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  • #16






    Quote Originally Posted by MarkGifford-1
    View Post

    Also, look into Sony Soundforge, as your recording platform. Not really any other competition and they just rolled out a Mac version, finally.




    Haven't used it myself, but I've heard a bunch of guys ragging on it, saying it's not as good as the PC version. :-b



    -Dan.
    Well, I've been to one world fair, a picnic, and a rodeo, and that's the stupidest thing I ever heard come over a set of earphones.

    Comment


    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by Randyman
      View Post

      I discovered long ago that the nasal, somewhat flat quality of my speaking voice is in large part due to the way I project it. My perception is I wouldn't be heard otherwise, so I project my voice out, which has the effect of accentuating the nasal qualities and makes for a compressed, "flat" sounding voice. Whereas when I'm relaxed and not trying so hard to be heard, my voice is actually kinda nice, at least acceptable.








      You were misdirecting your voice. You want to aim the voice almost straight up and then forward a hair so that the sound vibrates in your nose and eye region as well as in the soft palate. (I've had 8+ years of Opera-based training.)

      You can "rock" the direction of your voice back and forth and if you pay attention, you'll learn where you need to direct the sound so that you gain all the resonance - that's like getting a free amplifier, man! LOL
      Support your fellow HC members!
      PTD-1
      For Cables & Racks, Roadcases and Case Hardware : Audiopile.net
      For Vocal help: Vocal Forum Moderator Al Koehn's The Secrets of Successful Singing,









      Originally Posted by agedhorse


      You can't bridge these amps (yay).

      Comment


      • #18






        Quote Originally Posted by Consume
        View Post

        You were misdirecting your voice. You want to aim the voice almost straight up and then forward a hair so that the sound vibrates in your nose and eye region as well as in the soft palate. (I've had 8+ years of Opera-based training.)

        You can "rock" the direction of your voice back and forth and if you pay attention, you'll learn where you need to direct the sound so that you gain all the resonance - that's like getting a free amplifier, man! LOL




        Sign me up! I've always been envious of those guys with a naturally deep, resonant voice. When I've got a sore throat, I have a voice like that, but of course it doesn't last, and it's probably not a good idea to over do it when sick.



        My understanding is that it takes quite a bit of vocal coaching to develop some of the techniques/tricks learned from opera. I can do throat singing, like Tibetan monks/didgeridoo filter sweeps/whiskeyman blues talk-singing, as well as the high eeeeee that cuts through everything- but in my normal singing voice I struggle, it seems very mysterious to me. I usually feel like my normal singing voice is pretty good when I'm in a situation where I can belt it out like an opera singer in a big room or outdoors- at that point I'm hitting my pitches, have good sustain tone.



        To bring more of my "full voice" into my chest voice, for warmups I do a lot of the deep resonance with the throat singing and then try to transition to a chest voice, and then up high to cutting 'eeeeee". Some of what I know as a flute player helps as well: that too is all about sustain to warm up to getting a round, full tone. But voice or flute, I don't have the benefit of opera training. I can see classically trained vocalists doing specific things with their jaw, breathing, posture, but beyond the diaphragm support, I'm not sure what i'm seeing. My buddy who's a great soul singer is always emphasizing good diaphragm support and relaxing into it.

        Comment


        • #19
          A couple of classic VO mics are Shure SM7 and EV RE20 but I'd agree that the mic must be fit to the source & surroundings.



          Important stuff is ISOLATION & acoustics. Except for voice over music beds, isolation is a must (you can have zero background noise).



          I'd agree with other posters here. Talent agencies and big ad agencies are a good place to look for gigs.



          my .02
          J.R. Previously jrble

          See my Dog Of The Hair studio at: http://www.dogoth.com/studio/

          Quote from someone: Flat response? Get out the jack and change the tire.
          If you think "power is knowledge", you have it backwards.

          Comment


          • #20
            Pretty much any modern DAW or 2-track recording program will work for VO. I stick with DAWs because I'm a producer as well, but if you're just recording a voiceover, Sound Forge or WaveLab or even the Windows sound recorder will work.



            I work in radio production and I use REAPER (www.reaper.fm) because I find its file management to be the best (it's an important part of my job, handling the files and working quickly and no other DAW does it as good as REAPER). The program is easy to download and its demo is full-featured and uncorrupted. It just nags you to buy a license if you go past the 30-day window.



            I use the Waves L-series plugins for a lot of stuff. The L2 is a particular favorite. It makes it loud without making it all distorted. Their plugins aren't cheap, but they sound incredible.



            However, a great many places that want a voiceover will just want a good-sounding clean and mostly unprocessed VO...producers like to use their own effects chains to sweeten things when putting projects together. Unless you know what you're doing and/or your client wants processed VOs, you might want to stick to the basics...



            I've found that as long as the microphone isn't complete ****************, it will work. I've done tons of stuff with just an SM57 processed correctly. It's obviously a more lo-fi sound than a nice condenser, but it works, especially for heavily-processed stuff. Standard radio mics are dynamics like the EV RE20 and RE27 and the Shure SM5 (the pill mic, if you can find one) and SM7. Most VO people use condensers, though, and there's a **************** ton of cork-sniffing behavior in finding the "perfect mic chain" from mic to mic pre to compressor, etc...it's all kind of ridiculous and fortunately sort of going away with the broad availability of great-sounding plugins.



            Get a decent mic (spend at least $100 on a medium-to-large-diaphragm condenser and it should work for you, at least to start). Put it through a clean-sounding mic preamp. Some of the built-in preamps on basic audio interfaces like PreSonus' interfaces work great by themselves - I loved the results from my Firebox when I used it. At work I used the XENYX preamp on my crappy Behringer board for a long time and got great results that my clients loved. Now I just use the ART Tube MP pre for a little bit more warmth, but it's a very negligible difference that really is just for me.



            VERY IMPORTANT:

            The deader you make the room the better for VO. It's not like a recording studio - you don't want a room sound - EVER. That means getting the computer away from the microphone, too, and keeping the mic away from any fans or HVAC ducts. If you can afford a dedicated VO isolation booth, even better. You don't want ANY noise on your recordings at all.



            As for finding work, talent agencies, ad agencies, and creative services houses are good places to start. A lot of people like to keep a library of voices on file to offer potential clients for campaigns, so just make a good demo and get it to as many people as possible. Putting up profiles on voice123.com and other voiceover sites is a smart path as well.



            Radio stations are NOT good places to start, as they have no budgets anymore to pay you for your work. I have to be honest, I field at least two or three calls or emails every few weeks about this, and it's pretty annoying at this point. I've got nothing for you. I will accept free voiceovers, however, if you want to practice and get an honest critique, so PM me if you like with your contact info.



            I know that was a book, but I hope it's a helpful one. Good luck!

            Brian V.
            "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt." - Bertrand Russell

            Comment


            • #21






              Quote Originally Posted by Randyman
              View Post

              Sign me up! I've always been envious of those guys with a naturally deep, resonant voice. When I've got a sore throat, I have a voice like that, but of course it doesn't last, and it's probably not a good idea to over do it when sick.



              My understanding is that it takes quite a bit of vocal coaching to develop some of the techniques/tricks learned from opera. I can do throat singing, like Tibetan monks/didgeridoo filter sweeps/whiskeyman blues talk-singing, as well as the high eeeeee that cuts through everything- but in my normal singing voice I struggle, it seems very mysterious to me. I usually feel like my normal singing voice is pretty good when I'm in a situation where I can belt it out like an opera singer in a big room or outdoors- at that point I'm hitting my pitches, have good sustain tone.



              To bring more of my "full voice" into my chest voice, for warmups I do a lot of the deep resonance with the throat singing and then try to transition to a chest voice, and then up high to cutting 'eeeeee". Some of what I know as a flute player helps as well: that too is all about sustain to warm up to getting a round, full tone. But voice or flute, I don't have the benefit of opera training. I can see classically trained vocalists doing specific things with their jaw, breathing, posture, but beyond the diaphragm support, I'm not sure what i'm seeing. My buddy who's a great soul singer is always emphasizing good diaphragm support and relaxing into it.




              When you open your throat, you jaw should be somewhat like you have an overbite. (your lower jaw actually moves "backward" when you open your mouth. A lot of times people will push their lower jaw out when they hear the term "open throat" regarding singing.) you are taught to sing in what we call "dummy face" (watch some Barbara Streisand videos of her performing, she uses it. she almost looks like a porcelain doll when she sings.) like a ventriloquist's dummy.
              Support your fellow HC members!
              PTD-1
              For Cables & Racks, Roadcases and Case Hardware : Audiopile.net
              For Vocal help: Vocal Forum Moderator Al Koehn's The Secrets of Successful Singing,









              Originally Posted by agedhorse


              You can't bridge these amps (yay).

              Comment













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