Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do requests REALLY mean?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse







X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    That's part of our (job). to let people talk to us like they know us and interact. It makes them feel good and that makes us feel good I hope. We all deal with the drunks but I think mostly our position is to let folks forget about there day to day shyte.
    <div class="signaturecontainer"><img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/wave.gif" border="0" alt="" title="wave" class="inlineimg" /></div>

    Comment


    • #17






      Quote Originally Posted by davebols
      View Post

      That's part of our (job). to let people talk to us like they know us and interact. It makes them feel good and that makes us feel good I hope. We all deal with the drunks but I think mostly our position is to let folks forget about there day to day shyte.




      Well said!
      God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

      Comment


      • #18
        People can request all they want and I'll play whatever it is I can for them.
        <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.justdarrell.com" target="_blank">Just Darrell Web Site</a></div>

        Comment


        • #19
          If you stand on stage long enough, the people will tell you what they want to hear.



          If you want to remain on stage long enough, you should learn the most frequently requested songs.




          Sure there are rare exceptions, but in our gigs most of the time a request means "I like the way you sound and I would really like to hear you play one of my favorites songs."



          If we don't know the song, we always compliment the requester on his/her choice and try to get something close. ("I'm sorry, that's a great song but we don't know how to play it yet. How about ______ by the same artist?" - or in the same style).



          This is not a classroom or a monolog. The band and the audience should be a team, it's a dialog.



          We collect requests, learn the ones that are requested the most and Leilani and I have been working as a duo steadily since 1985 playing music as our primary source of income.



          Notes
          Bob "Notes" Norton
          Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
          Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box and add on styles for Microsoft SongSmith
          The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

          Comment


          • #20
            I don't mind requests if they make sense, but if someone walks up to you in a blues club, hands you a $5 bill and asks for 'Moves Like Jagger'...you gotta look at them as though they are totally clueless.



            We came up with a solution years ago. When someone requests a song, and we don't want to do it, we announce that the club owner docks us $100 if we play that song...
            _"We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminant period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

            Comment


            • #21






              Quote Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
              View Post

              If you stand on stage long enough, the people will tell you what they want to hear. If you want to remain on stage long enough, you should learn the most frequently requested songs.



              Sure there are rare exceptions, but in our gigs most of the time a request means "I like the way you sound and I would really like to hear you play one of my favorites songs." If we don't know the song, we always compliment the requester on his/her choice and try to get something close. ("I'm sorry, that's a great song but we don't know how to play it yet. How about ______ by the same artist?" - or in the same style).



              This is not a classroom or a monolog. The band and the audience should be a team, it's a dialog.



              We collect requests, learn the ones that are requested the most and Leilani and I have been working as a duo steadily since 1985 playing music as our primary source of income.



              Notes




              +1
              <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.justdarrell.com" target="_blank">Just Darrell Web Site</a></div>

              Comment


              • #22
                That's one kind of gig, but not the only one. There's also the kind where you play what you want, and hopefully, the people enjoy that as well. The "team" to me is the other players on stage, working together to create a feeling that the audience can relate to and appreciate. We try to reach them through the expression in our playing, and the groove we create, as opposed to playing a specific song they might want to hear. In that situation, it's not a dialog, it's a concert.













                Quote Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
                View Post

                If you stand on stage long enough, the people will tell you what they want to hear.



                If you want to remain on stage long enough, you should learn the most frequently requested songs.




                Sure there are rare exceptions, but in our gigs most of the time a request means "I like the way you sound and I would really like to hear you play one of my favorites songs."



                If we don't know the song, we always compliment the requester on his/her choice and try to get something close. ("I'm sorry, that's a great song but we don't know how to play it yet. How about ______ by the same artist?" - or in the same style).



                This is not a classroom or a monolog. The band and the audience should be a team, it's a dialog.



                We collect requests, learn the ones that are requested the most and Leilani and I have been working as a duo steadily since 1985 playing music as our primary source of income.



                Notes




                Comment


                • #23
                  I don't think we've covered this one:



                  13} I was busy talking and didn't hear you play Johnny B. Goode (or fill in the blank). However, on a subliminal level it reminded me how much I like that tune so now that you've just finished the song, I'm here to request it. Furthermore, I will get mad, defensive and refuse to believe you when you say you've JUST played that song.



                  I've had that occur dozens of times over the years.



                  I've had

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    this presents the performer with that rare and elusive "teachable moment" for the members of the audience...



                    whenever anyone requests a particular number, it allows me to explain ( over the microphone) to them the difference between a "bonafide and legitimate request" and the lesser "suggestion"...



                    a "suggestion" is when someone walks up and asks for a particular tune...please understand that this tune may or may not get played because this is merely by definition "simply a suggestion"... whereas an actual "request" is generally accompanied by a twenty dollar bill or better with the larger denominations receiving attention commensurate with the amount deposited into the tip jar...
                    poast something...

                    Comment


                    • #25






                      Quote Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
                      View Post

                      If you stand on stage long enough, the people will tell you what they want to hear.



                      If you want to remain on stage long enough, you should learn the most frequently requested songs.




                      Sure there are rare exceptions, but in our gigs most of the time a request means "I like the way you sound and I would really like to hear you play one of my favorites songs."



                      If we don't know the song, we always compliment the requester on his/her choice and try to get something close. ("I'm sorry, that's a great song but we don't know how to play it yet. How about ______ by the same artist?" - or in the same style).



                      This is not a classroom or a monolog. The band and the audience should be a team, it's a dialog.



                      We collect requests, learn the ones that are requested the most and Leilani and I have been working as a duo steadily since 1985 playing music as our primary source of income.



                      Notes




                      Well said.
                      God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

                      Comment


                      • #26






                        Quote Originally Posted by Voltan
                        View Post

                        this presents the performer with that rare and elusive "teachable moment" for the members of the audience...



                        whenever anyone requests a particular number, it allows me to explain ( over the microphone) to them the difference between a "bonafide and legitimate request" and the lesser "suggestion"...



                        a "suggestion" is when someone walks up and asks for a particular tune...please understand that this tune may or may not get played because this is merely by definition "simply a suggestion"... whereas an actual "request" is generally accompanied by a twenty dollar bill or better with the larger denominations receiving attention commensurate with the amount deposited into the tip jar...




                        As above...
                        God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

                        Comment


                        • #27






                          Quote Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
                          View Post

                          If you stand on stage long enough, the people will tell you what they want to hear.



                          If you want to remain on stage long enough, you should learn the most frequently requested songs.




                          Sure there are rare exceptions, but in our gigs most of the time a request means "I like the way you sound and I would really like to hear you play one of my favorites songs."



                          If we don't know the song, we always compliment the requester on his/her choice and try to get something close. ("I'm sorry, that's a great song but we don't know how to play it yet. How about ______ by the same artist?" - or in the same style).



                          This is not a classroom or a monolog. The band and the audience should be a team, it's a dialog.



                          We collect requests, learn the ones that are requested the most and Leilani and I have been working as a duo steadily since 1985 playing music as our primary source of income.



                          Notes




                          Being polite and professional never hurts.
                          <div class="signaturecontainer">Foul language is the sign of a weak mind trying to express itself forcibly. * Thankfully, my computer program masks all the foul language and changes it to @&amp;%)7#</div>

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I think most requests are a bit of 5, 6 & 7. People want to be part of the act and this is their way of having participated in the show.
                            _________________________________________________
                            band websites:
                            http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
                            https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
                            https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
                            http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

                            Comment


                            • #29






                              Quote Originally Posted by Shaster
                              View Post

                              I don't think we've covered this one:



                              13} I was busy talking and didn't hear you play Johnny B. Goode (or fill in the blank). However, on a subliminal level it reminded me how much I like that tune so now that you've just finished the song, I'm here to request it. Furthermore, I will get mad, defensive and refuse to believe you when you say you've JUST played that song.




                              I can't believe how much this happens! I thought it was just me. I usually play the song again if it's a good one that will fit the mood of the crowd. If anyone calls me on it I'll say 'Thanks for noticing/remembering, but it was that dumb-ass over there that wanted to hear it again'. Very seldom does anyone catch it (or say anything if they do), especially later in the night when they're drinking. I guess that means I'm doing my job and getting them nice and drunk!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X