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Female Singers and their bad attitudes - pls comment

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  • #31
    Last time I checked, singers do play a musical instrument.
    It's called: the voice.

    Just kidding.....

    If I recall correctly, PINK can't play anything and it's never been a problem for her.

    In any case, for most bands, the audience considers the singer to be the single most important person. The lead singer directly interacts with the crowd and at the end of the day, most people only remember the singer's name.

    Unless you play an instrument yourself, most people don't remember who the
    keyboardist,bassist, guitarist, or drummer are. In addition, in an era of pop
    music where session musicians record many songs, band members often become faceless.

    In a sense, this recognition leads to fame (in the sense that the singer becomes the
    image of the band) and that becomes power, which then can turn into arrogance.

    Replace a drummer or bassist and probably no one will notice.
    Replace the singer and you might want to consider changing the name of the band.

    That's the unfortunate reality today.
    If it were me, I'd fire the singer and search for a new lead singer.

    Then post a message on your Social media announcing auditions a new lead singer and go from there.

    At the end of the day, a band should be about chemistry and not about any single individual. Otherwise, that single person would be better off going solo.

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    • #32
      In my perfect world, my band consists of 5 members. All of which is me.

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      • #33
        In a perfect world EVERY singer would bring an instrument to the table.
        And EVERY member of the band would bring backing vocals to the table.
        Member: IBANEZ ACOUSTIC ASSASSINS

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        • #34
          In a perfect world EVERY singer would bring an instrument to the table.
          And EVERY member of the band would bring backing vocals to the table.
          Member: IBANEZ ACOUSTIC ASSASSINS

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          • #35
            Ok...so what's your story about female singers with bad attitude?


            Replace them

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            • #36
              I haven't had a whole lot of experience with female singers. We had one in my first band, but she only sang 2-3 songs. Had a band for nearly two years with a pretty lady as the star. She was unusually helpful and humble. Very sweet, despite her beauty and vocal ability. My wife sang two songs in a project we had three years ago. It overwhelmed her, but she definitely enjoyed the attention.

              And I had a female bassist that sang about a fourth of the songs in my band last year. Her style didn't really mesh with ours and she did have a bit of an ego. She probably thought we would crash and burn without her. We did appear to get more gigs while she was in the band, but it wasn't just for her singing. Anyway, when she pulled some stuff I didn't agree with, I decided to risk it and fired her. If anything, it has refocused our band to become what we are really all about.

              Well, I'll contend that keyboard players get slagged with owning and dragging great piles of equipment because they're expected to cover so many bases. At the very least they deserve danger pay.


              A guy I went to school with once proposed the idea of paying shares to musicians based on what they did musically. I thought that was kind of funny. I used the example of Rush and asked him if he thought Geddy Lee deserved three-fifths of the money because he sings all the songs, plays bass guitar and plays keyboards, while the other guys 'merely' play guitar and drums. He said yeah.

              So, if you divide up money based on job, that would be lead vocals, guitar, bass guitar, drums which is 25% for each job. In my trio, that would mean that since I sing 2/3rds of the songs and play guitar, while the bass player sings 1/3rd of the songs and the drummer 'only' drums (quite well too), the drummer should only get 25% of the money, the bass player should get 33.3% (25% + 8.3%) and I should get the rest at 41.67% (25% + 16.67%). If I sang lead on all the songs, I'd get 50% and the bassist would just get 25%.

              I personally feel that if the work is equally divided, everyone should get paid the same. Since that has been rare in my experience and I'm usually the one doing the bandleader duties, as well as promo, booking, equipment purchases, upkeep and rentals, I take 10% off the top and divide the remaining 90% three ways.

              When going from a four-piece to a three-piece, it's easy to feel like the drummer is doing the same work whether it's a trio or quartet, but I feel this way is fair. It also means that we have to get paid a lot more to justify having a fourth member while continuing to get our usual amount of cash (or perhaps a bit more) when sliced four ways.
              (This is my Non-Signature.)

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              • #37
                I play in a pop duo with a female singer. I play guitar, she plays bass. We have no drama. We have wine and cute matching outfits. Our significant others don't display any insecurity about our musical pursuits.

                We have a trio, but the original drummer (male) had constant personal drama. Now we book shows with whichever of our drummer friends are available, or we play as a duet.

                My point is, you can't blame drama on gender.

                I read this thread wondering ... isn't this a forum about solo and duet acts? Seems several of the posters are discussing 4 and 5 piece bands.
                #4F
                "Cherri is our resident mom/ surrogate wife/ diplomat/ arbiter of common sense...and we lubs her..."

                Triple Shot

                CNV Soundclick Page

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                • #38
                  I, personally, won't work with a singer who can't play well at the same time...too many other singer/musicians to choose from who can, and it's what everyone brings to the table...when you're 1/2 or 1/3 of the act, everyone must wear more than one hat.
                  ..........


                  In your case Terry, you are the front man when you pull in additional backup musicians so with that in mind you are correct. However, if the singer in a duo, or band with more members, is the one who keeps it all going on stage but does not play another instrument they, male or female, should be paid a commensurate share. If you own all the equipment, do all the booking & etc that share needs to be addressed when the interview takes place. However, a singer has an instrument, their voice, and to outright require an additional instrument seems to be very possibly ignoring someone who could well make a huge difference in your show and subsequent bookings and income.
                  Of course, what works for you works and that's great but keep in mind the difference in locals may well make a huge difference in the availability of multi-instrumentalists.
                  Still Kickin' cancer's ass....Blue Water Sailors of the Vietnam WarHCGB Trooper #246Psalm 19 SocietyI can't really imagine experiencing the desire for multiple women; one has proven to be taxing enough as it is.Thanks Offy

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                  • #39
                    I would like to have watched as someone tried to tell Frank Sinatra that he didn't deserve as much pay because he was "just" a singer.
                    Talking about music is like dancing about architecture. - Martin Mull

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                    • #40
                      If instruments represent body parts, they would be:

                      Singer - boobs/chest
                      Keyboard - head
                      Guitar - penis/vagina
                      Drums - arms and feet
                      Bass - booty

                      Naturally, singers are gonna be the first (and often only) thing people notice.
                      Keyboardists will be praised by cerebral intellectuals.
                      Guitarists get the groupies.
                      Drummers are the support and foundation and so are invisible and taken for granted.
                      Bassists will have fans that don't understand why singers are so popular.

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                      • #41
                        Female Singers and their bad attitudes - pMs comment

                        Let her know that she is replaceable. Everybody is aren't they? She could start her own band, buy a PA, truck to carry equipment, replace musicians with bad attitudes, plan rehearsals, arrange songs, find gigs etc.
                        BD

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                        • #42
                          I would like to have watched as someone tried to tell Frank Sinatra that he didn't deserve as much pay because he was "just" a singer.


                          Sinatra's relationship with Tommy Dorsey was troubled, because of their contract, which awarded Dorsey one-third of Sinatra's lifetime earnings in the entertainment industry. In January 1942, Sinatra recorded his first solo sessions without the Dorsey band (but with Dorsey's arranger Axel Stordahl and with Dorsey's approval)...
                          Hi Mom!

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                          • #43
                            Divas or Divos - it doesn't matter - they are not welcome in my band.

                            No matter how popular you are, even if you are as popular as Elvis Presley or Aretha Franklin were, you are just a singer. Same goes for other musicians.

                            Many years ago our band was hired to play backup for a lead singer. Male, good looking, great voice, wonderful stage presence, and a brother manager. The guy was a divo and as far as his brother was concerned, could do no wrong, even if he didn't sing the song in the same arrangement that he asked for the day before.

                            We made it about 4 practice sessions and told the brother it just won't work out and went our separate ways.

                            Later on we found out he was a rising star in Las Vegas who got "kicked out of town" because of his divo attitude.

                            Nobody in the band is more important than anyone else, and the audience is more important than everybody in the band.

                            Insights and incites by Notes ?
                            Bob "Notes" Norton
                            Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
                            Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box and add on styles for Microsoft SongSmith
                            The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<

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                            • #44

                              But every time ... EVERY TIME, the female singer in the duo starts lobbying to get more songs. First, it's a covert effort during set-list arrangement. Then I point out the discrancy and it's, "Oh, sorry..."

                              Then it turns more overt. "I think that I would sound better singing that song.", trying to get the band to help her "steal" songs she likes away. Not knowing that when she isn't around, sometimes audience members tell the band that I'm the better singer, and the band would sound better if I sang more.

                              Then it becomes blatant. I have had a female co-singer just launch into the vocal on one of my songs at a gig. Wow.

                              Maybe if I worked in a duo with another male singer, I would encounter the same behavior? I don't know.


                              God, I love being a solo act.


                              Funny, even before I read your post I was going to say... the biggest difference between male and female singers I have found is that with a "psycho" male singer, I will know right away. The first moment I meet a full tilt ego guy, I know immediately. With female singers I have found that it takes time. They test the waters, see who's strong and who is weak, and then (if they are diva's) they strike; with a vengeance.

                              Naturally I have worked with many wonderful female and male singers, but I've usually found the nutty females are like sleeper agents, while their male counterparts are like visible wierdos with a big sign that says "hire me at your own risk".

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                              • #45
                                Funny, even before I read your post I was going to say... the biggest difference between male and female singers I have found is that with a "psycho" male singer, I will know right away. The first moment I meet a full tilt ego guy, I know immediately. With female singers I have found that it takes time. They test the waters, see who's strong and who is weak, and then (if they are diva's) they strike; with a vengeance.

                                Naturally I have worked with many wonderful female and male singers, but I've usually found the nutty females are like sleeper agents, while their male counterparts are like visible wierdos with a big sign that says "hire me at your own risk".



                                I hate to say it, but I can relate.

                                The problem-child guy singers throw off a palpable "steer clear" vibe right away. I can spot the raging 'tude from a d-bag male singer almost instantly.
                                Talking about music is like dancing about architecture. - Martin Mull

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