Harmony Central Forums
Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

iZotope Iris

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse







X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • iZotope Iris

    http://www.izotope.com/products/audio/iris/



    I am buying this and replacing Kontakt with it.
    https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

  • #2
    It's SOOOOOO good, that it has silenced any comments.
    https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

    Comment


    • #3
      Meh. It's a nice visual way to represent filtering, but that's basically all that's going on (with some LFOs and envelopes thrown in for good measure).
      <div class="signaturecontainer">Powered by soundware -- <a href="http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-soundware-by-posers-kitchen.html" target="_blank">http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-so...s-kitchen.html</a></div>

      Comment


      • #4
        Meh. It's a nice visual way to represent filtering, but that's basically all that's going on (with some LFOs and envelopes thrown in for good measure).


        I just don't think you get it. Different strokes for different folks.

        This is brilliant!
        https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

        Comment


        • #5
          I haven't had a chance to try the demo yet, but definitely plan on doing so. It is a very interesting concept, and from what others have said on KVR, it is very easy to use. The only problem I have with it so far is that I haven't heard anything anyone has done with it that sounds worth a damn. That and everything sounds so "reverby".
          <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://soundcloud.com/donchesson" target="_blank">http://soundcloud.com/donchesson</a></div>

          Comment


          • #6
            Maybe I didn't understand what was happening in the videos, but basically you take a brush of some sort and "paint" out the parts of the audio spectrum you want to have play back at any particular time. That, to me, is more or less a bandpass filter whose width and center frequency vary over time. You can stack various sounds you create this way, apply some filters and some envelopes, and so on. Oh and it automagically maps a sample for you across the keyboard, which is nice.

            If there's a lot more to it than that, I'm all ears. But if that's basically what it is then I'm still meh.
            <div class="signaturecontainer">Powered by soundware -- <a href="http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-soundware-by-posers-kitchen.html" target="_blank">http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-so...s-kitchen.html</a></div>

            Comment


            • #7
              wow

              Comment


              • #8
                I haven't had a chance to try the demo yet, but definitely plan on doing so. It is a very interesting concept, and from what others have said on KVR, it is very easy to use. The only problem I have with it so far is that I haven't heard anything anyone has done with it that sounds worth a damn. That and everything sounds so "reverby".


                Give it some time and think outside the box. I already showed what I've done with one JD-800 sample to one of my college professors and he was impressed.
                https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

                Comment


                • #9
                  Maybe I didn't understand what was happening in the videos, but basically you take a brush of some sort and "paint" out the parts of the audio spectrum you want to have play back at any particular time. That, to me, is more or less a bandpass filter whose width and center frequency vary over time. You can stack various sounds you create this way, apply some filters and some envelopes, and so on. Oh and it automagically maps a sample for you across the keyboard, which is nice.

                  If there's a lot more to it than that, I'm all ears. But if that's basically what it is then I'm still meh.


                  You can chose any area in any audio recording and manipulate the harmonics of its' sound. This manipulation has NO boundaries in size and shape as you can draw and/or map out the audio spectrum of a sound or recording to be manipulated. On top of that it successfully maps out a sound from one sample with damn good fidelity.

                  I can't seem to put this synth down and my grades are going to suffer because of it. I have way to many sample libraries to be idle with this synth and I can't wait to use this with a MiniBrute.

                  In my mind, this is bought already. I'm just physically waiting until Thursday to get through this week of school. I'm at college now playing with the demo.

                  It's extremely easy to use but it's all the better if you know what your looking at. I showed it to a few students but they don't know what's going on or what they're looking at.
                  https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Give it some time and think outside the box. I already showed what I've done with one JD-800 sample to one of my college professors and he was impressed.


                    Yeah, I'm eager to give it a go. I certainly can see the possibilities of some amazing creations, I think I just haven't been keen on what little I've heard from others so far. It is intriguing!
                    <div class="signaturecontainer"><a href="http://soundcloud.com/donchesson" target="_blank">http://soundcloud.com/donchesson</a></div>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Maybe I didn't understand what was happening in the videos, but basically you take a brush of some sort and "paint" out the parts of the audio spectrum you want to have play back at any particular time. That, to me, is more or less a bandpass filter whose width and center frequency vary over time.


                      Right, but it's hard to be that surgically precise with a conventional band-pass filter (especially with how the X axis of the display lets you essentially automate sweeps), and even then it takes a good amount of experience, as well as some old-fashioned trial and error. (Not to mention, a far better ear than mine.) Iris just appears to make the process more intuitive, allowing you to get your desired results on the first try.

                      I've always felt that spectral displays are great workflow enhancers when dealing with audio, and this program seems to take that concept and run with it. Sure, every feature they've demonstrated has been done elsewhere, but it looks like they've made some real strides in not just speeding things up, but also getting those functions to interact with each other in meaningful ways. It seems like it's not so much about doing things that haven't been done before, but rather allowing you to do them faster, without sacrificing control.

                      So I guess it largely depends on what people consider to be the criteria for a significant development.

                      Keys and Pads: Arturia Analog Laboratory 49, Arturia Spark, Korg Kronos 61, Korg nanoPad 2
                      Strings: Carvin Bolt HSS w/ Wilkinson vibrato
                      DAWs: FL Studio 10, Sonar X2 Producer
                      Plugs: Arturia V Collection 3, Crypton Vocaloid 2 Megurine Luka, Korg Legacy Collection, Madrona Labs Aalto, NI Guitar Rig 5, Toontrack Superior Drummer 2.0

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Don't get me wrong, there's definitely usefulness in the technique of applying multiple moving bandpass filters to a sound. I'm thinking right now, for instance, of some fun programs I could do for the PC3 that essentially implement this stuff, but with upgrades.

                        For instance -- what if your spectrum comes from an FM operator pair which itself can be set into motion in various ways. You apply the filtering/DSP to different spectral bands within the sound, and then the result gets fed into another FM operator (which can, of course, be modulated as well). Now multiply that by five or eight or some similar number -- that's the kind of thing I'm thinking of. Based on my recent experiences with formant filters and FM you could make some really crazy stuff that way. Now, if this plugin can do _that_ then we're talking. That's more on the level of the kind of things the PC3 can do (and lots, lots more).
                        <div class="signaturecontainer">Powered by soundware -- <a href="http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-soundware-by-posers-kitchen.html" target="_blank">http://pc3nerd.blogspot.com/p/nxt-so...s-kitchen.html</a></div>

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Got an email on this earlier this week, and it looks awesome. MusikB, if you say it's amazing, I'll snag it this weekend.

                          How good is it at finding fundamentals from seemingly atonal sources and mapping them across the keyboard? Are there many timestrech-engine-esque-sounding artifacts?

                          Cheers!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It looks interesting. It is not clear to me whether it offers anything new versus say Camel Audio Alchemy. It has a spectral resynthesizer and visual sonogram editor with different brushes, etc. and lets you cut, past, move, etc. portions of the sonogram as you would an manipulate an image. You can also import your own images, edit and play them like sonograms, and use the morphing tools to blend different sounds together. I will have to check Iris out tonight when I am at my DAW PC.

                            Tone2's Gladiator synthesizer is also a sonogram manipulating synthesizer, but it does not have analysis or data import. You can only work with harmonic content that ships with the synth (and that you buy as expansions) but there is plenty of stuff there to enable a very broad range of sonic possibilities (think of it like working with the wave tables in Largo, Blofeld, or Virus TI or something like that). Also there are a fixed set of mathematical operations on the sonogram that are built in. Tone2 doesn't state the synthesis method used in Gladiator in exactly the same way (they call it "Harmonic Content Mapping") but it is basically applying various mathematical operations to and changing the way you scan through sonograms. It actually sounds really good and is sort of a refreshing way to do things in my humble opinion.
                            <div class="signaturecontainer">Gribs<br />
                            <font size="3"><br />
                            <font size="1"><i>...Music can be used to stimulate mass emotion, while mathematics cannot; and musical incapacity is recognized (no doubt rightly) as mildly discreditable, whereas most people are so frightened of the name of mathematics that they are ready, quite unaffectedly, to exaggerate their own mathematical stupidity.<br />
                            </i><br />
                            G.H. Hardy in A Mathematician's Apology (London 1941).</font></font></div>

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Got an email on this earlier this week, and it looks awesome. MusikB, if you say it's amazing, I'll snag it this weekend.

                              How good is it at finding fundamentals from seemingly atonal sources and mapping them across the keyboard? Are there many timestrech-engine-esque-sounding artifacts?

                              Cheers!


                              I haven't really noticed a bunch of artifacts so far but keep in mind that my monitors are Yamaha HS 80M's. Not really known for outstanding clarity or detail, just good translation. I also haven't gotten my Apollo yet either.

                              You can use the zoom tool to really isolate content. The zoom works well while viewing the spectrum and/or the waveform.

                              I'm buying this after class today to really have at it for a few hours with its' full content.
                              https://soundcloud.com/jersey-bloke<br><br>DSI Mopho X4<br>Elektron Analog Four<br>Akai MPC 2500<br>StudioLive 16.0.2 Digital Mixer<br>Allen &amp; Heath Xone VF-1 Analog Stereo Filter<br>Studio One V2.5 Professional Edition<br>Ableton Live 9 Standard

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X