC's in some applications.
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJSzO5kTIMU

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              200% Ethanol does not exist. Perhaps you mean 200 proof?


                              I'm of the understanding that 200 proof Ethanol (or any alcohol) doesn't exist... except in theory.

                              Comment



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