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  • #46
    One of the reasons I really like having two filters in series is to use Filter 1 for “effects” (e.g., driving it with a tempo-synched sawtooth wave to create “dugga-dugga-dugga” synth lines, a la Donna Summer’s “I Feel Love”), then tie Filter 2 to mod wheel so I can also sweep the overall filter sound.

    But one of the weirdest uses I came up with was a sort of “pseudo-scratching” effect. Click on the attachment to download an MP3 example of the “scratching” effect. I did this by setting both filters to 4-pole lowpass with resonance about halfway up, then tying them to the mod wheel. However, they sweep oppositely so that as one sweeps from lowest to highest frequency, the other sweeps from highest to lowest. I used a sawtooth wave so you could hear how the pitched sound was being affected, but it sounds pretty cool with white noise, too.

    And this is also a good time to remind you that one of the big deals about Rapture is being able to modulate all this stuff, and tie it to controllers!
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

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    • #47
      We've touched on this a bit, but it's time for some details. You can load individual samples that stretch across the entire keyboard, or .SFZ files of multisamples.

      Click on the attachment to see the Oscillator page that we'll be talking about.

      We'll cover parameters starting the left corner, then work our way down and across.

      * Lo/Hi Key - When you're using multiple elements, you can restrict an element to play only over a certain key range.
      * Lo/Hi Vel - When you're using multiple elements, you can restrict an element to play only over a certain velocity range.
      * Bend Down/Up - Sets the pitch bend range.
      * Sustain/Sostenuto - Turn either or both on or off
      * Transpose - Transposes the oscillator up or down up to 96 semitones.
      * Tune - Tunes the oscillator in cents.
      * Keytrack - Adjusts whether the oscillator tracks the keyboard pitch. If you want to play a mean trick on someone, set it to -100: The keyboard plays backwards.
      * Phase - Alters the oscillator phase. As with the Lo/Hi options, this is relevant only if multiple elements are playing back.

      Those are the "normal" parameters, now it starts to get more interesting.

      * Quality - When set to Hi, you can do wide range pitch sweeps without aliasing.
      * Multi - This has four options, 3, 5, 7, or 9 voices and basically turns the waveform into the specified number of voices, spread evenly across the stereo field, and detuned according to the Detune parameter. However, this doesn't work when using multisamples, only with single stretched samples.
      * Ring Mod - This is mutually exclusive with Multi; you can have one or the other, but not both. Again, this works only with single samples. It works by creating two oscillators out of one, and ring modulating them with detuning based on the Detune parameter. Slight amounts of detuning give a "chorusing with attitude" type of sound. If you need more detuning, you can add more by selecting Detune in the Matrix Modulation section. There's one other interesting ring modulation option: If you right-click on an Element, you can select a Ring Modulate Previous Elements option. This causes the Element to ring-modulate the output of all previous Elements, which makes some really messy sounds.
      * Detune sets the Multi and Ring Mod detuning, up to plus or minus 100 cents.
      * Porta Time - Sets the glide time from one note to another, but this works in conjunction with the Polyphony control (up next).
      * Polyphony - Limits the polyphony for a given layer. When set to 1, the layer is essentially in mono mode; when set to 0, it's in mono mode and portamento is active.
      * Layers - This is a read-only that shows how many layers are in being used in the program.

      So what does all this mean? Basically, that's it's easy to get really fat, thick sounds even before you hit the DSP section. And also, that you can pitch/velocity limit each Element to create multisampled layers.
      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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      • #48
        man that long writing...
        Originality is the art of hiding your source of inspiration.

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        • #49
          <<man that long writing...>>

          Yeah, welll...there's a lot to say about this thing! Would you prefer that I broke the posts into smaller pieces? That's certainly possible to do.
          Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

          Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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          • #50
            Hi Craig,



            Thanks for de-mystifying a good deal of RAPTURE's capabilities. It truly seems like an amazing tool.

            But you might think I'm an "amazing tool" after you read my questions:


            1. What is the relationship-- or interrelationship-- between the EG envelope drawing window and the Steps window? Do these two commands BOTH address the currently illuminated parameter (e.g. AMP, PITCH, CUT, etc.)? And if so, don't they sort of "step on each other's toes?" Could you clarify a bit here between the two and the function of each?

            2. Where it says LO/HI KEY, and then offers a choice between 0 and 127... is that referring to MIDI KEY NUMBER? In other words, is this the place you assign key regions to that particular element? Is this is the way it creates multisampled patches?

            3. Also, on each Element's page, what is that small window to the right with a single horizontal line across it (under the LFO window).


            Many thanks... Pardon if these are dumb questions...!
            Every paint-stroke takes you farther and farther away from your initial concept. And you have to be thankful for that. Wayne Thiebaud


            Friend me on FACEBOOK!

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            • #51
              <<1. What is the relationship-- or interrelationship-- between the EG envelope drawing window and the Steps window? Do these two commands BOTH address the currently illuminated parameter (e.g. AMP, PITCH, CUT, etc.)? And if so, don't they sort of "step on each other's toes?" Could you clarify a bit here between the two and the function of each?>>

              Sure! The LFO, step sequencer, and EG are all in "parallel" -- think of them as being mixed together. This was really brought home to me in the wavesequencing example given earlier, where the EG provided a "master envelope" for the wave sequencing function being done by the Step Generator. It's actually very cool that it works this way.

              <<2. Where is says LO/HI KEY, and then offers a choice between 0 and 127... is that referring to MIDI KEY NUMBER? In other words, is this the place you assign key regions to that particular element?>>

              Yes, exactly. It also means that you can use the six Elements to create a "multisampled" patch. Let me give an example.

              I have a folder with five Minimoog sawtooth waves, each an octave apart. Suppose I want to make a really "fat" sound with lots of layering. There are two ways I can do this:

              1. Create an SFZ file with all five waves, and load it into an Element. Then, duplicate the Element multiple times (up to six), with slight detunings and such.

              2. Load each wave file into its own element, and use the key number option to limit each file to a specific range. Then I can use the Multi feature in each element to multiply the number of voices.

              Why use one over the other? Well, in option (1), you have a maximum of six layers. In option (2), you can multi a waveform to create up to nine voices (layers). However, (1) is less work to program, especially because there's no Group Edit option. Does this make sense?

              <<3. Also, on each Element's page, what is that small window to the right with a single horizontal line across it (under the LFO window).>>

              That sets keytracking for cutoff, resonance, pan, etc. (it also works with pitch, but the oscillator Keytrack parameter allows for more precise adjustments). I've used it to advantage on a tuned white noise patch to tune the filter. Unfortunately it's poorly calibrated, it's more of a qualitative than quantitative parameter, but I was still able to keytrack the filter precisely to create the tuned white noise effect.

              <<Many thanks... Pardon if these are dumb questions...!>>

              They aren't even REMOTELY dumb. A dumb question would be "Is the DVD-ROM with the program edible?" or "Do you have to replace the six strings when they wear out?"

              Okay, to my left on my music computer, Rapture is set up and ready to go. Let's see what it reveals tonight
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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              • #52
                Hey, maybe some Rapture expert can help me out here...

                I wanted to control the volume of an element from full on to full off with the mod wheel. I used the modulation matrix to assign Mod Wheel to Volume. I figured that this would override any envelope settings and control the Element volume parameter...nope.

                To make a long story short, I was able to get the effect I wanted by doing the following:

                * Turning the Amp Envelope Generator to ON
                * Creating a full-on envelope with maximum level sustain
                * Set Depth, Vel >Tim, and VelTrack to 0.0
                * Set Vel > Int to 0.1.
                If I set it to 0.0, it didn't work right.

                What am I missing? There must be a simpler way to just control an overall Element output level with the mod wheel. (In case anyone wonders, I'm trying to create a "theremin" patch where the mod wheel brings the sound in and out).
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                • #53
                  Many thanks, Craig.

                  So am I right in thinking that each element can only handle one wave and one wave only? Where is the "Duplicate element" command located?

                  The MULTI function... is it a chorus? (ie., does it partake of the delay/phase stuff that a chorus does?

                  Does RAPTURE have a window for viewing the actual contour of your 3 EQ settings?

                  Can RAPTURE users share their custom-made patches (with custom waves) with other RAPTURE users? I'm guessing RAPTURE doesn't save the wave along with the patch, so you'd have to send your recipient both the RAPTURE patch and all relevant waves, right? Into which Windows folder would the recipient place the WAV's so RAPTURE could automatically find them?

                  The overall picture I'm getting of RAPTURE is that it's rather like a SoundFont... on steroids, no?

                  I'm also thinking that, with all RAPTURE's temporal movement, the ambient composer could almost lay down the theme of a whole song-- just with one patch alone!!
                  Every paint-stroke takes you farther and farther away from your initial concept. And you have to be thankful for that. Wayne Thiebaud


                  Friend me on FACEBOOK!

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    <<So am I right in thinking that each element can only handle one wave and one wave only?>>

                    One wave, or an SFZ set of multisampled waves.

                    <<Where is the "Duplicate element" command located?>>

                    You right-click on an Element number, select copy, then right-click on another Element and select paste.
                    <<The MULTI function... is it a chorus?>>

                    It's not a signal processor, it actually creates more voices and detunes/spreads them. This does result in the same kind of sound as chorusing, just like detuning two oscillators slightly sounds like flanging, but it is an actual "chorus" of waves rather than a wave being chorused.

                    <<Does RAPTURE have a window for viewing the actual contour of your 3 EQ settings? >>

                    There's no frequency response graph, if that's what you mean.

                    <<Can RAPTURE users share their custom-made patches (with custom waves) with other RAPTURE users? I'm guessing RAPTURE doesn't save the wave along with the patch, so you'd have to send your recipient both the RAPTURE patch and all relevant waves, right?>>

                    Yes.

                    << Into which Windows folder would the recipient place the WAV's so RAPTURE could automatically find them?>>

                    In the Rapture folder.

                    <<The overall picture I'm getting of RAPTURE is that it's rather like a SoundFont... on steroids, no?>>

                    Well...if so, those steroids are mega-steroids, as you'll see in some of the future audio examples.

                    <<I'm also thinking that, with all RAPTURE's temporal movement, the ambient composer could almost lay down the theme of a whole song-- just with one patch alone!!>>

                    You are definitely right about that!
                    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                    • #55
                      This is a program where the LFOs sure do a lot more than just add vibrato. As with the other modulators, Pitch, Cutoff 1, Resonance 1, Cutoff 2, Resonance 2, Pan, and Amplitude each have their own LFO.

                      Let's look at the various parameters. Click on the attachment to see the part of the screen that relates to the LFO.

                      * Status can be on or off.
                      * Frequency is in play only if you turn off sync to host; it ranges from 0.01 to 40Hz.
                      * Sync goes from 1/8t to 128d. Each cycle equals the selected beat value. For example, if you select 1/8, there's a cycle every eighth of a beat.
                      * Delay determines how long it takes before the LFO kicks in, up to 10 seconds.
                      * Fade fades in the LFO over up to 10 seconds. You can combine Delay and Fade, so there's a certain amount of delay before the LFO fades in.
                      * Depth just sets the overall depth of the LFO.

                      You'll also note the waveform display. 28 waveforms come with Rapture, (26 periodic and two random) but what's really cool is you can create your own waveforms out of any WAV file; there can be a total of 100 waveforms. I did a half-wave rectified sine LFO waveform just for kicks.

                      But this is important for another reason: There's no smoothing option for the LFO, so anything like a square or sawtooth wave has a very sharp transition that might cause a click when controlling a parameter. So, you can create a waveform that's smoothed and use that. I'd rather have a smoothing control, but hey, maybe next version...
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                      • #56
                        Just to show what you can do with the LFO, I've prepared a little audio example. Click on the attachment to hear the LFOs at work.

                        Here's what's happening. An Element has a multisampled Moog sawtooth SFZ file loaded. All the modulation is done with LFOs, specifically:

                        * One LFO is set to a negative-going sawtooth and feeds the Filter 1 cutoff, with sync set to 1/4 (1/4 of a beat, or a sixteenth note). This produces a series of quick filter frequency decays.
                        * Another LFO is set the same way, but feeds the Amp. So, you have what sounds like a series of 16th notes with sharp amplitude and filter envelope decays.
                        * Another LFO is set for a slow sweep (every 16 beats) and varies Filter 2's cutoff.

                        But a sound is worth a thousand words, so check out the example.
                        Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                        Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                        • #57
                          Great example of LFO's at work CA.

                          You can have a pitch sweep/step workin as the lfo's do there thing as well. Almost to many options in Rapture.

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                          • #58
                            <<You can have a pitch sweep/step workin as the lfo's do there thing as well.>>

                            The next example is going to be a fun step sequencer thing that uses only the step sequencer to accomplish the desired results.

                            I wouldn't say there are too many options! You don't have to use all of them But the more you know about the program, the better. For example, I tried doing the last example with the step sequencer and realized it would be a whole lot easier just to use the LFOs.
                            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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                            • #59
                              I personally use step when I'm reaching for a discrete change to happen with smoothing to soften the abrupt change to something with a softer edge. Of course any change can be drawn in.

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                              • #60
                                <<I personally use step when I'm reaching for a discrete change to happen with smoothing to soften the abrupt change to something with a softer edge. >>

                                Yes, I think the smoothing function is incredibly useful! I wish the LFOs had it too. The easiest way to create a "smooth" waveform is to take something like a sawtooth, run it through a lowpass filter, then save it as a custom LFO waveform.
                                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

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