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  • #16






    Quote Originally Posted by wesg
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    Word. A lot of my comping uses only one finger on the left hand, and it's usually within a 4th of middle C. And a lot of it uses no left hand at all.




    mine too. We have run an open jam for the last 4 years. Its always interesting when we have a sit in keyboard player and i get bumped and get to listen to our band as just a person in the crowd. The thing that I notice is that how many really great keyboard players tend to cut the band to death with a busy left hand or create mush by over playing. most tend to come from a solo piano act background and are not band guys. Its a different ball game when you play with a band that has a bass player , a rhythm player and a lead player.
    <div class="signaturecontainer">&quot;you mess with him and you mess with the whole trailer park&quot;</div><br>

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    • #17
      I played bass/second keyboards in a band for a year or so in the 80s. But it was all synth bass except for one song (U2's Two Hearts, which just needs a real bass). On almost every song I used a CV keyar to control an Odyssey. I only needed one other board, which was either a Poly-61 or a Juno-60.



      I hated it. Not so much the bass playing, but the others in the band. Especially the other keyboard player. He was a Five Star Ass, with his Korg CX-3, MemoryMoog, two MiniMoogs, a CP70 and a Korg VC-10.



      His chops were better than mine, too.



      But I still think keytar for key bass is the most comfortable and natural feeling. And sometimes you just have to jump up on the riser to kick the drummer back into the pocket.
      ComputerMusicGuide.com

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      • #18






        Quote Originally Posted by TIMKEYS
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        mine too. We have run an open jam for the last 4 years. Its always interesting when we have a sit in keyboard player and i get bumped and get to listen to our band as just a person in the crowd. The thing that I notice is that how many really great keyboard players tend to cut the band to death with a busy left hand or create mush by over playing. most tend to come from a solo piano act background and are not band guys. Its a different ball game when you play with a band that has a bass player , a rhythm player and a lead player.










        Quote Originally Posted by wesg
        View Post

        Word. A lot of my comping uses only one finger on the left hand, and it's usually within a 4th of middle C. And a lot of it uses no left hand at all.




        Well, I'd like to say it was the keyboard player, but he ain't that talented.



        I try to keep my left hand as minimal as possible when there's a bass player playing, especially since some of the other players have a tendency to overcomplicate the rhythm.

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        • #19
          Just get something cheap and run it through a bass amp. I once had to play keyboard bass because my buddy lost his bassist last-second, so I ran an old SY-22 through a crap bass amp and it ended up being remarkably believable.
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          • #20
            Look into a Korg MicroX. Good bass sounds and easy to move..
            <div class="signaturecontainer">If I listed all of my gear here my wife may see it and start asking questions. <img src="http://img3.harmony-central.com/acapella/ubb/facepalm.gif" border="0" alt="" title="facepalm" class="inlineimg" /></div>

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            • #21
              I try to keep my left hand as minimal as possible when there's a bass player playing, especially since some of the other players have a tendency to overcomplicate the rhythm.

              Good for you. Me too. I also EQ out a lot of the lows. However, I also really enjoy doubling the bass part on piano. I'm in a soul band, where that works for a lot of the tunes. But, only with cooperation from the bass player. Any tune where he doesn't stick to a very steady part, I don't do it, or where he doesn't want it (but he usually does). There are a few tunes where he wants it but tends to stray at different points, so I play a reduced part that reinforces him in the fundamentals but leaves space where he needs it. It's a lot of fun, frankly.

              I'd hate to be the bass for the band, though, on keys. Bass and drums are the most important instruments for most popular music, and have to be totally down and in the pocket, or there's no point in even showing up. Maybe when I grow up I'll be solid enough to do that and even have a few brain cells left over for my right hand. The parts I double on piano are all very simple ones, and a long way from all the things a bass player needs to cover in a whole lineup.

              Playing bass on a few tunes so the bass player could do something else, yeah, I'd do that. But not cover the whole gig!
              learjeff.net

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              • #22
                I'd look at a Korg Microstation and put it on an L position, or right above the S90 - which would be traded in for the smaller but same keybed S70XS since you won't need that extra low octave most of the time...



                The Microstation is only 399 dollars new right now and has minikeys but its keys are actually very playable. And it's very small and light, so easy to carry around. Not to mention it's a sequencer and has an arpeggiator, so you could sequence or arpeggiate your bass parts Also, USB connectivity so you can carry your computer around for writing and you don't need an extra interface.

                Here's a demo of the bass sounds.

                <div class="signaturecontainer"><font face="verdana"><a href="http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze" target="_blank">http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze</a></font></div>

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