Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

gigs with music stands - good or bad?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse









X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • gigs with music stands - good or bad?

    I always have a music stand. I like being able to check the set list, keys, arrangements, keyboard settings.

    Some guitarists think that is unprofessional. the people I play with don't have a problem, but what are your impressions of players that have them?
    8 pr boxers
    3 pr jeans
    7 tee shirts
    2 pr shoes

  • #2
    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/f32/pet-peeve-bands-hinding-behind-music-stands-698489/index3.html

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't imagine why anyone would have a problem with someone using a music stand? That's silly. Those people are silly.
      Hurrr. Derp, derp, derp.

      Comment


      • #4
        It depends on what the band is like. If you're playing a wedding or a corporate party, who cares, people just want to dance and drink. But can you imagine U2 playing with a music stand?
        http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

        Comment


        • #5
          Using a music stand is on a par with a keyboardist playing sitting down. Looks so unmanly.

          Comment


          • #6
            I can't imagine why anyone would have a problem with someone using a music stand? That's silly. Those people are silly.


            It can reduce the lead singer's interaction with the crowd, somewhat. And some people think they look dorky in rock and roll for some reason. That's the main minuses.
            The plus side is its a good reference; if your cover band has several hundred songs, it might be nice to help prevent you from screwing up and trainwrecking.

            I don't know when the trend began that you had to memorize everything. That certainly wasn't true 50 years ago.

            What I make with way too many blinky light modular items, plugins, and an Alesis Andromeda.
            Forbidden Star: home studio / melodic ambient / New Age / the deep zone
            Boney Fiend: the band, man / punk / garage / beer

            Comment


            • #7
              I witnessed a cover band of Parliament yesterday. The horn players were playing with a stand. Needless to say it didn't sound anything like Parliament

              Comment


              • #8
                Using a music stand is on a par with a keyboardist playing sitting down. Looks so unmanly.


                And yet I've seen so many huge pieces of cardboard taped to the floor under the guitar player crammed tight with set lists and fx settings. What's the difference?
                What I lack in quality I make up for in volume...

                ...When I became bankrupt, a guitar was something that you patched into an Evolver so it would go mmmrrreeeeeeploploplop....

                Comment


                • #9
                  To me it marks the difference between "I'm playing this song" and "I know and care about this song." That matters most for a singer who is supposed to be really feeling the song. I suck at memory-anything, so this is a bit of a drag and a big deal for me. On piano, though, people accept music sheets more readily than for, say, guitars or bass.
                  Hi Mom!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Depends on the band, depends on the material, depends on the gig. I don't use a music stand per se ... my notes are in a book of 5 x 8 that are two hole punched with 1 incch snap rings through 'em. 1 Card per song ... which I "shuffle" into set list order before each gig. The book of cards sits on atop of my RD700SX. I try to make a card for every tune - but don't necessarily include cards for tunes that I don't need 'em for in the "gig book". The approach is low key - and in many cases, I find that I may not look at the card for a given song at all. They're convienent for when I need a memory tickle to remember the first chord of a change on those tunes that may not have made the list for a couple of gigs (meaning it's been a month or two since they were last played!).
                    The SpaceNorman

                    www.facebook.com/SuperstarsOfRock
                    www.souldoutrocks.com

                    Keyboards and Tone Generators: Yamaha CP300, Kronos 88, Roland AX Synth, Motif ES Rack
                    Keyboard Rack: Samson SM10 Line Mixer, Motu MIDIExpressXT MIDI Interface, Shure PSM200 IEM system, M-Audio Wireless MIDI, Live Wires IEM ear buds, iPad wOnSong.
                    Stage Amplification: Stereo via 2 Yamaha DSR112s

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It depends on what the band is like. If you're playing a wedding or a corporate party, who cares, people just want to dance and drink. But can you imagine U2 playing with a music stand?

                      What about David Bowie? I saw him on "Live by Request" a few years ago. He had a music stand and a 3 ring notebook. The moderator asked him about it and he said he has all his song lyrics in there and used it onstage. It was mostly a security blanket for him. If he forgot something he'd have it right there.

                      I think some rock 'n rollers music stand phobia is out and out silly. Talk about worrying about something superficial. As long as you can play and rock, who cares? I don't.
                      P E A C E

                      "A band that is not appearing is disappearing" -- Art Blakey

                      "If you can't play the blues you might as well hang it up" -- Dexter Gordon

                      http://myspace.com/boomboomdrumsYamaha Stage Custom Drum Kit (Marina Green)
                      Ziljain, Paiste, Wuhan Cymbals
                      1972 Slingerland wood Snare Drum
                      KORG TR keyboard
                      Cubase LE
                      Tascam US-122 USB Interface
                      George Steck Baby Grand Piano

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree that it is different for keyboard players. I am a hired gun around town. This week, I am in 4 different bands with 120 different songs. i don't even try to memorize them, but I learn them, listen to them, and then keep a notebook with Cliff Notes. So far, nobody has bothered me. Of course, in 2 weeks, I have no gigs, feast or famine. But that will change. Can't worry about it.
                        8 pr boxers
                        3 pr jeans
                        7 tee shirts
                        2 pr shoes

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Depends on the gig. For jazz pickup gigs, it is expected. For your originals band, it is forbidden. That's just the way expectations are.
                          Moe---It puts the SINES in the basket, or else it gets the hose again.http://www.hotrodmotm.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not sure if this applies but I have seen very few rockers from the classic era (60s-90s) onstage who DID NOT have a teleprompter hidden into the stage or a box that looks like a floor monitor wedge. Hell, some even use that tablet-like sheet-music thingy (MusicPad?) right there on the floor (Chris Robinson of Black Crowes is one). I think one of the reasons that Mick Jagger sang that simple-lyric song (I need you, you, you) at the Grammys was because there were precious few places to hide a prompter on that stage. At a Stones gig he has prompters scattered all around the place built into the stage so that no matter where he runs to he can have a peek.
                            I don't have a problem with this per se - I would rather the performer use a crutch than blow the song - but proper concealment is key. A music stand looks out of place in any setting except Classical performance. Just my opinion, YMMV. Personally, I think a music stand looks totally bogus on a rock band stage. I use small 4x6 index cards laying down on top of my keyboard - held in place by a small sticky clip from Office depot. I keep them there for reference only and find that I rarely even look at them - the exception being when a girl flashes her boobs and I momentarily forget the next line, I can steal a quick glance at my notes to get back on track.
                            Currently employed: Korg Kronos/61, Korg CX-3 v2, Korg Radias w/kb, Roland Fantom-S/61, Roland D-550, Yamaha MU100r, Kawai K4r, a bunch o' guitars with a couple of amps, a few pedals, ASUS G74SX PC with 12 GB/7.5TB/Win7-64bit running Sonar X1 with a few NI soft-synths.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Big band jazz- a lot of those are reading gigs where the bandleader is calling what he wants out of a catalog, and a lot of times the players are not full time with the band, but frelancers. I see the need for stands there. Plus, the nice stands with the band logo on them look nice in that setting. Same with classical- probably only the soloists/featured performers have things memorized.

                              Singer in a cover band? No way. Learn the words. I saw a pic on FB with this guy who had a music stand right in front of him at center stage. The 1st comment was "lose the stand, separates the pros and the wanna bes" How can you be a front man with a stand in front of you, looking down at the words the whole time?

                              I also don't like it when keybaord players put a big giant stand in front of them, higher than their top keyboard so you can't see them at all.
                              My Live Gear: Roland FA-08, Hammond SK1-73, Moog LP
                              My Band: http://www.bksband.com

                              Comment



                              Working...
                              X