Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Andromeda Troubleshooting

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Thanks guys, I tried dancing around with all the program and patch change buttons, and all the rest actually, No change. I also had the unit fired up all night when I first got it to 'warm' it up and change the behavior. nothing different. I am reading that the main board is what folks have done. I didn't realize I could buy it from Alesis. The inside looks pretty simple, and my background is in IT and electrical engineering, so replacing seems straight ahead based on the post of the battery replacement thread, which is pretty detailed.

    If I invest another 600 in the board, is there a way through some test that I could be more certain its that board? Is there a logical reason based on being stuck on that screen that its the main board, and not one of the other ones. I guess I am trying to make sure I don't burn the 600 on an unscientific guess. Not looking for a guarantee just a logical path.

    Thanks for all your input on my synth drama.


    Well there's only 4 parts to the Andy... the power supply, the controller board, the analog board, and the main board. I'd think the boot up is wholly a software thing on the main board and that the other boards haven't cycled on yet at that point (if that makes sense).
    Alesis Andromeda A6, FutureRetro 777, Spectral Audio Neptune 2
    Waldorf Blofeld, Roland D-550/PG-1000, Yamaha TX-802, Korg Triton

    Comment


    • #17
      You could take a chance on just installing the mainboard yourself (after buying a replacement one); however, if you send the synth (very carefully and thoroughly packaged, as if it's going through a warzone!) to an authorized repair tech, they'll do the analysis of the problem and fix it for you with a guarantee of the work done.

      It might be a little more than the price for the replacement part, but then again the end result will be a working A6.
      A Gadibus usque ad Auroram

      Comment


      • #18
        You could take a chance on just installing the mainboard yourself (after buying a replacement one); however, if you send the synth (very carefully and thoroughly packaged, as if it's going through a warzone!) to an authorized repair tech, they'll do the analysis of the problem and fix it for you with a guarantee of the work done.

        It might be a little more than the price for the replacement part, but then again the end result will be a working A6.


        Yeah, that's the reason I sent mine to a tech... fortunately I live in a city that had one and didn't have to do any shipping.

        But, in the end, I had to wait over two months for a fix that would have taken me a week to do myself... with most of that time just waiting for Alesis to ship the part out.

        Yes, it is scary to buy a $600 part that you don't know won't fix your problem for sure, but like I said before, the Andy only has four internal boards and if buying the mainboard doesn't fix your problem I'd think it would be easy to re-sell that part on eBay in the future (especially after Alesis runs out of extras).

        The only benefit I got from using the tech was that Alesis happened to have sent them a used mainboard that had its own problems that the tech was able to discern, and they had clout to set Alesis straight in getting a new board. That was nice.
        Alesis Andromeda A6, FutureRetro 777, Spectral Audio Neptune 2
        Waldorf Blofeld, Roland D-550/PG-1000, Yamaha TX-802, Korg Triton

        Comment


        • #19
          Here is an update,
          Just wanted to update here,

          I could not find any information on the bootloader, not even from Alesis.

          I contacted the shops provided by alesis and a few others about a repair that included some level of troubleshooting to identify the actual problem and which specific board, but no luck. They all simply just replace the Main board and 'see' what happens. I couldn't get any shop to guarantee the work/price.

          I therefore purchased a main board from Alesis, which was easy enough. The price was 600 bucks, and it arrived in 2 days. Surprising was the fact that it was clearly a used board. Dirty and marked up in various ways. The board that was in my used A6 was super clean by comparison. The pins of the board from Alesis were also in bad shape, so a little prep work was needed.

          Once installed the A6 booted as expected and seems to be working well now. Need more time to complete loading patches and tuning and all that. I will update when I have logged some time on it.

          Just a note, not sure it matters, the A6 has a Left, Center, and Right upper boards, a display unit, power supply, Main board, and two analog boards on top of each other. I just wanted to clarify the amount of ribbon connected boards in the unit are more than 4. I haven't found any information on any board except for the main one failing, with the exception of a voice chip going 'bad' in the sense that it can't be tuned well enough any longer.

          I will post photos of my repair when I get an additional minute. For now I need to go through the thing to make sure all my fixing is done.

          Thanks for all the input!

          I do now have a main board that doesn't work, but would likely serve as good spare parts if a component level analysis was done.

          Comment


          • #20
            cool. thanks for the update

            Comment


            • #21
              Here are some photos of the A6

              This is one of the ribbon cables from the main board to the ASICs controller board. As you can see somebody glued inside of the connector. This wasn't possible to get completely clean I made and then replaced the cable. Most of these cables were not available in their sizes, but you can buy the ribbon and the connectors and crimp your own cable. You can also test it to make sure it works the cheapo way, by using two needles, inserted into the holes and a regular ohm meter for continuity.


              This was the other cable that went from the Main board to the Main ASICs board. It also had a lot of glue debri, but I tried cleaning it first. You can see the residue of where it was in the plug on the cable still.


              Here is a rather large photo of the Main Board. I left it a bit bigger so you could better see the individual components.


              This is the ASIC PCB with all the analog chips. It was the connection between these two boards that I suspected was causing my issue.


              This is the A6 with the above two boards removed. Its a bit blurry, but you can see that even now there are 4 specific PCB boards still in the unit, and the powersupply board. So include the two missing that would make 7. Its a very neatly laid out unit compared to other older synths, and very easy to work on/in.


              This last one is of the ASIC controller board that reside underneath the ASIC main board. This one provides all the outputs.

              Comment



              Working...
              X