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  • Amp shields

    Does anyone here have any thoughts/guidance/direct experience with using amp shields to reduce stage volume?  I seem to remember OneEng posting that his band turns their amps backwards but I don't recall anyone posting about using shields instead.  The venue I mix for is a microbrewery "Tasting room" where folks (not uncommonly with their kids) come to meet and chat and the owner is adamant that the overall volume in the room not drive his target audience away not to mention the obvious benefit of improving the overall sound in general if the backline is not bleeding through the vocal mics.  One of the other sound guys in the rotation built simple Plexiglas panels with legs for another venue he mixes at and says they work well but I thought I'd ask here for any plusses and/or minuses to consider.

    ...dave

  • #2

    IMO yous guys can just turn down and tilt the amps back so that they are pointed at your ears. Now the drums are another story but you didn't mention drums? Personally when I'm playing bass I usually just plug straight in and put it in my monitor.

    Comment


    • Tomm Williams
      Tomm Williams commented
      Editing a comment

      You didn't mention if this is a sound job or if it's a band you play in, probably doesn't matter. I'm with RR, why not just turn down? is it one of those "tone" issues? Not that I don't get that but if the venue is that adamant about low volume and you want the gig................................. is the volume of the drummer (is there a drummer?) going to be a problem ? My bands approach has always been to let the drummer play how he plays and we get barely above him. Been able to keep it pretty civilized so far. Also seen amps laying on their backs firing at the ceiling. Would have to be a loud stage to resort to that but maybe that's what you're dealing with?

      I would rather not deal with shields as it's just one more piece of gear to buy and haul around. I did do one gig where a drum shield was mandatory but not with a guitar......................yet. 


    • dbMontana
      dbMontana commented
      Editing a comment

      RoadRanger wrote:

      IMO yous guys can just turn down and tilt the amps back so that they are pointed at your ears. Now the drums are another story but you didn't mention drums?

      RR: Certainly turning down works but you know those pesky guitar guy's common complaint of "I need to have the volume up to get the tone I want".  Tilting the amp back also helps some as it's an 18" stage but there is a second-floor deck/balcony that has to be considered as well. Then of course the drums are another issue altogether but so far the drummers haven't been the problem.  


      Personally when I'm playing bass I usually just plug straight in and put it in my monitor.

      Hey I'd welcome you playing at this venue anytime as I suggest that option and offer that in return to everyone (and if the player still wants their amp there often there's a XLR out on the amp I can tag).  Still...


  • #3

    I have probably posted a half dozen times about amp shields so forgive me for repeating myself.

    Here in Vancouver BC they are very prevalent. Places like the Boulevard Casino, the River Rock Casino, the Fairview, FanClub, Columbia Theatre, and IIRC the Starlight and Grand Villa casinos, all use guitar amp shields. A few are plexiglass, some are plywood with carpet, and some are other various materials - I've even seen one guy use cardboard.. In addition, the River Rock Casino now shields the entire drum kit. Not a real joy for the drummer but if it keeps the gig going, then so be it.

    When I do sound or play guitar, I have used anvil cases, hard shell guitar cases, and sometimes I'll bring my own small plexiglass shield I made myself. I use amp shields on most of the pub and other small gigs I play, and of course when I play the above named rooms they always shield me.

    IMHO they are the only way to fly, and once you get used to them, it doesn't interfere with your enjoyment. In fact you can lean into a note without worrying about knocking out the whole table in front of you. I prefer amp shields to tilting the cab up, because with the cab tilted,  it can bleed into the vocal mics.

    Comment


    • dbMontana
      dbMontana commented
      Editing a comment

      Shaster wrote:

      I have probably posted a half dozen times about amp shields so forgive me for repeating myself.

      Here in Vancouver BC they are very prevalent. Places like the Boulevard Casino, the River Rock Casino, the Fairview, FanClub, Columbia Theatre, and IIRC the Starlight and Grand Villa casinos, all use guitar amp shields. A few are plexiglass, some are plywood with carpet, and some are other various materials - I've even seen one guy use cardboard.. In addition, the River Rock Casino now shields the entire drum kit. Not a real joy for the drummer but if it keeps the gig going, then so be it.

      When I do sound or play guitar, I have used anvil cases, hard shell guitar cases, and sometimes I'll bring my own small plexiglass shield I made myself. I use amp shields on most of the pub and other small gigs I play, and of course when I play the above named rooms they always shield me.

      IMHO they are the only way to fly, and once you get used to them, it doesn't interfere with your enjoyment. In fact you can lean into a note without worrying about knocking out the whole table in front of you. I prefer amp shields to tilting the cab up, because with the cab tilted,  it can bleed into the vocal mics.


      Shaster:  Sorry I missed your previous posts.  I searched for several things today but posted this question without doing so specifically for this topic.  Thanks for the testimonial -- that's what I was looking for.


  • #4

    +1 on the amp shields!  I have been playing for many years in rock bands and do not recall seeing them used.  I currently play trombone in a successful local hobbydad band.   The trumpet player and I often use a small polycarbonate shield placed on the microphone to keep us from punching a hole in the mix when we play high notes.  I wish our guitarists would use the shields or turn down.  Good luck!

    Everybody is terminally ill.

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