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Help hooking up speakers

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  • Help hooking up speakers

    I've been playing with a QSC K12 for a while, as I play keys for my band. I've been getting into DJing as a way to make some money on the side, and I have my first gig in April. I bought a second QSC K12 for the occasion, and now I have some questions regarding hooking it up.

    Right now I've hooked up the post-gain line-out from my first speaker to the Line-in A of my second, but I'm pretty sure this gives me a mono sound? Do I need a mixer to make it stereo?

    I'm just new to the world of sound, so some help would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    A mixer would certainly be a good idea - and one with XLR outs. Simply connect the main (L / R) mixer outs to each speaker via a standard XLR mic line. That is probably the easiest way if you are using the system for DJ duty. What are you using as music source?



    Al
    <div class="signaturecontainer">KV2 KX12s - Yamaha DXR15s, RCF ART 310A , Yamaha DXR8 - Yamaha DXS12 subs, Wharfedale Titan 12 actives, Yamaha MG12/4 mixer X 2, Peavey PV10 mixer, Yorkville PGM8 mixer - Many Sony MD players (home and portable), Shure cordless microphone and a variety of LED lighting effects.</div>

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    • #3






      Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyxcore
      View Post

      I've been playing with a QSC K12 for a while, as I play keys for my band. I've been getting into DJing as a way to make some money on the side, and I have my first gig in April. I bought a second QSC K12 for the occasion, and now I have some questions regarding hooking it up.

      Right now I've hooked up the post-gain line-out from my first speaker to the Line-in A of my second, but I'm pretty sure this gives me a mono sound? Do I need a mixer to make it stereo?

      I'm just new to the world of sound, so some help would be greatly appreciated.




      The modern DJ seems to prefer a laptop computer or desktop computer to manage their music on. If this is the case for you then run from your computer to a small mixer then out to your loudspeakers. Whatever mixer you choose as your interface make sure it has balanced output. Tip/ring/sleeve 1.4 inch, or XLR out to XLR in on your loudspeakers.

      Something as simple as this will work fine for you.



      http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...th-compression



      With this unit you would need 1/4 balanced to xlr balanced cables.

      Comment


      • #4
        Use the loop out not the mix out on the first speaker to the second.



        Try to stay with balanced XLR connections.



        If you are coming out of a headphone out on your laptop, it needs to be summed first THEN balanced, do not use a TRS to XLR adapter as the wiring is incorrect for that application.

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        • #5
          what are u djing is it a party?

          Comment


          • #6






            Quote Originally Posted by Al Poulin
            View Post

            A mixer would certainly be a good idea - and one with XLR outs. Simply connect the main (L / R) mixer outs to each speaker via a standard XLR mic line. That is probably the easiest way if you are using the system for DJ duty. What are you using as music source?



            Al




            Sounds easy enough, thank you! I'm using a MBP.









            Quote Originally Posted by Pro Sound Guy
            View Post

            The modern DJ seems to prefer a laptop computer or desktop computer to manage their music on. If this is the case for you then run from your computer to a small mixer then out to your loudspeakers. Whatever mixer you choose as your interface make sure it has balanced output. Tip/ring/sleeve 1.4 inch, or XLR out to XLR in on your loudspeakers.

            Something as simple as this will work fine for you.



            http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...th-compression



            With this unit you would need 1/4 balanced to xlr balanced cables.




            I'll do some more research on it, but that mixer looks affordable and promising, so thank you! (:









            Quote Originally Posted by agedhorse
            View Post

            Use the loop out not the mix out on the first speaker to the second.



            Try to stay with balanced XLR connections.



            If you are coming out of a headphone out on your laptop, it needs to be summed first THEN balanced, do not use a TRS to XLR adapter as the wiring is incorrect for that application.




            What does "summed" mean and how do I do that? D;









            Quote Originally Posted by soundman11
            View Post

            what are u djing is it a party?




            Kind of. It's a mix of a party and art show. Arman Nobari, a popular local artist, is throwing it.

            Comment


            • #7
              If you want to bypass "summed" audio adaptorheadphone output get a usb mixer like this:



              http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pro-a...nnel-usb-mixer



              Also I've found once I switched to USB it resolved "hum" issues from ground loops as well from the laptop.



              And it's a great mixer.

              Comment


              • #8






                Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyxcore
                View Post

                What does "summed" mean and how do I do that? D




                Look up AV Direct Box. It's the proper tool for the job, it sums left and right in mono mode and generates a balanced mic lever output.

                Comment


                • #9
                  OP, a stereo signal has information for the left channel and the right channel. In order to get an appropriate mono signal, the information must be electrically "summed" (mixed). Failure to sum the stereo signal often leads to really weird sound, since there is cancellation of some of the musical content of the signal.



                  The problem is compounded by the use of a "stereo" plug that has a tip, a ring, and a sleeve (a "TRS" plug.). That TRS plug is carrying two channels of information via unbalanced wiring. A single speaker that accepts a TRS plug is expecting to be getting a single channel of information via a balanced (3 wire) cable. A summing direct box, like Agedhorse suggests, not only sums the stereo signal into mono, but also converts the signal from unbalanced to balanced. Mark C.
                  "Good tools are expensive. Cheap tools are damned expensive."

                  Comment


                  • #10






                    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeyxcore
                    View Post

                    What does "summed" mean and how do I do that? D;




                    MikoMan covered what it is quite well. As for how to do it, I've been using one of these lately, and it seems to work well.



                    http://www.markertek.com/Connectors-...d/ISOPOD.xhtml
                    <div class="signaturecontainer"><font size="1">Security Officers have been trained to not touch the service monkey<br />
                    </font></div>

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