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  • PC based spectrum/VU meter

    Morning guys,

     

    Have any of you interfaced your PC/laptop using any of the digital spectrum analyzer or VU meter tools out there? Some that I am looking at and would like some feedback on have links below; I looked around for some stand alone rack mount ones and it looks like the only options are the $60 inaccurate crap flashy light kind that are marketed to DJs and very high end Dorrough or Rand that are far too expensive for what I need. I am looking for something that can pull dual duty to work for both live sound and home recording.

     

    Appreciate any feedback on these:

     

    http://littlefishaudio.com/nugen-visualizer-meter-mixes-spectrum-correlation-phase.html

    http://littlefishaudio.com/brainworx-bxmeter-dynamic-range-meter-with-m-s-modes.html

    http://littlefishaudio.com/flux-pure-analyzer-metering.html

     

    Thanks,

     

    Rob

     

    Did I mention the new forum sucks?

  • #2
    I have a couple 1/3 octave AudioControl units that I am not using. Easy to use and stand alone self contained.

    There are many pc based solutions available, some easy to use but somewhat limited, some very robust but complicated. The biggest thing is to understand the limitations and relative value.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Former product development engineer: Genz Benz, a KMC Music/FMIC/JAM Industries Company, continuing factory level product support and service for Genz Benz

    Currently product development engineer: Mesa Boogie

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  • #3

    It depends on your use. I heard a guy pink noise a room the other day and thought "gee, I haven't done that in YEARS". I tend to use the eardrum method because after all of the sound & fury signifying nothing (pink noise :-), you then proceed to EQ it so that it sounds good.

    If you test speakers, or use it for comparative analysis then acuracy is important. I use one in real time patched into my cue mix (no calibrated mic involved) so that I can locate problems during a show. For this, the cheap $60 BIG BRIGHT one works well (all I need to do is see where the FB spike is or if there's obviously too much energy in some certan band). For my use a db or two acuracy doesn't really matter. + or - 10% on the freq is OK too if I'm using a 1/3 octave graph. The big & bright part is the most important, for quick reference during a performance.

    Again, it depends on how you use it.

    Cheers

    JR

    J.R. Previously jrble

    See my Dog Of The Hair studio at: http://www.dogoth.com/studio/

    Quote from someone: Flat response? Get out the jack and change the tire.
    If you think "power is knowledge", you have it backwards.

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    • Rob_H
      Rob_H commented
      Editing a comment

      JRBLE wrote:

      It depends on your use. I heard a guy pink noise a room the other day and thought "gee, I haven't done that in YEARS". I tend to use the eardrum method because after all of the sound & fury signifying nothing (pink noise :-), you then proceed to EQ it so that it sounds good.

      If you test speakers, or use it for comparative analysis then acuracy is important. I use one in real time patched into my cue mix (no calibrated mic involved) so that I can locate problems during a show. For this, the cheap $60 BIG BRIGHT one works well (all I need to do is see where the FB spike is or if there's obviously too much energy in some certan band). For my use a db or two acuracy doesn't really matter. + or - 10% on the freq is OK too if I'm using a 1/3 octave graph. The big & bright part is the most important, for quick reference during a performance.

      Again, it depends on how you use it.

      Cheers

      JR


      Thanks,

       

      I am looking for a few things, I have found the spectrum analyzer has helped me in the past to better understand a few things; where the signal is to help EQ the room and also during recording to help with where compression may be either too light or too heavy. I am not looking for a pink noise generator, a lot of programs that have the meters I am looking for seem to have it built in though; I am sure I will play around with it a bit but previous experience has shown me, like you, that my ears are better for flattening a room. I have been playing around with Studio 1 even though my board isn't here yet and may have found a solution there as it has a SA option, just need to play around a bit after it does show and see how practical it is.













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