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  • New Casio Privia Pianos

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/casio-strikes-chord-summer-namm-140000963.html

    Casio Strikes A Chord At Summer NAMM With The Introduction Of Four Privia Digital Pianos

    Privia Features New AiR Sound Engine


    Press Release: Casio America, Inc.



    DOVER, N.J., July 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Casio today announced the introduction of four new keyboards to its popular Privia digital piano line. Representing a significant step in the continuing evolution of the Privia line, the PX-150, PX-350, PX-750 and PX-850 offer an enhanced keyboard and a new powerful sound engine that provides a superior grand piano experience with exquisite detail in the lightweight and stylish design that Privia is known for. The latest Privia digital pianos will be exhibited in Casio's booth #400 during Summer NAMM at the Nashville Convention Center, July 12-14, 2012.
    "We are proud to launch the next generation of Privia digital pianos, which appeal to musicians for their portability, yet authentic piano type feel. This allows musicians to be highly productive when not in a studio," said Stephen Schmidt, Vice President of Casio's Electronic Musical Instruments Division. "The new Privia digital pianos deliver exceptional sound quality and are equipped with an abundance of new features, offering an enhanced performance."


    All four new models feature a redesigned 88-note Tri-sensor Scaled Hammer Action Keyboard. The simulated ebony and ivory textured keys on these digital pianos reproduce the touch feeling of an acoustic piano while the scaled weighted action keyboard provides the depth and integrity of an acoustic piano. Simultaneously, the tri-sensors capture a performance with more accuracy and speed than most traditional keyboards, resulting in an authentic piano touch that captures every detail and nuance. This is all intended to provide a natural sensatory feel for the musician while delivering the sounds and benefits of a digital piano.


    Casio's new proprietary sound source, "AiR" (Acoustic and intelligent Resonator), delivers unmatched realism and detail. Utilizing over three times the waveform memory of the previous generation, the AiR engine provides sensational dynamics, damper resonance and even compensates for the speed at which hammers strike strings at different velocities and key ranges.


    The new expanded Privia line not only has four different models which are available in a variety of colors and finishes but some models have expanded capabilities of the AiR sound source with up to 256 notes of polyphony, sympathetic resonance and cabinet simulation. The PX-350 and PX-850 also provide the ability to record a 44.1kHz .wav file directly to a USB thumb drive so that rehearsals, performances and moments of inspiration can be easily captured and shared.


    Casio's new Privia models will be available at music dealers in either black or white. The PX-150 can be purchased for an MSRP of $899.99, the PX-350 for an MSRP of $1,099.99 , the PX-750 for an MSRP of $1,099.99 and the black PX-850 for an MSRP of $1,499.99. For additional information regarding Casio's Privia line of digital pianos, please visit www.casiomusicgear.com.


    About Casio America, Inc.
    Casio America, Inc., Dover, N.J., is the U.S. subsidiary of Casio Computer Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, one of the world's leading manufacturers of consumer electronics and business equipment solutions. Established in 1957, Casio America, Inc. markets calculators, keyboards, digital cameras, mobile presentation devices, disc title and label printers, watches, cash registers and other consumer electronic products. Casio has strived to fulfill its corporate creed of "creativity and contribution" through the introduction of innovative and imaginative products. For more information, visit www.casiousa.com.

  • #2
    I'm sure this is dumb of me, but when I see "Casio", the first thing that pops to mind is pocket calculators and cheap GM keyboards. So when they announce higher-end stuff, I always get that "hmmm O RLY" feeling.

    But that's just me. Maybe if Casio were to send me a demo unit, I might change my mind.
    Hurrr. Derp, derp, derp.

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    • #3
      I'm sure this is dumb of me, but when I see "Casio", the first thing that pops to mind is pocket calculators and cheap GM keyboards. So when they announce higher-end stuff, I always get that "hmmm O RLY" feeling.

      But that's just me. Maybe if Casio were to send me a demo unit, I might change my mind.


      The Casio Privia series will probably be most appreciated by those who have formal piano training. So, if playing traditional piano is not your thing, then don't worry about it.

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      • #4
        I've played the PX-330 in a store a couple of times (at least) and it's no toy. It seriously sounds good. So I expect the 350 to be even better. Though I have a slight feeling that it might just be a PX-3 with speakers, from looking at the specs. We shall see.
        http://www.reverbnation.com/christianschulze

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        • #5
          I've played the PX-330 in a store a couple of times (at least) and it's no toy. It seriously sounds good. So I expect the 350 to be even better. Though I have a slight feeling that it might just be a PX-3 with speakers, from looking at the specs. We shall see.

          Compared to the 330 and the PX3, the 350 is supposed to have a new action and a new piano sound. The only PX3 feature that appears to have made it to the 350 is the finish of the keys. The PX3 seems to still be the only one with all the programming/MIDI control functionality.

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          • #6
            USB MIDI
            Casio continues the tradition or providing "class compliant" USB connectivity on Privia digital pianos. This allows Privia to be used with Mac or Windows computers without the need for downloading drivers. Class Compliant USB MIDI also allows Privia digital pianos can also be used as a controller the Apple iPad simply with the use of Apple's Camera Connection Kit.


            In other words, no MIDI in. No MIDI out - only the same stupid USB it had before.
            And if you have a MIDI-based rig, this is not for you.

            I keep waiting for a Casio Privia that I could actually use in my setup.
            'He's figworthy.'


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            • #7
              I have a PX-320, which I use when I want to actually practice playing the piano, as opposed to fooling around with synth knobs and things. My only complaint about it is the reverb has a distorted tail that is irritating when I practice with headphones. That said, it was the best sounding piano in its price range at the time I bought it, and the light weight was a nice bonus. Because of my policy of keeping the piano separate from my synth gear (synth stuff distracts me from serious piano practice), I've never used the MIDI connectors on my Privia.

              I'd be up for checking out these new models.

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              • #8
                In other words, no MIDI in. No MIDI out - only the same stupid USB it had before.
                And if you have a MIDI-based rig, this is not for you.

                I keep waiting for a Casio Privia that I could actually use in my setup.

                Only the bottom models are USB only. The PX-130 and replacement PX-150 don't have standard MIDI ports, but the PX-330, PX-3, and new PX-350 do. So, no need to wait!

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                • #9
                  The Casio Privia series will probably be most appreciated by those who have formal piano training. So, if playing traditional piano is not your thing, then don't worry about it.
                  Why do you say? I think they're great, and I play blues & soul. The only one I played in a band setting was CDP-100 (pretty much the oldest in the series), but I've played the others in stores.

                  It's a digital piano. It's for people who want to play piano. It has built-in speakers, which is handy for practice and home use, though the speakers aren't particularly good. It's barely over 20 lbs, so very easy to haul. It's short enough to fit in my rigid foam case, which was designed for a 76-key keyboard, bringing the total weight to just over 35 lbs. And it's inexpensive! (At least, if you stick to the lower levels. The higher levels add useless sounds and little else, IHMO, with the exception of the PX-3 which has decent stage MIDI master controller features.)

                  My only gripe is the numbering system. It makes it difficult to remember what the heck each unit is and where it sits compared to the other ones. They started out with a stupid system, then adopted a good one for the 110/120/130 through 310/320/330 years, but now they're back to stupid. Ah well! Hopefully there's a website somewhere with a good summary table.
                  learjeff.net

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                  • #10
                    Much of the newer Casio stuff is very nice. But I have to wonder from the marketing side of things why they didn

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                    • #11
                      I'm sure this is dumb of me, but when I see "Casio", the first thing that pops to mind is pocket calculators and cheap GM keyboards. So when they announce higher-end stuff, I always get that "hmmm O RLY" feeling.


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                      • #12

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                        • #13
                          Electric Puppy,

                          You need to take your head out of the sand. The Casio Privias have been good digital pianos for years. When they first came out people had your reaction, but that was like 5 or 6 years ago. Now everyone knows their quality and they have a good reputation. A few years back, I chose one over a Yamaha for gigging in a jazz trio. I didn't expect to like the Casio but was at the store testing out the Yamahas and a Casio was next to it so I checked it out and it sounded better than the Yamaha, was lighter, and was less expensive so I bought the Privia.

                          The Privia line is solid and comparable to the Yamahas, Korgs, and Rolands in the $1000 to $1200 price range. The more expensive Yamaha CP series and Kawai digital pianos are better but do cost a whole lot more. If your budget is $1000 for a digital piano, you should definitely check out the Casios their action is great and they sound really good.

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                          • #14
                            Hmpf.

                            I you haven't tried putting your head in the sand, then you ought to some time. It's cozy. And if the sun's been shining on it for a while, then it's toasty, too. Getting the sand out of your nose later though is kind of a awkward procedure.

                            Probably I should have been clearer in my first post: I don't really doubt that Casio can put out a worthy product. My point was just that they're not the first company I think of when it comes to mid-to-high range keyboards. Because, you know. Pocket calculators.
                            Hurrr. Derp, derp, derp.

                            Comment


                            • workstation M.I
                              workstation M.I commented
                              Editing a comment

                              ElectricPuppy wrote:
                              Hmpf. I you haven't tried putting your head in the sand, then you ought to some time. It's cozy. And if the sun's been shining on it for a while, then it's toasty, too. Getting the sand out of your nose later though is kind of a awkward procedure. Probably I should have been clearer in my first post: I don't really doubt that Casio can put out a worthy product. My point was just that they're not the first company I think of when it comes to mid-to-high range keyboards. Because, you know. Pocket calculators.

                              Try doing THIS on a "pocket calculator":

                              https://soundcloud.com/skyy38/px5s-guitar-bass-organ-and


                               


                          • #15
                            Because, you know. Pocket calculators.


                            In other words, you're old. Not as old as Meatball and Moe, who are old enough to have used slide rules, but still.. old...

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