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Who is offering the best user friendly keyboard/workstation these days.

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  • Who is offering the best user friendly keyboard/workstation these days.

    I'm curious, as far as sequencing, tweaking, etc. goes. What company is making the most user friendly board now-a-days? Thanks.

  • #2
    I think it's probably the Roland FA-06/FA-08.

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    • #3
      Thanks!

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      • #4
        +1 for Roland as well. I have owned 2 Roland boards (one which I use), one synth and one electric piano, both are extremely straight foward and self explanatory. TBH no other manufacturer makes user friendly boards these days cept for Roland (at least for a beginner). One thing with the FA-06 is that it is much like my VR-09 in build quality. CHEAPO!! and I was quite disappointed by Roland's sound set.
        Essex Upright Piano, VR-09, 84' Mexican Strat, Soprano Ukulele, Sterling Sub 4 Bass.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Chummy View Post
          +1 for Roland as well. I have owned 2 Roland boards (one which I use), one synth and one electric piano, both are extremely straight foward and self explanatory. TBH no other manufacturer makes user friendly boards these days cept for Roland (at least for a beginner). One thing with the FA-06 is that it is much like my VR-09 in build quality. CHEAPO!! and I was quite disappointed by Roland's sound set.
          Cheap as in a knob falls off the first time you turn it? It will not be for live purposes so I won't be lugging it around. It will just set on a stand for the purpose of creating demos.

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          • #6
            Roland stuff IMO is easier to use and learn than either Korg or Yamaha. Yamaha is the least-user friendly in my experience. Korg is in the middle.
            Last edited by Etienne Rambert; 07-12-2014, 08:37 PM.
            Youtube , ​Murika , France

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            • #7
              I bought a Jupiter 80 when it came out and got rid of it because learning how to perform open heart surgery would have been easier.

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              • #8
                I own both an FA-08 and a MOX8. The FA-08 wins hands down for user friendliness. I had to buy a video from motifator.com to learn to use my MOX. The video cost $34 but was extremely helpful.

                The FA-08 in the first 2 hours I created several studio sets from scratch and recorded a song using the sequencer. I didn't refer much to the book. All I did was watch a couple of demos from Ed Diaz on youtube.
                Last edited by kbeaumont; 07-22-2014, 10:45 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Crazyfoo View Post
                  I bought a Jupiter 80 when it came out and got rid of it because learning how to perform open heart surgery would have been easier.

                  What's to learn? You have a table. You have a patient. You make an incision. Then you open up the heart. What's the big deal? If the patient dies, that's part of the risk with open heart surgery. But on the plus side,a lot of operating rooms have Ultra-Lounge music piped in. So you don't need to hassle with a synth.

                  Ditto for the Roland.There are black keys. There are white keys. There is a big screen. There are some colored tabs. It looks like a snap.So I think you're exaggerating. Learning open heart surgery is probably a little more difficult than operating a Jupiter 80.
                  Last edited by Etienne Rambert; 07-22-2014, 09:11 PM.
                  Youtube , ​Murika , France

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Crazyfoo View Post
                    I bought a Jupiter 80 when it came out and got rid of it because learning how to perform open heart surgery would have been easier.
                    Hopefully you understood that the Jupiter-80 is not a workstation. You just dial up sounds and play them.
                    -------------------------------
                    Michael
                    Jupiter-50, MOX6, TI Polar, Moog LP, Korg Micro X, JV-1080
                    27" iMac, DP 7.24, Omnisphere, Alchemy, many more...
                    http://www.youtube.com/keybdwizrd

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gpaaib View Post

                      Cheap as in a knob falls off the first time you turn it? It will not be for live purposes so I won't be lugging it around. It will just set on a stand for the purpose of creating demos.
                      It's not really a cheap build quality- it's very lightweight and it's a lot of plastic, but it's built well. The knobs are solid, the buttons feel good. The only problem I found with my FA08 is because it's so light, it'd slide on my stand. I solved that by using some adhesive backed rubber strips on the stand.

                      It's very easy to use. I have a Yamaha S70XS, which I can get around on pretty good from years of Yamaha interface use, the FA was so easy I had nearly 60 studio sets created for 2 bands in just a couple days of working 2-3 hours a night. I disagree with Chummy on the sound set, it's got some fantastic sounds and a lot of editing depth to tweak things to your liking. It does lack in the brass dept, and the rompler organs are not at good as a clone, but I've found everything else to sound real nice, especially in a mix.
                      My Live Gear: Roland FA-08, Hammond SK1-73, Moog LP
                      My Band: http://www.bksband.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dan88z View Post

                        It's not really a cheap build quality- it's very lightweight and it's a lot of plastic, but it's built well. The knobs are solid, the buttons feel good. The only problem I found with my FA08 is because it's so light, it'd slide on my stand. I solved that by using some adhesive backed rubber strips on the stand.

                        It's very easy to use. I have a Yamaha S70XS, which I can get around on pretty good from years of Yamaha interface use, the FA was so easy I had nearly 60 studio sets created for 2 bands in just a couple days of working 2-3 hours a night. I disagree with Chummy on the sound set, it's got some fantastic sounds and a lot of editing depth to tweak things to your liking. It does lack in the brass dept, and the rompler organs are not at good as a clone, but I've found everything else to sound real nice, especially in a mix.
                        How are the guitar sounds? Are they as good or better than the Fantom G series?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I don't know, I never used a Fantom. They are not as good as the Yamaha guitars though, especially the electrics. A couple of the acoustic supernatural tones are nice though.
                          My Live Gear: Roland FA-08, Hammond SK1-73, Moog LP
                          My Band: http://www.bksband.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kbeaumont View Post
                            I own both an FA-08 and a MOX8. The FA-08 wins hands down for user friendliness. I had to buy a video from motifator.com to learn to use my MOX. The video cost $34 but was extremely helpful.

                            The FA-08 in the first 2 hours I created several studio sets from scratch and recorded a song using the sequencer. I didn't refer much to the book. All I did was watch a couple of demos from Ed Diaz on youtube.

                            That FA08 looks like a nice piece of gear. GAS alert.
                            Youtube , ​Murika , France

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My Motif ES6 took some time to learn but once you do, it's awesome......it can do anything and loop remix sets it miles ahead......loop remix lets you take any song, pattern or arpeggio and scramble it in a ton of different ways to give you all new material to use......you always have the option to keep the original before loop remixing if you don't like the results......there are two PDF books: Commanding The Yamaha Motif - Volumes 1 & 2 that were the best to master using the Motif.....

                              Also, the drum sets and drum patterns inside the Motif are off the hook.......an amazing collection that sound super real....

                              The main thing to understand is when you go into different modes (Pattern, Song, Voice, Performance) the menus change to better serve the mode you are in.....

                              I don't like the build quality of the budget Motifs, but you can buy a used Motif ES6 for $1000 or less on Ebay and it's definitely an awesome board and built like a tank.....I haven't really felt a need to upgrade to the newer models....it can hold up to 1 GB of DIMM memory to load samples or to sample with.....load and save times are slow but the Motif XS fixed this and the Motif XS holds 2 GB of DIMM memory....the Motif XS6 is pretty cheap used.....I wouldn't buy the original Motif from before the ES.....no USB storage

                              If you got a Motif and set time aside to learn it, it makes sense once you do......it's worth the investment of time.....lots of real time control....I would avoid the Motif racks unless you just want sounds.....the keyboard versions are fully functional workhorses....

                              If I lost all my gear, I would buy a Motif XS7 without a doubt or any hesitation and I know what's out there......I'd be back in business immediately.....you can buy sound libraries for it but with 2,670 sampled sounds inside and over 1000 presets and 128 note polyphony, you really have what you need built in....

                              Some rompler's sounds sound very thin and compressed but not the Motifs....the quality of the samples is better than the others and I can hear this as plain as day.....the effects are top notch as well.....

                              This is a video of a budget Motif so the XS has the same samples but better converters / better sound.....this demos all the sounds:

                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yvhmNmckgg

                              http://usa.yamaha.com/products/music..._xs/motif_xs7/

                              I have listened to sooooo many boards but the Motif XS's sound set seems way more complete than the others......also the built in acoustic pianos are so well done you don't need to look elsewhere for these......I love the electric pianos in it too (much more than any other board I have played)....

                              I have Roland synths too, and there are those sounds that Roland does really well, but as a "do it all" board, I will always go with a Motif.....it covers the bases so much more completely.....

                              Learning the Motif takes some time, but as a performance board, there's not much to learn.....selecting and storing sounds is super easy and the real time controllers are a no brainer as well......you can reach up and move sliders to adjust part volumes within a voice or performance and then store the voice and it's always that way.....if a sound has an arpeggio attached and you don't want it, reach up and press the arpeggio button to turn it off and store it to a user location and it won't be on anymore.....also, turn off the effects and listen to the samples.....they are still awesome.....many boards fall flat when you do this.....

                              When you move sliders to adjust mixer or voice part volumes, the sliders begin to make changes once you reach the point where the mixer is set so the volume won't drastically jump to the new setting.....this is how all digital mixers work....

                              When I figure out this as far as how good of a value it is, I figure in how much they cost used......there are synths with more sounds and synths with more gigs of samples, but not for the price of one of these....today I saw a Motif XS6 on Ebay for $1200 with free shipping.....pretty good deal....it was 100% working with no issues......usually with patience, you can find a Motif XS7 for about $1500....sometimes they are more.....
                              Last edited by RockPianoman; 08-09-2014, 01:05 PM.

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