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  • Monitor placement

    I see this a lot where 1 monitor is set on the left side and 1 on the right side shaped like a V in front of the performer is this a good Idea? Thanks.

  • #2
    Depends on a lot of things. Whats going in, how loud , how many filters your willing to add to get feedback out if there. etc. Another important part is microphone type. Cardioid or hypercardioid etc. Cardioid you'd want "in general" to have the microphone's back to be pointing at the speaker. If its hypercardioid then have the speakers around 30 degrees or so to the left/right of the back of the microphone. http://www.shure.eu/support_download...polar_patterns

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    • #3
      I have worked with multiple artists who actually want a stereo monitor mix, so they will get two wedges. Actually saw a show where the guitard had 5 wedges - each wedge had a different instrument in it. Most of the time when I get an artist wanting two wedges, they just want it LOUD.
      Last edited by dedmeet; 03-08-2017, 07:44 AM. Reason: bad grammar
      Chief fader ape, wire monkey, mic macaque, and speaker chimp.

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      • #4
        Loud! That's for sure, some are half deaf in one ear!

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        • #5
          Yep, sometimes it's what the act wants and they just expect you to make it work.

          A&H GL2800 console, BagEnd Crystals over D-18's, 12"and 15" BagEnd and EAW wedges powered and processed by QSC, Klark, BSS, Symetrix, Valley, Sabine, Peavey and BagEnd INFRA.

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          • #6
            I do this a lot. It does give you more volume (most noticeably low end). What I've found is that I don't point each horn directly at the performers head (microphone) but rather splay them out just a couple of degrees so that the center axis of the horn is pointed at their ears (more like brushing past them). This seems to satisfy the performer AND allow me to actually get that few more db of gain before feedback (makes EQing them much easier).
            J.R. Previously jrble

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            • #7
              I do it when using Beta 87a vocal microphones simply due to the pattern and needing extra volume on a stage that is already too loud.
              Last edited by mshifflett; 03-21-2017, 10:37 AM.

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              • #8
                In fact, high end companies make left and right pairs of monitors just for this purpose. Getting more common than it was not that many years ago.

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                • #9
                  As the lead singer in my band, I prefer 2 monitors, but seldom have the room, and sometimes motivation. Ears being on the side of the head, you can hear the monitors better when they are off to the side. With a single monitor in front of you at a gig, try turning your head left or right and you'll notice a big difference in volume and clarity/definition as the compression driver is directing the highs into your ear. You can generally keep the overall volume lower because the sound is being better directed and sent to both ears.
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