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  • Casio PX-110, Roland FP-2

    Hi there -

    I tried to use the search feature, but it is disabled at this time and I need advise rather quickly.

    I am shopping for a digital piano for my mother, who teaches lessons. She needs a digital piano, 88 key, fully-weighted with built-in sound, on a tight budget. I play a Yamaha S-80, and she of course likes it, but needs somthing MUCH cheaper, with the aforementioned built-in sound, and it needs to be light-weight, so she can carry it.

    She was almost settled on a Roland FP-2, for the price of about $1000. That is more than she wanted to spend, but at the time, it seemed like the best buy.
    I have been searching and researching, and I have come across the Casio PX-110 as being a very good buy, and much cheaper on the back and the budget. The best deal I have found is $498 (free shipping) including sustain pedal and stand. It weights only 26 lbs, and has built-in sound. With the fully-weighted hammer-action keys, and nothing but good reviews, it seems like the ideal choice.

    I have always thought of casio as the "fisher price" of the keyboard world (Radio Shack carries 'em) but it seems like they have made a good product here.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks!
    <div class="signaturecontainer">Jared</div>

  • #2
    I've been gigging with a 300 on stage for a couple of years, no problems.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Casio PX/Privia line has really impressed me... well, that may be in large part because I never expected much from Casio, but every time I played around with one, I've REALLY liked the tone. In fact, I would say the tone is much better than a lot of the more expensive digital pianos out there. I've never owned one so I don't know about moving it, playing out with it, etc. But the tone is (as far as I've heard) the best in its price range.
      <div class="signaturecontainer">woozle wuzzle?</div>

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      • #4
        I bought a Casio px310 about a month ago for 598.00 and hadn't really gotten around to playing it for various reasons.
        In fact I had some buyers remorse and considered selling it cause my finances were tight.
        Anyway I was able to spend about 4 hours with it the other night and came away very impressed.

        I'm classically trained and have gigged on and off in bands for about 20 years.
        My impression of the keyboard action is that it is extremely smooth and even. The weight is a little more than I would prefer but not intolerably so. The only drawback is the speed of the action when playing fast repetitions of the same note.
        Les McCann would not be able to play "Compared to What" on this keyboard, but for most pianists playing 99% of the repetoire, it would be more than adequate.

        The sound grew on me the more I played it and after playing most of the pianos in Sam Ash on my last trip to Manhattan,
        I do not believe the greater part of them, even the Yammies, are worth the extra 500 to 1000 $$$.

        I haven't played out for a while but am rehearsing tomorrow for a Christmas party next month. The idea that I finally have a decent instrument that I can easily carry and throw in the back of my car like a guitarist or a horn player has got me more excited than anything.

        Comment


        • #5
          Another Casio PX-310 user. I believe the PX-310 has the same action as the PX-110.

          I think it has better action than the Yamaha equivalent (P70). Roland FP2 is a much lighter action. I actually like it a lot, not because of its lightness, but because of the way the keys travel down. I can't describe it exactly, but it's good. Something right about the way that was designed that didn't make it to the later RD-300SX I tried.

          The Casio's action, as mentioned, is notably heavier, but it's very solid, and clearly well-designed and feels natural. You can really dig into it. I'd argue that its piano sounds better than the FP-2, but that's a matter of taste.


          By the way, a used S80 might be cheaper than you would think. I think the PX-110 would be better for this purpose though.
          <div class="signaturecontainer">--&gt;Marc<br />
          <br />
          &quot;Don't be afraid to try things&quot; -Herbie Hancock</div>

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jazzed
            Another Casio PX-310 user. I believe the PX-310 has the same action as the PX-110. .......


            I certainly hope that they do, as I plan to get the 110 really soon. Don't they have the same exact weight? It would be hard to imagine that they have different actions while keeping the same exact weight, just a $0.02 worth thought.

            Best.

            Comment


            • #7
              can you plug the casio into a p.a. and use on stage, or is it a living room keyboard only?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by geddyentwistle
                can you plug the casio into a p.a. and use on stage, or is it a living room keyboard only?


                The 310 has a line out + headphones. The 110 has headphones only.

                Best.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Around where I am, they're clearing out the Yamaha P-series to make room for the new CP's. I saw a P-70 for around $750CDN. I wouldn't be surprised if they're doing that elsewhere in North America as well.
                  <div class="signaturecontainer"><font color="White">.</font><br />
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                  <br />
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                  <br />
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                  • #10
                    I have played the PX-310 and the PX-110 side by side.
                    As far as I could tell the actions were completely identical.

                    IMHO the increased voice capability and the speaker line out are worth the extra $100.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a Roland FP-2 - I got it for $850 as a store demo about a year and a half ago. That was definitely a good buy - I bought it specifically because it is lightweight and has decent built-in speakers. I use it for cocktail hours before wedding receptions, I wanted something playable but easy to maneuver - and the built-in speakers are just insurance, in case I'm ever running too late to lug in/plug in my amp, I can turn on the FP-2 and have instant sound thru the speakers (not as loud as running thru an amp, obviously - but in a pinch it'll do).

                      The sound on the FP-2 is ok - sometimes a bit "metallic"... it's not the best piano sound on the market by far. However, for my needs it's fine - I've made some nice money with it on gigs so far, noone's complained about the sound...

                      I think the Yamaha P-series are the defacto standard for digital pianos if you're really picky about sound. The keys are a little heavy, though - that's another reason I liked the FP-2: I can play it for an hour or even 1.5 hrs. straight (sometimes cktl. hrs. run 1.5 hrs.) without getting really tired fingers or tendons. The keys are weighted but they are kind of semi-weighted: heavier than synth keys but not quite as heavy as typical dig. piano keys, like the Yam. P90 or P120.

                      <div class="signaturecontainer"><img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /> &quot;Gigito ergo sum: I gig, therefore I am.&quot; <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/cool.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Cool" class="inlineimg" /><br />
                      <font size="1"><b><u>Keys</u>:</b><br />
                      <i>Sold:</i> Yamaha S90ES, Korg Triton Le<br />
                      <i>Using:</i> Yamaha MoX8 <i>(bottom tier)</i> &amp; Korg M3 <i>(top)</i>, or just Roland RD300GX<i> (on small gigs)</i><br />
                      <i>Tried, returned:</i> Korg M50, Roland Fantom G7<br />
                      <b><u>Mixers, Spkrs.</u>:</b><br />
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                      Alesis TransActive 50, Soundcraft MFXi8, Yamaha MG82cx, Mackie ProFX12, MS1202 &amp; DFX6, <i>[Samson PL1602 - For Sale]</i><br />
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                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by C#minor
                        The 310 has a line out + headphones. The 110 has headphones only.

                        Best.


                        Hello everyone!

                        This is my first post, and please pardon me for my ignorance on the subject matter. I also recently bought a PX-110 and I did notice that there is no Output. Is there a difference in the sound quality if I use the Headphone jack instead to connect the PX-110 to an amplifier?

                        Thanks!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Welcome to the forum. I am no expert, but this question was asked before and the answer was given then IIRC was that the headphone out signal may be a little equalized (more bass) to compensate for the weak bass response of the headphone. The line-out signal is flat OTOH.
                          Also, the headphone signal is amplified, so it might run slightly hotter than the line-out.
                          For me that was not an issue at all. I connected my PX-110 to my home stereo and the sound is pretty decent, and much better than the PX own speakers (I think anything will be better than those speakers ). I can't imagine how it will sound with a nice set of active studio monitors.

                          Best.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by C#minor
                            Welcome to the forum. I am no expert, but this question was asked before and the answer was given then IIRC was that the headphone out signal may be a little equalized (more bass) to compensate for the weak bass response of the headphone. The line-out signal is flat OTOH.
                            Also, the headphone signal is amplified, so it might run slightly hotter than the line-out.
                            For me that was not an issue at all. I connected my PX-110 to my home stereo and the sound is pretty decent, and much better than the PX own speakers (I think anything will be better than those speakers ). I can't imagine how it will sound with a nice set of active studio monitors.

                            Best.


                            Thanks a lot! That was a relief. At least I know that somehow, I didn't make a wrong decision buying the PX-110.

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