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  • #31
    To be honest, after having tried a the RD-300GX and the FP7, I don't think the Roland sound is for me. I decided to go with a Yamaha. The P80 might be a little too old, I'm afraid I am going to be disappointed with the sound, so I'm considering the CP33 and trying to find the best deal on one here in Europe. The main problem is that I won't be able to try neither of the boards before I buy them. I've tried several Yamahas, but not these.


    Sound is tricky since typically you dont get to run them though a gig rig. I dont think headphones, or the little monitors you see at music stores really give you a good demo of what a board sounds like live. Yamaha makes good gear ,, in most of the pro level gear sounds good ,,, action is most of what you can get a feel for in the store.
    "you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park"

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    • #32
      I tried all the models with my headphones, which are entry level audiophiles (Alessandro MS-1i). As I will be playing 99% of the time trough them, it makes sense to use them for try outs. Anyway, I think this Yamaha vs Roland pianos is quite personal. IMO, Yamaha is best for pianos, but each to its own.

      From what I've been reading, there are two flaws on the CP33: no music stand (??) and no sequencer. It would be fun to record a bass line and play over it, but I won't base my decision on that.

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      • #33
        I tried all the models with my headphones, which are entry level audiophiles (Alessandro MS-1i). As I will be playing 99% of the time trough them, it makes sense to use them for try outs. Anyway, I think this Yamaha vs Roland pianos is quite personal. IMO, Yamaha is best for pianos, but each to its own.

        From what I've been reading, there are two flaws on the CP33: no music stand (??) and no sequencer. It would be fun to record a bass line and play over it, but I won't base my decision on that.


        Good idea on the headphones - if they are what you'll use the most, then definitely use 'em to audition the different model dig. pianos before buying.

        As for your indicated "flaws" - a music stand (built-in to the digital piano) and a sequencer should prob'ly be LAST on your checklist of necessary features...
        "Gigito ergo sum: I Gig, therefore I Am."


        Keys:
        Yamaha MotifXF6 - (bottom tier) & Korg M361 (top)
        Roland RD300GX (88 keys - smaller gigs & when I play left hand bass)

        Mixers, Spkrs.:
        (2) QSC K12's, (2) QSC K10's, (2) QSC K8's
        1 JBL PRX715XLF Subwoofer
        Motion Sound KP200S & KP100S kybd. amps (rarely use any more)
        Allen & Heath MixWiz3, Soundcraft MFXi8, Yamaha MG82cx,
        Mackie ProFX12, Alesis TransActive 50, [Samson PL1602 - For Sale]
        Fender Rumble 100 Bass Amp (for Ibanez SR500 Bass)

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        • #34
          Those flaws are definitely last on the list. I mentioned them because the lack of music stand is incomprehensible and, like the lack of a sequencer, a step back from the P90, which the CP33 replaced. I understand they must put extra features on the CP300, but that was a nice one to have.

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          • #35
            I would never recommend the P80 to anyone..

            Me neither. Really - stay away from this one. You can easily hear the sample break points, notes don't have that characteristic Yamaha ringing sustain to them and decay artificially rapidly... all the artifacts of a budget piano from 10 years ago are in abundance on the P80.

            I don't think you're missing anything by not auditioning the CP33. I remember A/Bing it and the P85 (which was less than 1/2 it's price) back to back a couple of years ago (the were on the same stand plugged into the same amplification system) and the main piano was exactly the same in both boards.

            If I were to suggest anything it would be to audition the P95 and Casio PX3 before you buy a used digital piano. These are both terrific cheap little DPs that blow away most used stuff out there. Digital pianos keep improving so much each year that it's wise to buy new.

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            • #36
              I've played the P95 and, although it sounds very good for the price, I don't think it compares to a more professional digital piano. I found the P90 better, not counting the ringing issue. I also played a Casio, I'm not sure if it was the PX130 or the 330 and, although the keys felt good, the piano sound is not impressive at all. Thank you for your help

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              • #37
                Have you thought of using a StudioLogic SL-990 XP or SL-990 Pro, along with the module of your choice? They have a great action, and it's hard to beat $380 w/free shipping.
                "I remember when dubstep was just called "LFO-Locked-Filter-On-Square-Wave-Bass-Synth" in the '60s" - Alan Parsons

                Kurzweil PC3♦Alesis Fusion 6HD♦Alesis Quadrasynth+Piano (3)♦Alesis QS7.1 (2)♦Alesis QSR♦ Alesis S4+♦Alesis DMPRO♦Evolution MK-461C♦Rhodes Mark II Stage 73♦Roland JX-8P♦Kawai K1 & K1m♦

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                • #38
                  get the CP33, no brainer.
                  looks good, weight is ok, yamaha CFIII samples like the Motif XS, studio grade outputs

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                  • #39
                    Good idea on the headphones - if they are what you'll use the most, then definitely use 'em to audition the different model dig. pianos before buying.

                    As for your indicated "flaws" - a music stand (built-in to the digital piano) and a sequencer should prob'ly be LAST on your checklist of necessary features...


                    If you want a music stand buy a real good one ,, anything you are going to find on the typical stage piano is gonna be a toy anyway.
                    "you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park"

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Have you thought of using a StudioLogic SL-990 XP or SL-990 Pro, along with the module of your choice? They have a great action, and it's hard to beat $380 w/free shipping.

                      I don't think modules are a good choice if I only want piano sounds. Yamaha and Kurzweil had dedicated piano modules, I think, but they have been discontinued and there's no obvious advantage, because the keys in top of the line stage pianos are normally good. I favor the more simple 1 keyboard setup, and I'm in Europe, but thanks for the suggestion.

                      I'll probably get the CP33. About the stand, since I don't play classical music that often, a normal keyboard stand would suit me; I only put one or two sheets at a time, normally.

                      Thank you very much for the help, everyone.

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                      • #41
                        Unfortunately, that's true. Within Europe you should be able to access K&M stuff pretty easily

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                        • #42
                          I have to say I wasn't much impressed with the CP50, particularly with the main piano. And this new CP line is very confusing; the panel is not obvious and, on the CP1, I couldn't get any other sound besides the piano, which is very good. I'm a noob in what regards tweaking, though, but I find simplicity important for a piano directed for live playing.

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                          • #43
                            I don't think modules are a good choice if I only want piano sounds. Yamaha and Kurzweil had dedicated piano modules, I think, but they have been discontinued and there's no obvious advantage, because the keys in top of the line stage pianos are normally good. I favor the more simple 1 keyboard setup, and I'm in Europe, but thanks for the suggestion.

                            I'll probably get the CP33. About the stand, since I don't play classical music that often, a normal keyboard stand would suit me; I only put one or two sheets at a time, normally.

                            Thank you very much for the help, everyone.



                            It just seems to me that if you are looking for a great action and a great piano sound, it's easier to get both by buying them individually. If you really like the action of the Studiologic, you can pair it with the piano sound you want, whether a module, or a software synth. But good luck!
                            "I remember when dubstep was just called "LFO-Locked-Filter-On-Square-Wave-Bass-Synth" in the '60s" - Alan Parsons

                            Kurzweil PC3♦Alesis Fusion 6HD♦Alesis Quadrasynth+Piano (3)♦Alesis QS7.1 (2)♦Alesis QSR♦ Alesis S4+♦Alesis DMPRO♦Evolution MK-461C♦Rhodes Mark II Stage 73♦Roland JX-8P♦Kawai K1 & K1m♦

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                            • #44
                              You are right about software synths, but I don't know about modules when compared to (relatively) recent stage pianos. And I hope the Yamaha action is not disappointing. Thanks.

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                              • #45
                                I don't think it will be. I would describe it as medium-heavy, so it requires some effort but still permits to play pianissimo. I would also rate the 33 higher than the Fatar / Studiologic actions

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