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  • #16
    I'm not a modular/weird sound guy in my noobiness, but I do appreciate the sounds and the talent it takes to create interesting textures. I'm sure it is in my future, so I always read these threads even if I don't have anything to ask

    Hopefully my post will be seen as an encouragement for modular and experimental conversations and not me yet again talking about something I know nothing about
    http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

    Comment


    • #17
      Brief comment on Serge stuff...like any of the modular systems, it has its 'fan boys'. There are also its detractors, to whom everything Serge is overpriced and overrated.

      I like using it because I really like the work flow. The size is just right, the build quality is very good, and I much, much prefer patching with banana jacks. Perhaps it's silly, but I really prefer them greatly to the eurorack patchable cables, and they are much cheaper also. I think that the perception of it being overpriced comes from 2 main areas (though others will disagree, of course) - one is that because you can't buy individual modules like you can with most other systems, once you have a panel or 2, it starts getting harder and harder to avoid redundancy. I have more than I need (8 panels) but there is nothing that I can see parting with, because there is always some module or 2 within a panel that I like to use. The other controversial price point is the power supplies. I don't know enough technically to really know the answer, but the serge power supplies are apparently off the shelf ones that can be gotten for much cheaper - but Rex claims that he does all of this calibration on them, and sells them for rather hefty prices. Some people say that this calibration stuff is nonsense.

      I am really interested in the less traditional stuff. I have a sizable Eurorack system going and am as much or more into the sound I make than something structured.

      I am told by local modular folks that one has to experience patching a Serge to really grok it.

      Have you guys seen the documentary What the Future Sounded Like from AU about EMS? I thought it was excellent. It contains much interview material of the original guys from EMS (Peter Zinovieff, Tristram Cary, David Cockerell). You can find it on YouTube. WARNING it is NOT SAFE FOR WORK. There is a discussion in the documentary about groups like Hawkwind imagining using early synthesizers to take people on trips without using drugs and video clips from their early live shows which contain nudity.

      I am also a very difficult person. I just happen to be pretty nice here. My wife is a saint, which is one of many reasons why I am totally devoted to her.

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      • #18
        I don't want to split hairs, but we BOTH know that's not why he was banned. As far as I can tell, making a constructive comment about how to improve this forum doesn't get you banned. Calling the entire forum a bunch of twats and then calling Purity Control a whore does (and should).

        And for the life of me, I can't see why this isn't obvious.

        I personally am very interested in talking about experimental music, nontraditional instruments, etc. It turns out I've spent a number of years doing it.

        But let's face it. Some people just don't play well with others. They don't even care enough about others' sensibilities to not call them 'twats.'

        It makes me think that some people turn to internet forums because they have some kind of social difficulty. Hell, it may also be why some people turn to music in the first place. There's certainly no shortage of social malcontents in the world.

        But I'm frankly tired of hearing the claim that (1) this forum is inhabited by dull people who don't want to talk about anything interesting, and (2) the moderators are free speech stifling Nazis. I've been here. I've seen. It's just not true.

        And I don't envy the moderators their job, either. It's like they've signed on to babysit problem children for free.


        Well, I've been through this whole argument and don't wish to open up this proverbial 'can of worms', but....
        logically, the fact that a mod's job may be thankless in many ways, and is done for free, doesn't imply that any decision that is made is right and fair. It just doesn't follow. I also had issues (as did others) with some heavy handed moderation back a few years ago. Others thought that it was just fine, but it is something that is open to debate, and, factually, some people left the forum because of it. I also think that one should differentiate among people who 'don't play well with others'. After a point, when you get rid of all of them, you get a homogenous, unlively forum, and I do think that this forum has kind of become that. I'm obviously not the only one who thinks that.

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm not a modular/weird sound guy in my noobiness, but I do appreciate the sounds and the talent it takes to create interesting textures. I'm sure it is in my future, so I always read these threads even if I don't have anything to ask

          Hopefully my post will be seen as an encouragement for modular and experimental conversations and not me yet again talking about something I know nothing about


          You've already got the correct facial expression, so all that's left is to spend the money.

          Comment


          • #20
            I suppose that's what's keeping me... I'd rather keep the family and the house for now...
            http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

            Comment


            • #21


              You don't need new stuff, you just have to think in ways you normally wouldn't.
              Give me my moog, but **** off you american techno rockstar! people in countries I've never been to do it better than you!

              Computer Music Guide

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              • #22
                I suppose that's what's keeping me... I'd rather keep the family and the house for now...


                Metro makes a good point.

                Your guitar and pedals are a modular synth rig. The guitar is your oscillator, and the pedals, hands, etc. supply the other essential components of a synth (amplifier, envelopes, filters, etc.). You could start experimenting there.

                Comment


                • #23
                  One thing that I think makes for truly novel experimental music is that it's not self-consciously experimental. In other words, it's not necessarily made with the guided intention of being not-this or not-that. It just springs from independent creativity, and does not attempt to fit in with genre expectations. It can be tonal, it can conform to western scaling, but that still doesn't mean it's trying to 'fit in'.

                  Daniel Johnson is an example that comes to mind. Some love him, some hate him, but there's something unique and experimental about his work, as far as where his music comes from.






                  This one confronts the whole issue of categorization by genre:





                  I just discovered that the full length film is posted here in Vimeo:






                  And two other videos I came across recently that I like for different reasons:



                  Some nice textures here:

                  Kronos, Fant.G8, PC3X, K2500RS, A6, Q, M3-61, Fant.X7, Motif 8, EX5(x2), V-Synth, K2000(x2), D50, JD800, JD990, JP8080, XP30, MC909, MC505, JX-10, JX-305, TR-707, Juno 1, DR-202, Radias, Triton Pro, Wavest. SR, EMX1, ESX1, ER-1, EA-1, R3, Poly 800, RS7000, FS1R (x2), RM1X, AN200, DX200, QY70, QY100, K5000S, OB-12, Maschine,ASR10,ASR88,ASR-X Pro, EPS,Virus B, Equinox,E-Mu XL-7,MiniAK, Synthstation,X-Station, XioSynth,TG33,Venom,V50,UltraNova,Z1,Spark,Moog LP Stage II, JP8000,Tetra,Supernova 2.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    If you have a sincere interest in experimental music on modular synth, "Silver Apples Of the Moon" by Morton Subotnick is required listening. I believe this is just an excerpt of the original 1967 version, which was done on a Buchla modular:
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EelvKqhu1M4&playnext=1&list=PL215CD985A0C5 5C90&feature=results_video

                    There are Youtube videos of Subotnick's modernized version, which he plays on a modern (hybrid analog-digital) Buchla modular and Ableton Live. He's scheduled to play at Moogfest 2012, so maybe he has some Moog gear in his rig tool.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I really get off messing with preset randomizers. Especially ones with some amount of controls. They're also a very useful tool for learning how to make unique sounds. Mash it up and then dissect it.

                      My favorite implementations are in Reaktor, Absynth 5, and the Virus TI. Although the Virus TI does it in a unique way, not so much with a true randomizer but with "parameter lock". You can freeze up any parameters you want in any patch, then surf through the presets where all those other parameters aren't locked. Almost more like selectively mutating a patch. Some interesting, and occasionally stunning results are to be had.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        What is a 'preset'?

                        I really get off messing with preset randomizers. Especially ones with some amount of controls. They're also a very useful tool for learning how to make unique sounds. Mash it up and then dissect it.

                        My favorite implementations are in Reaktor, Absynth 5, and the Virus TI. Although the Virus TI does it in a unique way, not so much with a true randomizer but with "parameter lock". You can freeze up any parameters you want in any patch, then surf through the presets where all those other parameters aren't locked. Almost more like selectively mutating a patch. Some interesting, and occasionally stunning results are to be had.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I tend to rebel against such 'requirements'. I've tried listening to Subotnick a number of times, but he just doesn't do it for me.

                          If you have a sincere interest in experimental music on modular synth, "Silver Apples Of the Moon" by Morton Subotnick is required listening. I believe this is just an excerpt of the original 1967 version, which was done on a Buchla modular:
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EelvKqhu1M4&playnext=1&list=PL215CD985A0C5 5C90&feature=results_video

                          There are Youtube videos of Subotnick's modernized version, which he plays on a modern (hybrid analog-digital) Buchla modular and Ableton Live. He's scheduled to play at Moogfest 2012, so maybe he has some Moog gear in his rig tool.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Liking is not required, only listening - and that was directed more at someone with less familiarity with "experimental" modular music, like CR. I figure you already knew about Subotnick and the other usual suspects.

                            What "experimental" modular music do you dig?

                            I tend to rebel against such 'requirements'. I've tried listening to Subotnick a number of times, but he just doesn't do it for me.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Is there anyone here interesting in less traditional gear?

                              Ciat lonbarde, blippoo, gotharman, even Serge, etc, in the context of non harmonic, 'experimental' music?

                              ....



                              Not me. Most of the gear you refer to, I haven't heard of before, and have to do a search just to know what it is.

                              I'm content to use more mainstream gear.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                One thing that I think makes for truly novel experimental music is that it's not self-consciously experimental. In other words, it's not necessarily made with the guided intention of being not-this or not-that. It just springs from independent creativity, and does not attempt to fit in with genre expectations.


                                The Shaggs "Philosophy of the World" comes to mind as well. A father of three girls decided to record an album just for fun and it somehow turned into a cult record.
                                Hard: JP-8000, MC-505, R3, microSTATION, Moog Theremin, miniKP, Ineko, Bitrman
                                Soft: Ableton Live 8, Korg Legacy Collection, FM8, D16 Classic Boxes/SilverLine Collection

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