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  • "Between Jobs"

    That's code for, "was laid off". After shy of 4 years at my last position, after what my boss told me I found it impossible to work another day there (apologies to Ed Norton and The Honeymooners...always loved that line).


    That was the bad news. The good news is that I'm setting up for a phone interview next week for a new job. This is exceedingly fast in IT from my experience, so I'm really anxious to do well. Landing a job before my severence ends would be fantastic, but I keep hope checked with today's realities.


    Good vibes, etc. are always welcome. Or at least don't spill soup on my suit if I get a face-to-face interview.....;-)

    Write something...

  • #2

    Good luck on the new job, man. What do you do? I just wrote my exam for part 1 of the CCNA course, which was also my last exam of the semester. (computer engineering technology)

    I'm in a similar boat. I was working a sweet part time gig at my local parks and rec (been there off and on for about 7 years) when my contract ended two weeks ago. They hadn't warned me ahead of time so all of a sudden I was out of a job. They want me to work a summer position but they've yet to post it... then it has to stay posted for two weeks... then they have to do interviews... then I have to work a few weeks before I get my first pay (two week cycle)... man what a pain in the ass.

    I do have another job offer though, which is good. I might take it up for the summer, but we'll see.

    Comment


    • Craig Vecchione
      Craig Vecchione commented
      Editing a comment

      Mogwix wrote:

      Good luck on the new job, man. What do you do? I just wrote my exam for part 1 of the CCNA course, which was also my last exam of the semester. (computer engineering technology)

      I'm in a similar boat. I was working a sweet part time gig at my local parks and rec (been there off and on for about 7 years) when my contract ended two weeks ago. They hadn't warned me ahead of time so all of a sudden I was out of a job. They want me to work a summer position but they've yet to post it... then it has to stay posted for two weeks... then they have to do interviews... then I have to work a few weeks before I get my first pay (two week cycle)... man what a pain in the ass.

      I do have another job offer though, which is good. I might take it up for the summer, but we'll see.




      Thanks for the good wishes. I've done programming (Cobol of all things!) and various types of level-2 support and development for the past 20 years. Started off as a programmer and realized I actually enjoy working with people rather than just code.


      I've also side-worked forever in electrician and various light construction construction jobs to help out friends, etc. I really enjoy the work but am realistic in how much I can earn and in the inherent dangers of construction.


      The irony is that I used to be an auto tech and then service manager, and moved to IT for "stability" which I've found is anything but for most of the past 2 decades. I was *never* out of work in the auto business, but have seen plenty of unemployment checks as jobs shift or simply dry up.


      Good luck with your decision, it's certainly good to have options.


  • #3

    About 6 weeks ago I, along with 2 other co-workers, was laid off. Ironically, it was on the same day I was giving my 2 weeks. Of the 3 of us in the meeting, I was the one trying not to grin.

     

    I worked for Falcon AV for 7 years, but I got tired of traveling all over the country. I left there and went to work for Direct Communications about a year and a half ago. From all indications, Direct looked like a stable Co. on the way up, but as soon as I signed on things started falling apart. Key personnel were allowed to walk and bad decisions led to me being the 2nd senior-most employee when I was dismissed. 25 people left Direct Communications in the 16 months I worked there. At the time of my dismissal there were 4 employees left, but I had seen this coming for a long time and had just made a decision on which of 3 job offers I had on the table.

     

    Right now, around here (Tulsa), there

    Comment


    • Craig Vecchione
      Craig Vecchione commented
      Editing a comment

      Okie4Cards wrote:

      About 6 weeks ago I, along with 2 other co-workers, was laid off. Ironically, it was on the same day I was giving my 2 weeks. Of the 3 of us in the meeting, I was the one trying not to grin.


       


      I worked for Falcon AV for 7 years, but I got tired of traveling all over the country. I left there and went to work for Direct Communications about a year and a half ago. From all indications, Direct looked like a stable Co. on the way up, but as soon as I signed on things started falling apart. Key personnel were allowed to walk and bad decisions led to me being the 2nd senior-most employee when I was dismissed. 25 people left Direct Communications in the 16 months I worked there. At the time of my dismissal there were 4 employees left, but I had seen this coming for a long time and had just made a decision on which of 3 job offers I had on the table.


       


      Right now, around here (Tulsa), there


  • #4
    Good luck!!

    NO SIGNATURE FOR YOU!!

    Comment


    • Bobby1Note
      Bobby1Note commented
      Editing a comment

      I've got my fingers crossed for you CraigV,,,, good luck.

      No more "work" for me,,,, I've been put "out to pasture" for good. The "Golden Years"  as they say,,,,,,,,


  • #5
    Ahhhh, COBOL, ALGOL, fortran, hpl, hpgl, rpg, basic all bring back memories, but I also quickly recognized that these could easily become exportable jobs the would also require much effort to remain cutting edge. Algorithms and approaches change so fast that its easy to be left behind. That's what steered my decision towards industrial controls and power systems. Pro audio and MI (up until now) has followed this more than IT, but it looks like this is also changing.

    Older folks that have a wider range of experiences often make the best project managers, as well as support and application engineers. Depth of knowledge without the breadth is a hinderence here. My prediction is that you will have no problem finding something interesting that will lead to a great new job. Maybe something you haven't yet considered.

    Comment


    • Audiopile
      Audiopile commented
      Editing a comment

      agedhorse wrote:
      My prediction is that you will have no problem finding something interesting that will lead to a great new job. Maybe something you haven't yet considered.

      Mark wrote:

      This possible business idea popped into my mind awhile ago... being a business kind of like "Geek Squad".  My idea is: "I'll read the manual for you and tell you what it sez... for a fee."  Maybe an app could be developed for the service.

      Similarly:  I'm of the impression that technical report writing is and always has been an "in demand" and timeless skill... and likely is a career that can be pursued regardless of location & lifestyle (live anywhere you want, work in your underwear while sitting on a beanbag chair munching cheesy-poofs if you want)... and likely could be a "work at your own schedule" situation.

      If I wasn't doing what I do to make a living, I'd likely pursue a career of technical report writing (oh... that's right... technical report writing is one of my primary duties in my day job).

      Either that, or I'd make a career out of destruction testing products (oh... that's right... destruction testing products is another one of my primary duties in my day job).


    • Craig Vecchione
      Craig Vecchione commented
      Editing a comment

      agedhorse wrote:
      Ahhhh, COBOL, ALGOL, fortran, hpl, hpgl, rpg, basic all bring back memories, but I also quickly recognized that these could easily become exportable jobs the would also require much effort to remain cutting edge. Algorithms and approaches change so fast that its easy to be left behind. That's what steered my decision towards industrial controls and power systems. Pro audio and MI (up until now) has followed this more than IT, but it looks like this is also changing.

      Older folks that have a wider range of experiences often make the best project managers, as well as support and application engineers. Depth of knowledge without the breadth is a hinderence here. My prediction is that you will have no problem finding something interesting that will lead to a great new job. Maybe something you haven't yet considered.

      How about PDP-11? There are many more failed or forgotten programming languages than most realize. 


      BTW, Andy, by any chance does the name Charles Kapps ring a bell? I *think* he had a masters in EE, and definitely had a doctorate in Computer Science. He and Robert Stafford wrote several texts on early languages. He worked as a numerical analyst on the Apollo Moonlander for Raytheon (re-entry trajectories!), and for Integrated Circuits Systems on the design processes for Very Large-Scale Integrated Circuits in the 1980's. His wife Marcia wears a necklace that has a dime-sized IC she claims Charlie designed for the power control systems for one of the huge malls in our area. I thought perhaps with your similar backgrounds you may have crossed paths at some point. And FWIW, that's one helluva resume!


  • #6

    Wishing you success.

    Comment


    • #7

      Best wishes that you'll land something good quickly. How is the job market in PA these days. It wasn't so good when I left but that was a long time ago.

      Comment


      • #8

        Hang in there and keep a "can do" attitude!

        Sometimes we forget how cool it was when we were kids and did not have to go to school!

        Just the excitement of having the day off with no cares or worries!

        A time to go fishing, biking, working on your house, and fixing up that old pair of monitors or subs.

        Enjoy your time off while you have it, and a door closed behind you with a window open in front of you!

         

        Comment


        • Craig Vecchione
          Craig Vecchione commented
          Editing a comment

          As always, excellent advice and counsel from everyone. Thanks once again! The phone interview is tomorrow afternoon, so there's some time to prepare.

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