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  • Deafening loud soundcheck

    Attended an event this weekend that featured a well known national act. Had a chance to hang out during sound check and was quite surprised at how loud it was. I mean LOUD. I ended up leaving after just a few minutes as it was near painful and it wasn't a metal act.

    I know the owner of the company and they're no rookies at this, been in business a long time working with A acts. I just don't understand the over the top spl's , anyone have some input of what was being accomplished? Perhaps it was for a perfectly good reason?

  • #2

    The only thing that comes to mind is, an empty venue during soundcheck, vs a fully-packed venue at show-time. (sound-absorbing human water-bags)

    Veni, Vidi, Velcro;

    (I came, I saw, I stuck around)

    Comment


    • #3
      I can think of several reasons:

      1. Shakedown of the pa to be sure there are no issues volumewise once the audience is there.

      2. Checking that there will be no feedback issues by testing at elevated gains and volumes

      3. Checking that there's no issues with bleed or wraparound from the pa onto the stage.

      4. Because that's the way the act wants it.

      5. Because that's the way the foh engineer wants it.

      6 checking that monitors & mixes will be adequate at high pa volumes.

      Comment


      • sibyrnes
        sibyrnes commented
        Editing a comment

        agedhorse wrote:
        I can think of several reasons:

        1. Shakedown of the pa to be sure there are no issues volumewise once the audience is there.

        2. Checking that there will be no feedback issues by testing at elevated gains and volumes

        3. Checking that there's no issues with bleed or wraparound from the pa onto the stage.

        4. Because that's the way the act wants it.

        5. Because that's the way the foh engineer wants it.

        6 checking that monitors & mixes will be adequate at high pa volumes.


        Right!  The souncheck has to be loud.  I get complaints sometimes and I  tell them it's just a  check.  I explain to them that the actual show will be less volume and that I am eliminating potential problems and they usually understand.  Communication is key!


      • Audiopile
        Audiopile commented
        Editing a comment

        agedhorse wrote:
        I can think of several reasons:

        1. Shakedown of the pa to be sure there are no issues volumewise once the audience is there.

        2. Checking that there will be no feedback issues by testing at elevated gains and volumes

        3. Checking that there's no issues with bleed or wraparound from the pa onto the stage.

        4. Because that's the way the act wants it.

        5. Because that's the way the foh engineer wants it.

        6 checking that monitors & mixes will be adequate at high pa volumes.

        Yup


    • #4

      Andy said it. I like to push the rig during soundcheck to check the headroom and watch for any issues. I'd rather something go wrong during soundcheck than during the show.

      Comment


      • #5
        I had considered much of that, just didn't think it needed to be that loud to accomplish much of it.
        Was the first time I've heard a soundcheck with an act at that level, did not realize how loud it could be.

        Comment


        • WynnD
          WynnD commented
          Editing a comment
          As a person who has walked out of one regional act and one national act because they were Too F***ing Loud. I'd rather they push the system during the sound check and back down to rational levels for the show. If I leave a show in the future, I'm asking for a refund. (I'm old enough to drive them nuts about it now.)

        • Vinny D
          Vinny D commented
          Editing a comment

          But what is loud? was there a DB meter that you could get a reading from?

          My idea of loud and your idea of loud may very well be two different things..


      • #6

        Hmmmm, the difference between 105 and 125dB at 120 feet outdoors is a pretty substantial difference and a factor of 10x VOLTAGE wise (100x POWER wise), and a pretty substantial pa by even large pa standards.

        I'm having a hard time believing this, especially for a tribute act. Sorry Matt.

         

        (edited to correct factual error)

        Comment


        • RoadRanger
          RoadRanger commented
          Editing a comment

          agedhorse wrote:
          Hmmmm, the difference between 105 and 125dB at 120 feet outdoors is a pretty substantial difference and a factor of 10x VOLTAGE wise (100x POWER wise), and a pretty substantial pa by even large pa standards.

          Yah, I def call BS on that play too LOL. For a non-line array that calculates out at about 1/2 a megawatt assuming 100db 1w/1m sensitivity .


        • MeerkatSound
          MeerkatSound commented
          Editing a comment

          agedhorse wrote:

          Hmmmm, the difference between 105 and 125dB at 120 feet outdoors is a pretty substantial difference and a factor of 10x VOLTAGE wise (100x POWER wise), and a pretty substantial pa by even large pa standards.

          I'm having a hard time believing this, especially for a tribute act. Sorry Matt.

           

          (edited to correct factual error)



           

          I wish I had taken a picture or even a short video of the dB meter (the meter was a simple Radio Shack one)... but indeed the PA was Freak-n LOUD!  I didn't say it sounded pretty inside the tent at first.

           

          The Clair tech who designed the system was on the gig putting the system though it paces; the 125 peak db was during the initial system shake down and all the power amps where in the limiters across all the frequency bands.  The rig had 6 top boxes powered with 4 Lab Gruppen PLM20000Q per side for mains; subs where 3 db B2 and 3 D12 amps per side set-up in Cardio fashion.

           

          Once the frequency gains where set, the rest of the performer

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