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Differences between these 2 keyboards?

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  • Differences between these 2 keyboards?

    I've never owned a keyboard before but I've played guitar for many years and would like to try something new. Money is tight but I can afford either of these. Obviously would like to save the $50 if the differences are small enough but can go for either. A local store has both of these but I can't spend enough time getting into all the subtitles of them in a store.

    I'd say that 95% of the time I'll just be using the grand piano sound so I'm not really concerned about most of the other features. However, because I don't really know anything at all about keyboards I thought there might be considerations I'm not aware of. The only thing I really care about other than that is the reverb options but if you guys have any thoughts one way or the other I'm all ears. Thanks!

    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/CTK4200/

    http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/CTK6000/

  • #2
    Get the black one.

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    • #3
      Just based on the fact that they're both CTK-XXXX part numbers, I'd guess they have the same grand piano sound, so your choice should be based on other factors, of which the -6000 has more. What kind of music do you want to make with it? With a keyboard of that type I don't think there are really options for modifying the sounds, so you have to be content with the sounds it gives you, and the -6000 has more, but not much more (670 vs. 600). The -6000 also appears to have effects, drum rhythms and an arpeggiator. Do you think you would have use for any of those?
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      • #4
        Probably not much use for that stuff...don't want any backing tracks or rhythms other than maybe a click track or something. I don't really know how to play anything on a keyboard right now but after the basics I'll want to play a few simple classical pieces, maybe some Ben Folds or Elton John. Those are the two piano players I listen to the most. Love Eno's ambient stuff too but probably won't get involved in that as it would take a lot more of an investment for me to get into all that.

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        • #5
          One will make you a multi-platinum artist and a billion dollars and the other won't.
          Yamaha MOX8 | E-Mu Emax (SE Upgrade) | Yamaha RX11 | Yamaha TG33 | Yamaha DX7 | Roland Alpha Juno | Roland D50 | Roland JV-2080 | Korg DDD-1 | Oberheim DMX (w/ Factory MIDI)
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          • #6
            ^
            Don't be an ass. This is a legitimate question.

            phishmarisol, go with the cheap one for now. If you're questioning a difference of $50, that means it's a significant difference for you, and since you apparently mostly want the grand piano, start with the cheap one. It has MIDI over USB, which means you can control software synthesizers if you want, many of which are free.
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            • #7
              ^
              Don't be an ass. This is a legitimate question.

              phishmarisol, go with the cheap one for now. If you're questioning a difference of $50, that means it's a significant difference for you, and since you apparently mostly want the grand piano, start with the cheap one. It has MIDI over USB, which means you can control software synthesizers if you want, many of which are free.


              I was going to say the exact opposite

              "If $50 are the difference, go for the more expensive because it will be basically the same thing, with a lot of things you may end finding useful for auto-accompanying your guitar chops"

              ... I mean, for $50 bucks you get some extra stuff that may be useful... being "may be" the keywords.
              www.guslozada.com

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              • #8
                Although I'd be inclined to go with the CTK-6000, your priorities might cause you to choose the CTK-4200.
                Maybe a comparison available from Casio will help:
                http://www.casio-intl.com/asia-mea/en/emi/compare/keyboard/

                Also, while Sweetwater is a decent place to buy, you might consider other deals, such as:
                http://www.musiciansfriend.com/keyboards-midi/casio-ctk-6000-61-key-portable-piano

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                • #9
                  Since you'll be playing mostly piano, I strongly recommend you save up a few more bucks and get a used CDP-100 or Privia for around $300-$400. That gives you 88 keys and (more importantly) fully weighted hammer action keys. That way, you actually get to learn to play piano, and if you find yourself in a room with a real piano, you'll be able to play it. If you learn on an unweighted or "semi-weighted" keybaord, you won't have developed the necessary muscles and techniques. Plus, it's much harder to play piano well on anything but a hammer-action keyboard.

                  Plus many of these come with a stand, even at those prices. (I'd be happy to find one cheaper, without the stand.)

                  Check Craigslist for "casio piano" and look for CDP-100 or PX-110 through PX-330. These all are portable and have built-in speakers. A lot of pros use these as a weighted controller or backup in case their more expensive digital piano fails. And they sound great, especially given the price.
                  learjeff.net

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                  • #10
                    ^
                    Don't be an ass. This is a legitimate question.


                    My apologies. I wasn't in...proper state of mind last night.
                    Yamaha MOX8 | E-Mu Emax (SE Upgrade) | Yamaha RX11 | Yamaha TG33 | Yamaha DX7 | Roland Alpha Juno | Roland D50 | Roland JV-2080 | Korg DDD-1 | Oberheim DMX (w/ Factory MIDI)
                    MacBook Pro (Core i7) | Zoom R-16 | Yamaha HSM-50s | Cubase 5 | Ableton Live Intro | Novation Launchpad

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                    • #11
                      My apologies. I wasn't in...proper state of mind last night.


                      I still got a chuckle out of it.
                      Studio: Alchemy - Yamaha Mox6 - Roland Gaia - Plugiator - GSI Burn - VB3
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                      • #12
                        Since you'll be playing mostly piano, I strongly recommend you save up a few more bucks and get a used CDP-100 or Privia for around $300-$400. That gives you 88 keys and (more importantly) fully weighted hammer action keys. That way, you actually get to learn to play piano, and if you find yourself in a room with a real piano, you'll be able to play it. If you learn on an unweighted or "semi-weighted" keybaord, you won't have developed the necessary muscles and techniques. Plus, it's much harder to play piano well on anything but a hammer-action keyboard.

                        Plus many of these come with a stand, even at those prices. (I'd be happy to find one cheaper, without the stand.)



                        Check Craigslist for "casio piano" and look for CDP-100 or PX-110 through PX-330. These all are portable and have built-in speakers. A lot of pros use these as a weighted controller or backup in case their more expensive digital piano fails. And they sound great, especially given the price.



                        Good points. I've only ever played on "synth action" and I have a hell of a time trying to play real pianos.
                        Studio: Alchemy - Yamaha Mox6 - Roland Gaia - Plugiator - GSI Burn - VB3
                        Live:
                        Samson Graphite controller - SM Pro V-Machine - Mackie SRM 450 v3

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                        • #13

                          While it's undoubtably true that learning to play on a keybed with proper action is important for good piano technique, phishmarisol said: "Money is tight but I can afford either of these. Obviously would like to save the $50 if the differences are small enough but can go for either." The $300-$400 dollar range is literally double the cost of the models being asked about. If the comment about the money situation was sincere, it seems a used CDP-100 or Privia are out of contention.

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