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Backing Tracks

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  • #16
    LOL...I think you guys are being a little paranoid about the use of these tracks and performing with them live.


    While the probability of the men in black coming to take you away is indeed slight, it is also good to know the law so you can make an informed decision.

    Notes
    Bob "Notes" Norton
    Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
    Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box and add on styles for Microsoft SongSmith
    The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

    Comment


    • #17

      This is why you don't hear the traditional "Happy Birthday" song in so many restaurants. Without the license, it's illegal to sing it.


      "Happy Birthday To You" isn't public domain? Who owns the copyright?

      Yes, venues have to pay ASCAP fees so copyrighted music can be played there. They have to pay this simply to be able to play recorded music as well. So there aren't too many venues that don't pay this. Certainly any venue with live music is paying it.

      Where the band might be legally on the hook is performing cover tunes at private events for money where nobody else is paying a fee.
      _________________________________________________
      band websites:
      http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
      https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
      https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
      http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

      Comment


      • #18
        "Happy Birthday To You" isn't public domain? Who owns the copyright?

        Yes, venues have to pay ASCAP fees so copyrighted music can be played there. They have to pay this simply to be able to play recorded music as well. So there aren't too many venues that don't pay this. Certainly any venue with live music is paying it.

        Where the band might be legally on the hook is performing cover tunes at private events for money where nobody else is paying a fee.


        The fees aren't that expensive are they?
        Phil Said<br><br>If you possess the superior intellect, then it should be no problem for you to point out the logical fallacies and other problems of their position or post without having to debase yourself by resorting to ad hominem attacks.<br><br>

        Comment


        • #19
          The fees aren't that expensive are they?


          For a band or for a club? I don't know what a club pays annually for ASCAP. I think I heard once it was in the range of $2-3K, but I don't really know.

          ASCAP sent my band a letter awhile back because we A) have demos of us playing copyrighted covers on our website; B) use that website to make money. It had nothing to do specifically with live performance. They want a couple hundred dollars a year for the use of the material on the website.
          _________________________________________________
          band websites:
          http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
          https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
          https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
          http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

          Comment


          • #20
            The fees aren't that expensive are they?

            from ASCAP:
            "The annual rate depends on the type of business. Generally, rates are based on the manner in which music is performed (live, recorded or audio only or audio/visual) and the size of the establishment or potential audience for the music. For example, rates for restaurants, nightclubs, bars and similar establishments depend on whether the music is live or recorded, whether it's audio only or audio visual, the number of nights per week music is offered, whether admission is charged and several other factors.
            Concert rates are based on the ticket revenue and seating capacity of the facility. Rates for music used by corporations ("Music In Business") are based upon the number of employees. College and university rates are based upon the number of full time students; retail store rates depend on the number of speakers and square footage. Hotel rates are based on a percentage of entertainment expenses for live music and an additional charge if recorded music is used.
            Because ASCAP has over a hundred different licenses and rate schedules, one will likely fit your needs. ASCAP operates under the principle that similarly situated users should be treated similarly. This assures fairness and consistency in our licensing. For example, rates for restaurants of the same size, with the same use of music are the same regardless of whether the restaurant is in Oshkosh or New York City."
            so it all depends on the venue size, etc.
            _"We are currently experiencing some technical difficulties due to reality fluctuations. The elves are working tirelessly to patch the correct version of reality. Activities here have been temporarily disabled since the fundamentals of mathematics, physics and reason may be incomprehensible during this indeterminant period of instability. Normal service will be restored once we are certain as to what 'normal' is."

            Comment


            • #21
              from ASCAP:
              "The annual rate depends on the type of business. Generally, rates are based on the manner in which music is performed (live, recorded or audio only or audio/visual) and the size of the establishment or potential audience for the music. For example, rates for restaurants, nightclubs, bars and similar establishments depend on whether the music is live or recorded, whether it's audio only or audio visual, the number of nights per week music is offered, whether admission is charged and several other factors.
              Concert rates are based on the ticket revenue and seating capacity of the facility. Rates for music used by corporations ("Music In Business") are based upon the number of employees. College and university rates are based upon the number of full time students; retail store rates depend on the number of speakers and square footage. Hotel rates are based on a percentage of entertainment expenses for live music and an additional charge if recorded music is used.
              Because ASCAP has over a hundred different licenses and rate schedules, one will likely fit your needs. ASCAP operates under the principle that similarly situated users should be treated similarly. This assures fairness and consistency in our licensing. For example, rates for restaurants of the same size, with the same use of music are the same regardless of whether the restaurant is in Oshkosh or New York City."
              so it all depends on the venue size, etc.


              Wow, I had heard it was a couple of hundred dollars or so.

              I guess I need to check it out when I get time. I want to be able to play covers live, DJ, and KJ all under one business license. I guess paying the fee would also legitimize it as a business for tax purposes.
              Phil Said<br><br>If you possess the superior intellect, then it should be no problem for you to point out the logical fallacies and other problems of their position or post without having to debase yourself by resorting to ad hominem attacks.<br><br>

              Comment


              • #22
                "Happy Birthday To You" isn't public domain? Who owns the copyright?<...>


                From Wiki:

                In 1990, Warner Chappell purchased the company owning the copyright for $15 million, with the value of "Happy Birthday" estimated at $5 million. Based on the 1935 copyright registration, Warner claims that the United States copyright will not expire until 2030, and that unauthorized public performances of the song are technically illegal unless royalties are paid to it. In one specific instance on February 2010, these royalties were said to amount to $70

                I read somewhere that Warner Chappel makes over 2 million dollars per year in royalties for that song.

                It was 'written' by two sisters to the tune of a previous song, and they have both been long dead (Patty died in 1946) which to me demonstrates the excesses of the US Copyright law. 75 years after the death of the author IMHO is absurd. But I didn't make the law, the huge corporations did.

                "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini

                Hmmmmmmmmm, is this where the USA is headed?

                Insights and incites by Notes ?
                Bob "Notes" Norton
                Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box and add on styles for Microsoft SongSmith
                The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

                Comment


                • #23
                  Well, whoda thunk? Learn something new everyday and it's barely 9AM!
                  _________________________________________________
                  band websites:
                  http://www.JumpStartYourParty.com
                  https://www.gigmasters.com/Rock/Jump-Start
                  https://www.facebook.com/JumpStartYourParty
                  http://www.weddingwire.com/biz/jumps...587fe5f12.html

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I use Hit Trax MIDI Files & MP3 backing tracks. There are other sites I use but these guys have really good service.

                    http://www.hittraxMIDI.com

                    Comment


                    • Potts
                      Potts commented
                      Editing a comment

                      reviewsguy3000 wrote:
                      I use Hit Trax MIDI Files & MP3 backing tracks. There are other sites I use but these guys have really good service.

                      http://www.hittraxMIDI.com

                       

                      No offense, but those are the epitomy of horrible.


                  • #25
                    This site is incredible: http://www.guitarbackingtrack.com/
                    __________________________________________________ ___________________

                    Yamaholic --- PpP --- Old geezer with a grey beard

                    Comment


                    • loveofjazz
                      loveofjazz commented
                      Editing a comment

                      Good backing tracks are hard to come by. Some of the best that I've heard locally were created by the musicians using them.

                      I worked for years with a wedding band that used preprogrammed tracks for numerous songs. They turned out quite nice, but they were created by a musician that worked in a rhythm section regularly, and they were rehearsed with the band until the song sounded correct.

                      Performing as a solo artist with backing tracks is a potentially frustrating thing. I've done okay with live looping and a cajon, some other rhythm items, and layering of guitar...but I've wanted to move over to backing tracks so I could get in on some of the country club and resaurant work that is out there. Two of the local solo guys worked a big church gig with me last year and I gotto hear some realy, really interesting approaches. One does all of his work on his keyboard, while the other pre-records everything, converts to mp3, then loads to his main iPod and backup iPod. Both turnedout some outstanding performances, too. Real top notch stuff.

                       



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