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Starting up an acoustic duo act - guitar advice

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  • Starting up an acoustic duo act - guitar advice

    Hello, I'm jumping from a band situation to start up an acoustic classic rock duo. I'm thrilled at the prospect of carrying a fraction of the PA, not having to mic up a large drum kit, and playing gigs that end at midnight.

    As I transition from electic to acoustic guitar, i'm experiencing discomfort or stiffness in my left hand as i start playing, it eventually goes away. I am playing more now, as I attempt to work on adding new material nightly.

    I'm wondering if maybe I should invest in a hybrid guitar. I tried a Taylor T5, and it's a lot easier to play the solos than my yamaha apx7 model acoustic/electric. I'm going to check out the Crafter version this weekend. It seems like a no-brainer to me, but I'm wondering if there's a downside I haven't considered?

    Have a blessed day!

    A new Quinnipiac survey found that voters rate Mr. Obama as the country’s worst president since World War II.
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...resident-ever/

  • #2
    The major downside is that they don't really sound like acoustic guitars. Whether that is important or not is up to you.

    My wife and I were out listening to a guy playing some kind of hybrid. She turned and said "what's wrong with his guitar? It sounds terrible"

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    • #3
      Why do you have to play an acoustic? There's no rule saying you have to.
      Winner of best guitarist in the house. (my house)!

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      • #4
        Hey there Ulysses, while I know nothing about the hybrid guitar, going from band to duo is a fantastic move that you won't regret. I can imagine having played electric rather than acoustic the transition would be rough on the fretting hand. Even now, I find if I slack off with practice during the week, come weekend, when it's time to play 50+ tunes on the acoustic, the hands aren't very happy by the end of the night. All the best with your new direction!

        Luke
        <div class="signaturecontainer">'Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens'.<br />
        Twitter: @LukeBMusic</div>

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        • #5
          Hi Mom!

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          • #6


            Right on. I often use an early 70's Univox Coily.

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            • #7
              Play a Rick Turner you'll never look back.

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              • #8
                Whilst probably one of the most disparaged of guitars, I just bought an Ovation Custom Elite and couldn't be much happier. The sound unplugged is fine but not spectacular but as its always played in anger plugged in that really is unimportant to me and the plugged in sound is fab. It has the advantages of being a tough beast because of the fiberglass back and whilst beauty is in the eye of the beholder, I have had more audience members compliment me on its looks than any guitar I have ever had. But above all that, I suffer with tendonitis in my fingers and the neck on this is the easiest acoustic to play by some way. I considered the hybrid route and was going to go with the PRS P22 but when I am stood up there playing an acoustic song I want visuals to match the sound.
                Cheers Steve
                Cheers Steve
                my website http://www.macthehat.com/

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                • #9
                  Why do you have to play an acoustic? There's no rule saying you have to.


                  A 335 style guitar is a nice half step between a solid body electric and an acoustic.
                  <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park&quot;</div><br>

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                  • #10
                    A varigrip and lighter strings to build up stamina. Use 2 fingers to do bends.
                    Phil Said<br><br>If you possess the superior intellect, then it should be no problem for you to point out the logical fallacies and other problems of their position or post without having to debase yourself by resorting to ad hominem attacks.<br><br>

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                    • #11
                      A 335 style guitar is a nice half step between a solid body electric and an acoustic.


                      I've seen solos use something along that line or even a Strat. But if real acoustic tone is the goal, gotta start playing one regularly to build up those fingers and hands. Electric guitarists should practice on an acoustic once in a while for the same reason. But finding an acoustic that has the action of an electric would be great. Lighter strings can cause fret buzz and loss of good tone. There's a happy medium (gauge string) that will make playing acoustic enjoyable.
                      Winner of best guitarist in the house. (my house)!

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                      • #12
                        My only advice is to find a guitar that's easy on your hands and fingers. You do not want to create a physical problem doing something your body objects to. I make it a point to choose guitars and set ups that are easy on my hands. I had a "small" issue a few years ago and want to avoid a repeat at any cost - even if the sound has to suffer a little bit.

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                        • #13
                          I have an Epiphone Dot, which is essentially a 335. I've used it solo but it really has too much sustain for finger-picking and I'd prefer a flat-top for strumming (if I strummed). Those guitars are solid down the middle, so they're closer to solid than hollow. But a true electric archtop would be just lovely for finger-style playing.

                          Hi Mom!

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                          • #14
                            Brand doesn't matter. Just get it set up with light strings and low action to your liking.
                            Wood doesn't matter that much IMO based on your stated usage, plywood is just fine or prob better for your purposes.
                            Pickup system is primary. Get good electronics no matter what. I recc going aftermarket for that, as lower end gits usually have really crappy electronics.
                            I love my Baggs M1A soundhole. Plenty acoustic sounding, no feedback. Sound ok no matter what you plug it into, be it a PA or acoustic amp.
                            It will do better than a piezo even into a reg guitar amp of some kind.

                            Rock n Roll.

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                            • #15
                              Man up. Get an acoustic made of solid wood, install a pickup system, and set it up well. Acoustic modelers more often than not sound brutal(piezo pickup electrics includes), unless theyre in the hands of someone who REALLY knows how to setup a good PA system/amp for the guitar
                              <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.thedonksband.com" target="_blank">http://www.thedonksband.com</a><br />
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