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Does CC stand for Control Change?

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  • Does CC stand for Control Change?

    Is that what CC stands for? Control Change?

  • #2
    continuous control.
    check out my music!
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    • #3
      continuous control.


      When I see MIDI CC it means Continuous Control?

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      • #4
        continuous control.


        When I see MIDI CC#2 it means Continuous Control #2?

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        • #5
          When I see MIDI CC#2 it means Continuous Control #2?


          Actually, I believe it's continuous controller.
          -------------------------------
          Michael
          Jupiter-50, MOX6, TI Polar, Moog LP, Korg Micro X, JV-1080
          27" iMac, DP 7.24, Omnisphere, Alchemy, many more...
          http://www.youtube.com/keybdwizrd

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          • #6
            It's control change.

            http://www.midi.org/techspecs/gm.php

            Control Change Messages (Some Optional)
            - Bank Select (cc#0/32)
            - Modulation Depth (cc#1)
            - Portamento Time (cc#5)
            - Channel Volume (cc#7)
            - Pan (cc#10)
            - Expression (cc#11)
            - Hold1 (Damper) (cc#64)
            - Portamento ON/OFF (cc#65)
            - Sostenuto (cc#66)
            - Soft (cc#67)
            - Filter Resonance (Timbre/Harmonic Intensity) (cc#71)
            - Release Time (cc#72)
            - Attack time (cc#73)
            - Brightness (cc#74)
            - Decay Time (cc#75) (new message)
            - Vibrato Rate (cc#76) (new message)
            - Vibrato Depth (cc#77) (new message)
            - Vibrato Delay (cc#78) (new message)
            - Reverb Send Level (cc#91)
            - Chorus Send Level (cc#93)
            - Data Entry (cc#6/38)
            - RPN LSB/MSB (cc#100/101)
            Response from John from American Musical Supply on why I have received 2 used/damaged Korg M3's and 1 reboxed M3 from Guitar Center (a.k.a. why I'll never buy from AMS again): Footfall wrote:What you're experiencing with these units is the result of our warehouse crew intentionally "overpacking" this product.Current Korg Gear: KRONOS 88 (4GB), M50-73 (PS mod), RADIAS-73, Electribe MX, Triton Pro (MOSS, SCSI, CF, 64MB RAM), DVP-1, MEX-8000, MR-1, KAOSSilator, nanoKey, nanoKontrol, nanoPAD 2

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            • #7
              It's control change.

              http://www.midi.org/techspecs/gm.php


              Well, it would seem that either term is accurate. On the same site, see the MIDI glossary at:

              http://www.midi.org/aboutmidi/glossary.php

              "CONTINUOUS CONTROLLER: A MIDI message tailored to parameters that require a range of multiple values such as modulation depth or volume. CCs can be controlled in real time by knobs, sliders, wheels, etc. or can be input as a series of parameter values into a MIDI sequence."
              -------------------------------
              Michael
              Jupiter-50, MOX6, TI Polar, Moog LP, Korg Micro X, JV-1080
              27" iMac, DP 7.24, Omnisphere, Alchemy, many more...
              http://www.youtube.com/keybdwizrd

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              • #8
                ah damn. no wonder my knobs don't work I was calling them continuous controllers. now i have to remap everything
                Give me my moog, but **** off you american techno rockstar! people in countries I've never been to do it better than you!

                Computer Music Guide

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                • #9
                  A typical device with MIDI has certain "Continuous Controllers".
                  Examples:
                  Continuous Controller #1 = Modulation Wheel
                  Continuous Controller #2 = Breath Control
                  Continuous Controller #7 = Volume

                  MIDI data that can change the parameter value of those controllers are "Control Change" messages. People tend to refer to either "Continuous Controller" or "Control Change" as "CC".

                  CC messages are of the form "Status Byte - First Data Byte - Second Data Byte". In decimal, the status byte for a CC command can be any one from 176 through 191, with 176 being for MIDI channel 1 and 191 for channel 16. The first data byte is the controller number. The second data byte is the value (which can range from 0 to 127) for that controller.
                  Examples (in decimal):
                  176 1 63 ---- For MIDI channel 1, set the modulation wheel value to a mid-point
                  180 7 127 --- For MIDI channel 5, set volume to maximum

                  Due to all that and for other reasons, I tend to keep my (5-pin) DIN plugged IN (although lately it's also USB, Ethernet, ...).

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                  • #10
                    Cool, that explains things.

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                    • #11
                      A typical device with MIDI has certain "Continuous Controllers".
                      Examples:
                      Continuous Controller #1 = Modulation Wheel
                      Continuous Controller #2 = Breath Control
                      Continuous Controller #7 = Volume

                      MIDI data that can change the parameter value of those controllers are "Control Change" messages. People tend to refer to either "Continuous Controller" or "Control Change" as "CC".

                      CC messages are of the form "Status Byte - First Data Byte - Second Data Byte". In decimal, the status byte for a CC command can be any one from 176 through 191, with 176 being for MIDI channel 1 and 191 for channel 16. The first data byte is the controller number. The second data byte is the value (which can range from 0 to 127) for that controller.
                      Examples (in decimal):
                      176 1 63 ---- For MIDI channel 1, set the modulation wheel value to a mid-point
                      180 7 127 --- For MIDI channel 5, set volume to maximum

                      Due to all that and for other reasons, I tend to keep my (5-pin) DIN plugged IN (although lately it's also USB, Ethernet, ...).


                      Could you explain a bit how it works with NRPN values? From what I gather, you use CCs 98 and 99 to tell everyone that you've got some NRPN values coming up, and somehow you use CC's 38 and 6 to represent the data portion...? Thanks.

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                      • #12
                        Could you explain a bit how it works with NRPN values? From what I gather, you use CCs 98 and 99 to tell everyone that you've got some NRPN values coming up, and somehow you use CC's 38 and 6 to represent the data portion...? Thanks.

                        Yes, I could explain it, but a short Google search turned up this:
                        http://www.cakewalk.com/support/Docs/RPNandNRPN.asp

                        I think that explanation is pretty thorough, but if you still have questions after reading it, just ask.

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                        • #13
                          It's control change.

                          Yes. While MIDI does support continuous controllers, CC messages are Control Change messages. Evidence of the logic of that are
                          - Hold1 (Damper) (cc#64)
                          - Portamento ON/OFF (cc#65)
                          which are control changes for simple on/off functions, and not continuous over a 1-127 range. (I'm talking about the traditional use of #64 for the past 30 years, before the more recent expansion to support of half-pedaling.)

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                          • #14
                            See MIDI Manufacturers Association info, Table 3 - Control Change Messages, including for NRPN #98,99,6,38:
                            http://www.midi.org/techspecs/midimessages.php

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                            • #15

                              - Hold1 (Damper) (cc#64)
                              - Portamento ON/OFF (cc#65)
                              which are control changes for simple on/off functions, and not continuous over a 1-127 range. (I'm talking about the traditional use of #64 for the past 30 years, before the more recent expansion to support of half-pedaling.)

                              Yes, but to clarify this -- the entire range of 0-127 can be used even for those that only have two possible states. The MIDI spec says that a value of 63 or less should be interpreted as "off", while 64 or greater should be "on". More typically, people tend to use 0 (zero) for "off" and 127 for "on", and less often the intermediate values.

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