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Any favorite B3 settings for Reggae?

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  • #31
    Does that mean he's somehow uncreative for wanting his musical life to follow a more traditional road?

    Good point but many musicians are not like that. Too bad for them.
    "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Outkaster


      Sometimes, and Reggae has done that fusing itself with hip hop but alot of older people do not like it and feel it ruins Reggae. I will not get into another flame war about this. It is not about pushing any boundries at all so what the **************** do you mean? It does not have **************** to do with what this thread is about. What do you care about what I do. Have you played semi-professionally, met international artists, backed-up national artists. It has nothing to do with being counter-productive. You like what you like and I will do and play as I please.


      well, maybe my post was besides the point of this thread.
      i think the "white folks can't play reggae, cause they're not living the lifestyle" triggered a bad vibe in me or something.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Puta


        well, maybe my post was besides the point of this thread.
        i think the "white folks can't play reggae, cause they're not living the lifestyle" triggered a bad vibe in me or something.


        It is the point that too often people get the music wrong. It does not have to even be white it can be black people. Like I said it has to do with execution and a lot of bands get it wrong. My point is the more you know about the culture and music the better off you are.
        "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Outkaster


          It is the point that too often people get the music wrong. It does not have to even be white it can be black people. Like I said it has to do with execution and a lot of bands get it wrong. My point is the more you know about the culture and music the better off you are.


          fair enough.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Outkaster
            it's not. i'm not a hippie, but i am white. my reggae doesn't suck. therefore, there is some white reggae which is neither bad nor made by hippies

            Well sorry to tell you but know a strictly Caribbean crowd, especially Jamaican, will give not props to a band that does not play the music right. Try it and see a bunch of blank faces staring at you like what the hell are you doing. I have experienced it seen it more than once, and heard others talk about it in the audience. If a band sound's traditional or play's right that is one thing but I will tell you what most of the time it is not that way. Playing Reggae is not just like playing blues or something. You have to immerse yourself in the culture. It is about the food, politics, music, the people and everything else. It is not just about trying to learn to play from a couple Marley records and smoking some weed. I listend to your sound clip and it was not even close. You can call it Reggae but it is not. I am not trying to be mean but I have been involved with the music for a lot of years.

            Sorry race plays a part but it is how things are sometimes. I was talking to some of the guy's in the band about this. This is cultural music and is heavily immersed in Jamaican history and the struggles of black people. Reggae that is popular now is Cappleton, Beenie Man, Sizzla, Lady Saw, Vegas, Luciano, and a host of others. True it is not politcal-social lyrics now but it is the music now of their streets. You hear it alot in the Bronx and parts of NYC.

            The old stand-by's like Judy Mowatt, Sugar Minot, Everton Blender, The Mighty-Diamonds, Burning Spear, Beres Hammond, Marcia Griffiths, Steel Pulse, Inner Circle and Third World will always have their place. I'm sorry to rant but this is something I know about. I listen to it, play it, practice it and most of all live it. You can play what you want but people should not give advice unless they know what they are talking about. I am not saying it is the case here but there is a lot of bad advice on this forum already.


            Listen to whey de man a seh. De man is informed and know what he is talking about. In fact de is de best commentary I have read in a very long time from someone who is not a journalist doing a study on Jamaican music.

            A very important point Outkaster made was that drum and bass was the foundation of reggae music. You can't play it right, that ie the sound without these.

            I am not trying to get on a wagon here, but I too have heard music that is passed off as reggae which is not. The correct elements are just not there.

            If you really want to know reggae and notice I said know and not play you have to visit and spend time in Reggaeland.

            I must say this that while Shaggy is labelled as a reggae artiste, and nuff respect to my kinsman. Shaggy's music is not reggae and he himself with tell you that.

            Anyway Outkaster if I didn't know better I would say you must have lived in Jamaica a good part of your life or maybe you are a Jamaican and don't even know it.

            I find you commentary very interesting and pretty good to the hitting the nailhead.

            I'll read the rest below as I posted just after reading the above article.


            .........born Jamaican

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Outkaster
              ... Reggae has done that fusing itself with hip hop but alot of older people do not like it and feel it ruins Reggae.


              how can reggae fuse itself with hip hop when hip hop came from reggae?

              wouldn't that just be bringin' it on home for hip hop?

              i guess if the reggae musicians bringing "hip hop elements" (which originally came from jamaica) into reggae don't understand the relationship between the two, or if hip hoppers think they're doing something new by ganking reggae beats instead of understanding _their_own_ culture then it would of course be very bad and unethical fusion music.


              which leads to another point: reggae is not the only black music sub-genre invoked by people who do not understand it. most modern rap musicians know very little if anything at all about black music before the Chronic ... if even that far.

              i record a bunch of ghetto ass bling hoppers and their complete lack of soul and historical awareness make me sick. they have no idea that rap originated in jamaica (which itself was completely left out of MTV's history of hip hop from a couple months ago ... shame on them), they don't know who Grandmaster Flash is, they think Run DMC is an instruction of some kind, they don't know who Isaac Hayes or Otis Redding are ... **************** ... they think Shaft is a movie starring Samuel Jackson!

              they also owe me money at this point. i could use a couple of rude boys right about now ...
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              • #37
                The big sound systems came from Jamaica like Stone Love for one. Most people do not know that and hip hop started there. Most of the West Indians settled into Brooklyn and Bronx. That is where the influence came from. You should see the parades there, Guyense, Jamaican, St Croix, Saint Kitt's, Saint Vioncent, Barbados, Trinidad, Haiti and all of the other Carribean countries are represented. All the huge floats have these huge sound systems. It is really crowded and pretty cool. The other festival is Caribanna in Toronto, CA.
                "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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                • #38
                  West Indies you say? I'm going to be in Antigua in the near future. Any good music I should check out?

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Cogan
                    West Indies you say? I'm going to be in Antigua in the near future. Any good music I should check out?


                    Yeah it is a smaller Isalnd. Mostly you will find Calypso and Soca there. Jamaica is native to Reggae and really it is the most popular there. The other Islands really like the other styles I mentioned above especially Trinidad, Domenica, Tobago and the Virgin Islands.
                    "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I remember this thread now. If you want to PM me skier4467 I can help you more.
                      "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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                      • #41
                        I was happy to stumble on this thread. There is so little out there regarding real reggae on the web.

                        I don't think that outkaster is really saying that you have to be black to play reggae....its just that you have to be in the culture and have to play it right. People think that Reggae music is easy; guitar players especially. I've yet to see a hippy/jam band guitar player come close to playing reggae guitar the right way. That doesn't mean that what they play isn't any good.

                        I was (very briefly) in (trying out really) a Reggae band (I didn't make it) that was full of white dudes. I was the rhythm guitar player (not for very long), and I tried to sing (couldn't do it). These guys played hardcore reggae noise. Most of them had played in traditional reggae bands down south, and grew up steeped in the music.

                        The keyboard player tired to show how to play the bubble a few times....I couldn't get it...physically.

                        The problem with this band is that they couldn't find a singer. Its one thing to have a white dude playing bass, but its really hard to be a good reggae singer if you ain't got it in ya!

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                        • #42
                          The best way to get it right is to listen to the masters with your organ at hand, it's easy to get the B3 settings right when doing this and sometimes it sounds off when playing alone but when mixed with the band it works.


                          Try some Winston Wright, he's on a lot of skinhead stuff that was all about organ, obviously Jackie Mittoo, Boris Gardiner with the Upsetters, I would avoid the later Marley stuff personally, they kind of used boring organ tones then. Just get a Trojan box set and spend the night grooving, you'll have good reggae B3 settings down.
                          My rig pictures

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Bozak
                            The best way to get it right is to listen to the masters with your organ at hand, it's easy to get the B3 settings right when doing this and sometimes it sounds off when playing alone but when mixed with the band it works.


                            Try some Winston Wright, he's on a lot of skinhead stuff that was all about organ, obviously Jackie Mittoo, Boris Gardiner with the Upsetters, I would avoid the later Marley stuff personally, they kind of used boring organ tones then. Just get a Trojan box set and spend the night grooving, you'll have good reggae B3 settings down.


                            I remember this thread. The later Marley stuff is fine. Not all Hammonds are the same. Some of the Hammond's were CV's, B2's etc. Mic placement on the Leslie is also very important. Some bubble tones are different. If you listen to the Bubble on Jimmy Cliff's "Special" it is different than "Crazy Baldheads" or any of the Steel Pulse stuff like "Chant a Psalm" More than the sound it is the technique. Most people get the technique wrong. Trojan boxed sets are ok but not the end all sound.
                            "Danny, ci manchi a tutti. La E-Street Band non e' la stessa senza di te. Riposa in pace, fratello"

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                            • #44
                              Of course not, just my preference to the early B3 sounds from Trojan, Studio One, Beverley's, etc. to the newer stuff which seems to lack that haunting organ sound.



                              Also be sure to check out the Easy Star All-Stars new release Radiodread, a friend of mine plays with them and it's really good!

                              http://www.easystar.com/
                              My rig pictures

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                              • #45
                                Man, I don't know **************** about reggae (and never said otherwise) and this thread has made me want to chill with some Jamaican dudes on a tropical island for a year and jam with them every day and learn this ****************.


                                Anybody got any hookups?
                                "You can practice for years and get really good at music and nobody cares because they cant eat it or **************** it.
                                Now if you made really good cheeseburger or had nice tits that would draw some attention." -pilk

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