Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bluegrass mic

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bluegrass mic

    I have a friend who's looking to microphone for live bluegrass sessions that will accommodate several musicians at the same time. He has little knowledge about the subject and asked my help, which is limited in this area. The folks I've talked to at the major chains have suggested condensers; one suggested an omni pattern but after reading up and talking to another store tech a cardioid pattern makes more sense as an omni could pick up crowd noise. I'm looking at a Rode NT1000, Rode NT1a, AKG C214 and sE 2200 II. The sE 2200 offers multipaterns (omni, cardioid and figure 8). Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance, Steve.

  • #2
    FYI: I just read a thread on a bluegrass forum about the Audio Technica AT4033 CL being the bluegrass "standard".....??????

    Comment


    • #3
      I would look at the audio technica offerings as well
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/Fender Musical Instruments Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

      Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

      Comment


      • #4
        A small-diaphragm condensor will have more even frequency response on the sides, which is usually what you'd want for that approach. The AT 4033 is in fact a small-diaphragm, but looks like the traditional "big mic". So that's why it's a popular mic for the bluegrass thing.
        "I would kill the children of a thousand planets, just to see you smile"

        Comment


        • #5
          In addition to the 4033, the 3035 is also widely used. Though discontinued, they can be found easily around the $100.00 mark. I have a pair of them I use for exactly what you describe, they are excellent.
          From there, it's a matter of finding the sweet spot between the group and if they even know how to do the one-mic-dance. Works quite well in the right situation.

          A&H GL2800 console, BagEnd Crystals over D-18's, 12"and 15" BagEnd and EAW wedges powered and processed by QSC, Klark, BSS, Symetrix, Valley, Sabine, Peavey and BagEnd INFRA.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have a friend who's looking to microphone for live bluegrass sessions that will accommodate several musicians at the same time. He has little knowledge about the subject and asked my help, which is limited in this area. The folks I've talked to at the major chains have suggested condensers; one suggested an omni pattern but after reading up and talking to another store tech a cardioid pattern makes more sense as an omni could pick up crowd noise. I'm looking at a Rode NT1000, Rode NT1a, AKG C214 and sE 2200 II. The sE 2200 offers multipaterns (omni, cardioid and figure 8). Any suggestions?
            Thanks in advance, Steve.
            +1 on the Audio Technica 4033. I have used this mic for many BG musicians. Not all BG bands like the one mic idea. If you purchase this mic then take a few extra bucks
            and purchase the large windscreen for it as well. Those diaphragms dont like saliva/spit/water etc, and are VERY sensitive to wind, and can be damaged by wind.
            Picture this... a guy takes a swig of beer, pop, mixed drink etc then spits all over your AT 4033. Get the idea?

            Comment


            • #7
              My buddy uses the AT4041's, he swears by them for bluegrass. I haven't heard them as of yet.

              Comment



              Working...
              X