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iPOD's and break music

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  • #16
    The video capability of the touch is full HD (1080 or 720 depending on the model). And video quality is quite good in full light. In partial light, I would say pretty grainy (due to the miniscule lens camera size), although our video director did shoot a full length video with HD cell cams in a moderately lit environment, and was fine with the results.
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    • #17
      The video capability of the touch is full HD (1080 or 720 depending on the model). And video quality is quite good in full light. In partial light, I would say pretty grainy (due to the miniscule lens camera size), although our video director did shoot a full length video with HD cell cams in a moderately lit environment, and was fine with the results.
      <div class="signaturecontainer">-</div>

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      • #18
        I know people think I am imagining things when I say this but I think the sound quality of Ipods suck *ss.

        The sad part is that you are basically forced to use them due to the simplicity of having so much music stored on such a little device.

        Your download rate or whatever it's called has a lot to do with the quality also.

        Another thing people say I imagine is that the multipin port sounds better then using the 1/8" headphone port.

        I have used both and IMO there is no comparison, the multiport to my ears sounds much clearer/cleaner.



        Rip a few songs from a CD that you like the quality of and store them on the ipod, then compare those tracks to ones you download.

        Another thing that drives me crazy is the audio level from song to song varies greatly, you have to babysit your board when playing break music to watch the levels.
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/VP-Pro-Sound/154678147927641" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/VP...54678147927641</a></div>

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        • #19
          I know people think I am imagining things when I say this but I think the sound quality of Ipods suck *ss.

          The sad part is that you are basically forced to use them due to the simplicity of having so much music stored on such a little device.

          Your download rate or whatever it's called has a lot to do with the quality also.

          Another thing people say I imagine is that the multipin port sounds better then using the 1/8" headphone port.

          I have used both and IMO there is no comparison, the multiport to my ears sounds much clearer/cleaner.



          Rip a few songs from a CD that you like the quality of and store them on the ipod, then compare those tracks to ones you download.

          Another thing that drives me crazy is the audio level from song to song varies greatly, you have to babysit your board when playing break music to watch the levels.
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/VP-Pro-Sound/154678147927641" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/VP...54678147927641</a></div>

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          • #20
            I personally hate Itunes.



            All of my music is in Windows Media Player and compressed to 320kbps. Most people could not hear the difference between 320kbps and an actual CD. As for the portable vs home units, I have tested and compared both sources through studio monitors and could not reliably say one sounded better than the other. (as long as the player has no internal EQ/effects applied of course). Both headphone output on the portable and RCA outs on the home units sounded identical to me in terms of quality. This was my experience. When I DJ, I mostly use the home units, but the rarer song request I will often have on my portables. I can almost guaratee you, you couldn't tell which I was playing. The main difference between the portables and the home units (most of the time) is the output level / where you will need to set your channel gain. My portables need more channel gain applied that my home units, even at almost full volume. The output of the home units is usually fixed and not variable like the portables.



            Al
            <div class="signaturecontainer">KV2 KX12s - Yamaha DXR15s, RCF ART 310A , Yamaha DXR8 - Yamaha DXS12 subs, Wharfedale Titan 12 actives, Yamaha MG12/4 mixer X 2, Peavey PV10 mixer, Yorkville PGM8 mixer - Many Sony MD players (home and portable), Shure cordless microphone and a variety of LED lighting effects.</div>

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            • #21
              I personally hate Itunes.



              All of my music is in Windows Media Player and compressed to 320kbps. Most people could not hear the difference between 320kbps and an actual CD. As for the portable vs home units, I have tested and compared both sources through studio monitors and could not reliably say one sounded better than the other. (as long as the player has no internal EQ/effects applied of course). Both headphone output on the portable and RCA outs on the home units sounded identical to me in terms of quality. This was my experience. When I DJ, I mostly use the home units, but the rarer song request I will often have on my portables. I can almost guaratee you, you couldn't tell which I was playing. The main difference between the portables and the home units (most of the time) is the output level / where you will need to set your channel gain. My portables need more channel gain applied that my home units, even at almost full volume. The output of the home units is usually fixed and not variable like the portables.



              Al
              <div class="signaturecontainer">KV2 KX12s - Yamaha DXR15s, RCF ART 310A , Yamaha DXR8 - Yamaha DXS12 subs, Wharfedale Titan 12 actives, Yamaha MG12/4 mixer X 2, Peavey PV10 mixer, Yorkville PGM8 mixer - Many Sony MD players (home and portable), Shure cordless microphone and a variety of LED lighting effects.</div>

              Comment


              • #22






                Quote Originally Posted by soul-x
                View Post

                The video capability of the touch is full HD (1080 or 720 depending on the model). And video quality is quite good in full light. In partial light, I would say pretty grainy (due to the miniscule lens camera size), although our video director did shoot a full length video with HD cell cams in a moderately lit environment, and was fine with the results.




                I tried to get info on the megapixel count for the onboard still camera (4th generation Touch), and couldn't find anything. Seems to me that it's 1.2MP. I just got of the phone with a buddy who's a professional photographer, and he mentioned graininess as well. He said it would probably look good on the Touch's small screen, but not good/too grainy for anything larger.
                Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

                (I came, I saw, I stuck around)

                Comment


                • #23






                  Quote Originally Posted by soul-x
                  View Post

                  The video capability of the touch is full HD (1080 or 720 depending on the model). And video quality is quite good in full light. In partial light, I would say pretty grainy (due to the miniscule lens camera size), although our video director did shoot a full length video with HD cell cams in a moderately lit environment, and was fine with the results.




                  I tried to get info on the megapixel count for the onboard still camera (4th generation Touch), and couldn't find anything. Seems to me that it's 1.2MP. I just got of the phone with a buddy who's a professional photographer, and he mentioned graininess as well. He said it would probably look good on the Touch's small screen, but not good/too grainy for anything larger.
                  Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

                  (I came, I saw, I stuck around)

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    My advice:



                    - I buy my tunes from Amazon or Google (always mp3). Google uses 320 bit rate and Amazon recently converted most to 256. If you already owned songs purchased from Amazon you can download the better quality versions for free through your amazon player.



                    - To level volume use the PC version of mp3gain. It's an older program but works wonderfully. the PC version is NON-DESTRUCTIVE. This means it stores the volume changes in the tag and they can be redone or removed at any time through mp3gain. I have mine set at 93 dB (they suggest 89 but that's far too low). At 93 clipping will be indicated on many tracks, but don't worry about it. The clipping algorithm isn't all that great and I've never heard clipping. If you're really worried about it you can set to 91 and it will be fine, but that's just really quiet. Most modern tracks are 98-100. The mac version is DESTRUCTIVE meaning there's no going back once you've made changes.



                    - I use a Whirlwind IsoPod . At around $50 it's not cheap, but it works VERY well and I recommend highly if you're trying to pipe it mono through one channel strip of your board.
                    www.nextexitrocks.com

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      My advice:



                      - I buy my tunes from Amazon or Google (always mp3). Google uses 320 bit rate and Amazon recently converted most to 256. If you already owned songs purchased from Amazon you can download the better quality versions for free through your amazon player.



                      - To level volume use the PC version of mp3gain. It's an older program but works wonderfully. the PC version is NON-DESTRUCTIVE. This means it stores the volume changes in the tag and they can be redone or removed at any time through mp3gain. I have mine set at 93 dB (they suggest 89 but that's far too low). At 93 clipping will be indicated on many tracks, but don't worry about it. The clipping algorithm isn't all that great and I've never heard clipping. If you're really worried about it you can set to 91 and it will be fine, but that's just really quiet. Most modern tracks are 98-100. The mac version is DESTRUCTIVE meaning there's no going back once you've made changes.



                      - I use a Whirlwind IsoPod . At around $50 it's not cheap, but it works VERY well and I recommend highly if you're trying to pipe it mono through one channel strip of your board.
                      www.nextexitrocks.com

                      Comment


                      • #26






                        Quote Originally Posted by Vinny D
                        View Post

                        I know people think I am imagining things when I say this but I think the sound quality of Ipods suck *ss.

                        The sad part is that you are basically forced to use them due to the simplicity of having so much music stored on such a little device.

                        Your download rate or whatever it's called has a lot to do with the quality also.

                        Another thing people say I imagine is that the multipin port sounds better then using the 1/8" headphone port.

                        I have used both and IMO there is no comparison, the multiport to my ears sounds much clearer/cleaner.



                        Rip a few songs from a CD that you like the quality of and store them on the ipod, then compare those tracks to ones you download.

                        Another thing that drives me crazy is the audio level from song to song varies greatly, you have to babysit your board when playing break music to watch the levels.




                        Good points VinnyD, I hadn't thought about levels. Hmmmm.
                        Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

                        (I came, I saw, I stuck around)

                        Comment


                        • #27






                          Quote Originally Posted by Vinny D
                          View Post

                          I know people think I am imagining things when I say this but I think the sound quality of Ipods suck *ss.

                          The sad part is that you are basically forced to use them due to the simplicity of having so much music stored on such a little device.

                          Your download rate or whatever it's called has a lot to do with the quality also.

                          Another thing people say I imagine is that the multipin port sounds better then using the 1/8" headphone port.

                          I have used both and IMO there is no comparison, the multiport to my ears sounds much clearer/cleaner.



                          Rip a few songs from a CD that you like the quality of and store them on the ipod, then compare those tracks to ones you download.

                          Another thing that drives me crazy is the audio level from song to song varies greatly, you have to babysit your board when playing break music to watch the levels.




                          Good points VinnyD, I hadn't thought about levels. Hmmmm.
                          Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

                          (I came, I saw, I stuck around)

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            There are programs you can download (or maybe even a feature built in Itunes) to normalize the levels of the songs in your library. It's probably far from perfect, but probably better than having no adjustments at all.
                            <div class="signaturecontainer">KV2 KX12s - Yamaha DXR15s, RCF ART 310A , Yamaha DXR8 - Yamaha DXS12 subs, Wharfedale Titan 12 actives, Yamaha MG12/4 mixer X 2, Peavey PV10 mixer, Yorkville PGM8 mixer - Many Sony MD players (home and portable), Shure cordless microphone and a variety of LED lighting effects.</div>

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              There are programs you can download (or maybe even a feature built in Itunes) to normalize the levels of the songs in your library. It's probably far from perfect, but probably better than having no adjustments at all.
                              <div class="signaturecontainer">KV2 KX12s - Yamaha DXR15s, RCF ART 310A , Yamaha DXR8 - Yamaha DXS12 subs, Wharfedale Titan 12 actives, Yamaha MG12/4 mixer X 2, Peavey PV10 mixer, Yorkville PGM8 mixer - Many Sony MD players (home and portable), Shure cordless microphone and a variety of LED lighting effects.</div>

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Varying normalization of levels on differently mastered tracks is an issue one would have to deal with no matter if the recorded music source is a compressed digital player, a cd, cassette, 8-track, reel-to-reel, vinyl, phonographic cylinders, or carved on a player piano scroll.
                                <div class="signaturecontainer">-</div>

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