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  • Youtube permissions

    Do we really have to buy the rights to put cover songs on Youtube? On one hand they have some serious sounding warnings against it, but on the other there sure are a lot of cover songs out there. What gives?

  • #2
    The ethical (and legal) answer is "yes".

    OTOH, I'm guessing that it's not well enforced, nor have I any idea of what the consequences actually are, other than removal...doesn't seem cost-effective to go after violators in court.
    God(s) bless the rest of the world(s), too

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    • #3
      yes, it's best if you do...


      please send all payments to:
      Voltan,
      Br-549 Benevolent Drive
      yes-u-can-trust-me Florida
      poast something...

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      • #4
        yes, it's best if you do...


        please send all payments to:
        Voltan,
        Br-549 Benevolent Drive
        yes-u-can-trust-me Florida


        Please send me a PM with your bank account number so I can send the payments directly to you. Don't forget to include your SSN, too (for tax purposes, of course). Mark C.
        "Good tools are expensive. Cheap tools are damned expensive."

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        • #5
          Please send me a PM with your bank account number so I can send the payments directly to you. Don't forget to include your SSN, too (for tax purposes, of course). Mark C.


          it should be in your messages now...

          i look forward to doing mire business with you and family is make me very happy too also...
          poast something...

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          • #6
            Seriously, an intentional copyright violation (which usually isn't alleged until after getting a "cease and desist" letter from the holder of the copyright) has a maximum civil penalty of $100,000 per publication. Arguably, each view on YouTube is a separate publication.

            While I assume that you don't have the sort of assets available to make such a suit against you viable, YouTube does. The copyright system pretty much leaves it up to the owners of the rights to enforce those rights via private (civil) litigation. Mark C.
            "Good tools are expensive. Cheap tools are damned expensive."

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            • #7
              Don't know for sure, but from what I've seen using the original recordings can get your video taken off. I've never had youtube question any of the covers I've submitted. Maybe if I had a lot more views it would be more noticeable. Check with youtube to make sure if you're worried about it.

              Well I went into video manager on youtube and found that 3 of my videos have the notice "matched third party content". That's 2 out of 15 covers submitted, and the 3rd vid has a short clip of a Brad Paisley song. No threats at this point.
              Winner of best guitarist in the house. (my house)!

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              • #8
                What I don't get is that in a dissertation or thesis you are allowed to summarize or quote other documented sources of information and there is no violation as long as you state your source. In music I would believe that would be the same in a live situation? Our band name is Motley Boo Boo and we play music originally composed by Motley Crue with title X from album X. Anyone on here ever had a video actually banned on youtube due to copyright infringement?

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                • #9
                  Good thing you aren't a Tribute to Prince.
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                  • #10
                    What I don't get is that in a dissertation or thesis you are allowed to summarize or quote other documented sources of information and there is no violation as long as you state your source. In music I would believe that would be the same in a live situation? Our band name is Motley Boo Boo and we play music originally composed by Motley Crue with title X from album X. Anyone on here ever had a video actually banned on youtube due to copyright infringement?


                    Copyright law recognizes the "fair use" exception that allows limited quotation in the context of scholarly, critical, or news accounts. "How much" is a fair use depends on context; lawyers make their living arguing that point. A TV clip of a high wire artist performing a stunt, where the entire (albeit rather short) stunt was broadcast was found to be a copyright violation, since it showed the entire routine (thus denying the performer the exclusive right to limit who saw it). "Samples" used in rap and hip-hop are still being fought over.

                    The typical battle is whether royalty payments are due or not. If you are interested, the Music Business forum here at HC has some good reading on copyright law and licensing/royalty obligations.

                    Mark C.
                    "Good tools are expensive. Cheap tools are damned expensive."

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                    • #11
                      Slightly OT

                      FWIW I'm doing a paper on digital piracy and I'm using all scholarly, peer reviewed, articles. I cant for the life of me find any article or statistics that show a decline in record sales because of P2P sharing or pirating of music. Its actually the opposite. The industry has actually requested the removal of DRM technology from discs.

                      I'll post my paper when it's complete if anyone cares to read it.
                      <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.justdarrell.com" target="_blank">Just Darrell Web Site</a></div>

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                      • #12
                        Most covers on YouTube fall outside the fair use rule so technically you are probably required to pay performance rights ... but ... YouTube recently negotiated blanket licenses with a number of publishers. Problem is there is no way to see whether or not your cover song infringes.
                        Don Boomer

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                        • #13
                          Slightly OT

                          FWIW I'm doing a paper on digital piracy and I'm using all scholarly, peer reviewed, articles. I cant for the life of me find any article or statistics that show a decline in record sales because of P2P sharing or pirating of music. Its actually the opposite. The industry has actually requested the removal of DRM technology from discs.

                          I'll post my paper when it's complete if anyone cares to read it.

                          I have thought about that aspect in the past. In the 'pre-digital' age, most of the artists I got excited enough about to go buy their album, I first heard on someone's mix tape. This gives new artists a lot of exposure.
                          I definitely want to read your paper.

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                          • #14
                            I have thought about that aspect in the past. In the 'pre-digital' age, most of the artists I got excited enough about to go buy their album, I first heard on someone's mix tape. This gives new artists a lot of exposure.
                            I definitely want to read your paper.


                            Cool...I'll post it in a couple of weeks.
                            <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://www.justdarrell.com" target="_blank">Just Darrell Web Site</a></div>

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                            • daddymack
                              daddymack commented
                              Editing a comment

                              Potts wrote:








                              I have thought about that aspect in the past. In the 'pre-digital' age, most of the artists I got excited enough about to go buy their album, I first heard on someone's mix tape. This gives new artists a lot of exposure. I definitely want to read your paper.


                              Cool...I'll post it in a couple of weeks.

                              I would actually appreciate it if you would post it in the 'Inside the Music Business' Forum...if you can find it...

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