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  • #61
    Bummer. I can't think of anything to write tonight.

    Does anyone have any special requests?



    Forever,




    Kim.
    The Composition Thread is sticky!
    There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

    Comment


    • #62
      Some insight on classical theory (if available) would be very nice - and some of the motivations behind it, too.
      "Part of an instrument is what it can do, and part of it is what you do to it" - Suzanne Ciani, 197x.
      Synthesizer Programming Megathread - add your tips & tricks or ask how to recreate sounds!

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Yoozer
        Some insight on classical theory (if available) would be very nice - and some of the motivations behind it, too.


        Any particular area of classical theory? Where do you want me to start?

        Forever,




        Kim.
        The Composition Thread is sticky!
        There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Jeez
          Bummer. I can't think of anything to write tonight.

          Does anyone have any special requests?




          Yeah Jeez, I want your thoughts on harmony. Pop harmony compared to jazz harmony. Jazz harmony- meaning compositions that are derived from developed theoritical studies; a "school-learned" approach, if you will. Pop harmony - meaning compositions that follow no particular "schooled" approach and are derived from popular cultural trends.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by iamthenumber
            its fun to take this to the extreme, and become outright confrontational with it. like dropping a half beat off the end of every 7th measure of a 4 on the floor house song - watch the dancing fools get very uncomfortable

            Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom Boom BoBoom Booom Boom Boom....

            LOL
            "Don't sell your life! Do whatever you really want to do. You must act as the master of your life, and then become free. No matter how difficult it is, no matter how unsuccessful it might seem, do whatever you want!"
            -- Michio Kushi

            The only way to settle questions of an ideological nature or controversial issues among the people is by the democratic method, the method of discussion, of criticism, of persuasion and education, and not by the method of coercion or repression.
            -- Mao Zedong

            Comment


            • #66
              Hmm. Harmony. Classical harmony. Jazz harmony. Pop harmony.

              Well, first of all I should say that I hardly know anything about jazz harmony. Only two things: Use Seventh Chords Everywhere, and The Circle Of Fifths Is Your Bible.



              Having said that, I'll focus on basic classical harmony, and how it relates to pop music. I'm not an expert on harmony, so I might say something that isn't quite right (or even outright wrong). If anyone knows any better than I do, I'd be happy for them to educate me.

              To begin, I'll give a brief history of harmony.


              Ah hell, I'm too tired. I've gotta get started on this thread before midnight.


              Sorry again. I feel like I've let you all down.


              Forever,




              Kim.
              The Composition Thread is sticky!
              There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

              Comment


              • #67
                Great stuff Kim, and although I employ all this in my compositions it is good to be made aware of it all over again!

                I would like your insight into what makes a melody catchy, if you have any.

                I would also like any theory (if it exists) behind the tempo of songs. It takes me a while figuring out what speed a song (with vocals) would sounds best at. I find myself changing tempos till the end and still not satisfied. Sometimes I feel it would sound great at 100 bpm and at others at 130. And then when I listen to it a week later I figure its too slow or too fast and change it to what finally is a comfortable tempo for the song. (With just instrumental tracks be it techno or jazz its much easier, its the vocals that create trouble).

                Comment


                • #68
                  Originally posted by iamthenumber
                  Deny their expectation.

                  --------------------------------------

                  its fun to take this to the extreme, and become outright confrontational with it. like dropping a half beat off the end of every 7th measure of a 4 on the floor house song - watch the dancing fools get very uncomfortable


                  Check out this song from Radio Zumbido on Epitonic.com - it's a seriously groovin, kinda-Latin beat, but every once in a while, it a new section is preceded with a measure of 5/4! And it's done very smoothly.
                  Where would Kraftwerk be without the Beach Boys or James Brown? Where would hip-hop be without Kraftwerk?

                  - Ronan Harris

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by Jeez
                    Tonight we're going to take a look at variation and development.


                    It occurs to me that DodgingRain's comment about filter sweeps could be applicable here - using a filter sweep on a repeated part but with different settings could constitute variation (though probably not development).
                    Where would Kraftwerk be without the Beach Boys or James Brown? Where would hip-hop be without Kraftwerk?

                    - Ronan Harris

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      I have not yet read through this entire thread, but if you're at a loss for something to write about, how about percussion theory and time signatures?

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        It seems that I don't get around to updating this thread until after midnight, at which time I'm really in no state to explain The Art Of Composing.

                        So unless someone else is prepared to contribute, this thread may have to die a natural death.

                        Thankyou for listening.

                        Forever,




                        Kim.
                        The Composition Thread is sticky!
                        There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          "I love you, you love me,
                          The Composition Thread will set us free!
                          We love music oh so much,
                          We can't help but share the love!"


                          Welcome yet again to The Composition Thread! On tonight's episode, we'll take a look at Perception of time speed!

                          Some of you may have noticed that the music listening experience is often not perceived as metric time. That is, the speed of time seems to vary throughout a piece of music. Some parts seem race by as if the clock were somehow accelerated, whereas other parts feels as if they last an eternity. This is the speed of time.

                          We use the word percpetion because, while we cannot change the actual speed of time we can, through music, change our perception of the speed of time.


                          Altering our perception of speed time can be done in many more ways than simply changing tempo. But first we must ask the question: How do we percieve time?

                          Imagine for a moment that you do not wear a watch, and you cannot see any clocks or other time-measuring devices. How do you measure time?

                          You measure time by remembering events per time period.

                          Now this is not exact - "events" means anything that happens, and "time period" is your short-term memory. Both are variable. Before I move on, I'll ask you to consider two situations.

                          The first situation is that of you sitting down, doing nothing for five minutes (or even better - watching the clock!) Have you every been in this situation? Did you notice how slowly time seemed to progress?

                          The second situation is that of cleaning your messy desk in five minutes. Very busy, moving everything in its right place. Have you ever been in this situation? Did you notice that the busier you were, the faster time seemed to progress?

                          The same principal can be applied to music.

                          If you want to slow down your listeners perception of time, use less events and introduce less changes per time period.

                          If you want to speed up your listeners perception of time, use more events and introduce more changes per time period.

                          For example, we could focus on a section of music, and look at how many times the drum pattern changes, or how many chords there are, or how many notes (or note events) are in the melody.

                          It's important to note that while {more,less} events is a useful prop, controlling the rate of change is key. This is somewhat similar to the (more "classical") notion of "rate of presentation of material".

                          Another interesting way of looking at it is: Instead of measuring events+change per time period, look at time period per change. Approaching it from this angle, might count the bars between each change, or look at the length of each section. A "faster" bit of music may have more sections, each shorter; whereas a "slower" bit of music mayb have fewer sections, each longer.

                          That's all for today.

                          Forever,




                          Kim.
                          The Composition Thread is sticky!
                          There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            I may have given the impression that while I'm happy to discuss the more "philosophical" aspects of composition and music theory, I have been sidestepping the call for more "concrete" music theory.

                            The truth is that I do know a fair bit of classical theory (I am studying at university), but quite frankly, I find it boring to talk about. Concepts such as modes, scales, keys, chords, etc are nothing to talk about and the real magic is when you actually play it for yourself. It's like someone asking "How can I use oscillator sync to improve my composition skills?" Well, I can tell you what osc.sync is, or how it works, and it might take a paragraph. The rest if up to you. There's really not that much to talk about if we're discussing the more "concrete" theory.

                            But for those who need somewhere to start:

                            A pitch set is a collection of notes that you use in your composition.

                            A tonal centre is the "root note", or the base note. It's often what the bass plays (especially in techno).

                            A mode is a set of pitches in combination with a defined tonal centre, to form a restricted field in which to choose notes for your composition.

                            A scale (or key) is a pitch set of seven notes, each no more than a semitone or tone apart.

                            A chord is a collection of different pitches all played at once, often by the same instrument.

                            A Triad is a chord with three notes in it. These three notes are usually seperated by major or minor thirds.

                            Forever,




                            Kim.
                            The Composition Thread is sticky!
                            There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              What's all this semitones, thirds, whatever??

                              I'm measuring the distance between two notes.

                              A semitone is the smallest distance between two notes (on a normal keyboard instrument). For example: E to F is a semitone. C to C# is a semitone.

                              A tone is simply two semitones. C to D is a tone. F to G is a tone. B to C# is a tone.

                              Some other names:


                                Play them on any available keyboard and listen to them. You'll quickly figure out the pattern.

                                Forever,




                                Kim.
                              The Composition Thread is sticky!
                              There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Often, music that is based on scales and triads can sound harmonically simple. One way to make your sound more complex is to extend your chords.

                                An easy way to do this is to keep stacking thirds and fifths on top of your existing chords. For example, if you have a C-major chord the notes would be C, E, and G. If we wish to extend this, we could add B, then D, then F. To keep it as clean as possible, don't let any notes be less than a minor third apart - add the additional notes in the octave above.

                                Another example - you're working in F#-minor. Your triad is F#, A, C#. You could extend it by adding E, then G#, then B.

                                How do I choose these notes? Just keep alternating between major thirds and minor thirds. In the C-major example, C to E is a major third, E to G is a minor third, then G to B is a major third, then B to D is a minor third, etc, etc.

                                At first it may sound a little strange, but you'll get used to it.

                                This method is useful (I use it myself) because you still retain your tonal centre (your bassline doesn't get quaked), and the additional complexity is added gradually - meaning you can control how complex you want your chord to be. If you just want a bit of added complexity, just add the next note above. If you want more, add another note. Or another. Or another.

                                You could extend this idea by having a different instrument play the extentions. For example, you could have your favourite thick pad playing your triad, then have the extentions played by a thin airy pad in the background. This gives you more ways to balance the simple with the complex.


                                Wow. Four posts in one day. Do you think I've made up for the ones I skipped?


                                Forever,





                                Kim.
                                The Composition Thread is sticky!
                                There is no heavier burden than a great potential.- Unknown source

                                Comment













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