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  • Yamaha P80 P-80 - How do I fix sticky keys

    Can someone please provide specific instructions on how to (i) repair one faulty key and (ii) a few sticking keys on my Yamaha P80 digital piano?

    With the 1 faulty key, I'm also considering just swapping it with the lowest (least used) key if possible, instead of buying another one.

    Would the stick keys have to be actually replaced, or can they be somehow adjusted or lubricated (Eg with WD40)?

    Thanks.

    Alan

  • #2
    Might want to check out the thread "Korg M3 keybed"; maybe this is the same problem?
    I wanna be a Noisemaker
    http://www.myspace.com/tonyraecommonground

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    • #3
      I had the same problem on my P 80. I called Yamaha tech, told them of the problem, and they authorized a new replacement keybed at no charge.

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      • #4
        I'm not all that familiar with the P80 keybed - however, the problem you described sounds exactly like the problem I had with my P200 a little while back. After looking into it I discovered that it was a latent defect (something to do with the polymer used in the keys themselves that resulted in the "pivot point" at the rear of the key deteriorating - and behaving in the manner you described).

        The problem was communicated to their field support folks in Yamaha Service Bulletin # 1468 1/3.

        I was directed to contact one of the local "Authorized Servicer" who replaced the entire keybed at no charge.

        I can't say for certain that this would apply to your situation - but it's sure worth looking into. Mine started with the "D" above middle "C" and spread to several others before I had it replaced. It ain't gonna get any better on it's own! Don't

        Good Luck!
        The SpaceNorman

        www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
        www.souldoutrocks.com

        Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
        Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
        Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

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        • #5
          How do I fix sticky keys


          Don't spill drinks over your board

          On a serious note you may want to take the board apart, and wipe the keybed down.

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          • #6
            I had a similar problem with a mint Korg 01/w I purchased a while back. It seems that Korg (and others) had a problem with some of their old lube jobs getting sticky with age (there's a joke in there somewhere ) causing sticky or sluggish keys.

            After searching and finding a link explaining the problem, I took apart the keybed key-by-key (yes, very scary ) and cleaned off the old crappy lube and re-oiled it with 3-in-1 oil.

            It works like new now.
            I synth, therefore I am.

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            • #7
              SpaceNorman said: the problem you described sounds exactly like the problem I had with my P200 a little while back. After looking into it I discovered that it was a latent defect (something to do with the polymer used in the keys themselves that resulted in the "pivot point" at the rear of the key deteriorating - and behaving in the manner you described).
              __________________________________________________ ______________
              The "latent defect" is the reason that Yamaha has been so good about replacing the keybeds on many of their models. I watched the tech replace the keybed on my P-80 and he showed me where the the breakdowns were occuring resulting in the keys either sticking or not returning to the upright position after being depressed. Call Yamaha before you do any other repairs or even open the case. You will probably be elgible for the keybed replacement.

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              • #8
                My 7 year old Yamaha P200 was also having a few problematic "sticky" keys. Yamaha told me that it's a lubrication issue. Yamaha also told me they would send me a brand new keypad at no charge to me! I put an exclamation point on the previous sentence because the P200 keypad retails for $600 plus another $85 for delivery. So hats off to Yamaha for their excellent support. Please note that your keyboard has to qualify, so call Yamaha and provide them with your keyboard's serial number.

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                • #9
                  After putting up with 4 sluggish sometimes stuck keys on my P80 for 3 years I finally took it apart. There were eight keys with little fractured off pieces at the pivot point that I assumed were jamming or rubbing in some way so with them removed I thought I would be good to go and was for about one minute. Apart again I deduced that it was simply too much white grease on the little rubber contact point and the weighted mechanism. Just needed to wipe the pad but I can see that perhaps in some cases you would need to wipe, reassemble, take out and wipe again if there is waaaaay too much grease instead of just too much. I believe it is sort of a vacuum/suction sort of thing that prevents free movement.

                  This is not a job for anyone who is not a tinkerer. Once the cover is off (ton of screws but only the large ones)examine the very last bass key to get an idea of how it works before you start. There is a tang that will release the pivot point of the key when you slide a thin kitchen knife between the keys, pushing down ever so slightly, feeling for a springy resistance rather than solid stop feel, as you pull up on the pivot end of the key. Solid stop/resistance feel means you're on the wrong side of the key. Tang is only on one of the sides.

                  Removing the key entirely is a bit dodgey. It feels like you're going to break it and reassymbling is even harder but it is in at pivot point first. Then holding down the actual weight, once you've determined which one wants to lift, pushing the exposed end of the key down hard enough to pass the connection point. You can possibly knock the little rubber pad off in this process and that's going to mean taking the bugger back out.

                  Again if you're not what's commonly referred to as "handy" I wouldn't recommend undertaking this.

                  My dictum is: "Anything can be fixed if you fool with it long enough."

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                  • #10
                    After putting up with 4 sluggish sometimes stuck keys on my P80 for 3 years I finally took it apart. There were eight keys with little fractured off pieces at the pivot point that I assumed were jamming or rubbing in some way so with them removed I thought I would be good to go and was for about one minute. Apart again I deduced that it was simply too much white grease on the little rubber contact point and the weighted mechanism. Just needed to wipe the pad but I can see that perhaps in some cases you would need to wipe, reassemble, take out and wipe again if there is waaaaay too much grease instead of just too much. I believe it is sort of a vacuum/suction sort of thing that prevents free movement.

                    This is not a job for anyone who is not a tinkerer. Once the cover is off (ton of screws but only the large ones)examine the very last bass key to get an idea of how it works before you start. There is a tang that will release the pivot point of the key when you slide a thin kitchen knife between the keys, pushing down ever so slightly, feeling for a springy resistance rather than solid stop feel, as you pull up on the pivot end of the key. Solid stop/resistance feel means you're on the wrong side of the key. Tang is only on one of the sides.

                    Removing the key entirely is a bit dodgey. It feels like you're going to break it and reassymbling is even harder but it is in at pivot point first. Then holding down the actual weight, once you've determined which one wants to lift, pushing the exposed end of the key down hard enough to pass the connection point. You can possibly knock the little rubber pad off in this process and that's going to mean taking the bugger back out.

                    Again if you're not what's commonly referred to as "handy" I wouldn't recommend undertaking this.

                    My dictum is: "Anything can be fixed if you fool with it long enough."

                    Actually, it's extremely easy to replace keys. You do NOT lock the key into the pivot point at the rear first. Instead, hook the end of the metal tang into the rear of the key, rock the key forward (past the front end of the keybed) and down (below the surface level of the other keys), slide the whole key back so that the front hooks into the hammer mechanism underneath, and THEN snap the rear into place. It works very easily, and there's no danger of breaking anything.

                    Unfortunately, Yamaha did send me a replacement keybed for my P80, but it has a number of slow, off-center keys. When I first called they told me too bad. ****************************s. I'mma call them again since it's been getting worse.
                    Joshua Seth (that's me) at the keys...

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                    • #11
                      I saw someone posted pics of taking the P80 apart. They're no longer available. Is there some way of me getting a hold of them?

                      Yamaha is sending me a replacement set of keys. The pics would be a lot of help.

                      Thanks,
                      Bill

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