Harmony Central Forums
Announcement
Collapse
No announcement yet.

6283072

Collapse



X
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    I'm on the road and don't have the CD with me, but as I recall, each scale repeats twice (maybe Aaron can check in and confirm). Of course, just about every CD player lets you repeat a track, so that would be a good option to have a scale repeat as many times as you like.
    Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

    Subscribe, like, and share the links!

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks Craig, I appreciate the reply, that's what I was looking for.
      We need to talk about your flair.

      Comment


      • #18
        I'm really surprised that a Pro Review on something like Scales and Rhythm hasn't generated the same number of posts as the latest audio interface!

        But kudos to Craig for choosing this topic. A lot of starting out musicians ask me what they can do to get better, and to have an inexpensive product that helps them out makes a lot of sense. For some people I wouldn't be surprised if something like this can have a bigger impact on the quality of a recording than buying the latest greatest audio interface.

        Reading the Pro Review so far, I was a little freaked out by the fact that every time a question popped up in my head, Craig seemed to answer it in his next post.

        -plb

        Comment


        • #19
          Reading about this product, I have two concerns.

          Beef #1

          My first concern has to do with a point that Craig and Stranger are making in two different ways in the following quotes:

          Originally posted by Anderton
          The only limitation is that Scales and Rhythm doesn't tell you about proper fingerings, so I'm kind of faking that

          Originally posted by the stranger
          The guy should market these to guitar/piano teachers and music stores. This is almost so obvious, it should be something you just get because you want to have the right set of tools.

          It's not enough to practice scales, you have to practice them correctly. A good teacher as an adjunct to buying a product like this should almost be a requirement. The thing is, if you're practicing this kind of basic excercise the right way, it can dramatically improve your overall playing. But if you're practicing it the wrong way, you can not only not improve, but also you can hurt yourself.

          I know many musicians - guitarists, keyboardists, etc. - with hand, arm, shoulder and tendon injuries. If you are playing your instrument wrong and are doing something like this over and over, you can amplify a small physical mistake into an injury.

          You can also fortify bad habbits. For example, if Craig is practicing scales with the wrong fingerings, he may be reinforcing bad habbits and impeding his ability to play fast supple scales down the road.

          The injury thing though - particularly with young players - having an experienced teacher show you the right way is just such a critical part of the formula. And a lot of the physical mechanics are counterintuitive. It can take years to learn how not to tense up.

          Beef #2

          My second beef has to do with the BPM. I could see the system encouraging players to practice at the faster tempos - to graduate from slow to fast ASAP. My experience is that practicing this kind of excercise at a slower tempo is more valuable than practicing it at a fast tempo. The best use of this kind of thing, I think, is to practice slowly and make sure that you are perfecting how you are playing. Then, fast playing is easy and natural. Ironically, it's players who think they need to practice everything at a fast tempo who have the hardest time playing fast.

          So IMHO I think there should be more gradations between 50 BPM and 100 BPM and some way to encourage slow practice. It's almost like telling the customer: we want you to take something painful and boring, like practicing scales, and make it even more painful and boring, by encouraging you to practice them slowly! But this is really the way to become a monster player, even though it is also counterintuitive.

          With the caveats "use under proper supervision" and "practice slowly" it seems like a great tool at $20. I think Stranger's recommendation is a good one: market to teachers.

          -peaceloveandbrittanylips

          Comment


          • #20
            << With the caveats "use under proper supervision" and "practice slowly" it seems like a great tool at $20. I think Stranger's recommendation is a good one: market to teachers. >>

            Those are valid concerns. As to the first comment, I know scale fingerings for guitar, I just don't practice them enough But my keyboard foundation is not as firm.

            As I noted earlier this is not a "method" course, it's a brush up. I don't think it's designed to take you from ground zero to being a great player, but maybe Aaron could comment on that. It really seems like it's designed to make it easy to warm up and practice for a low price.

            The practice slowly thing...well, 50 BPM is plenty slow for me but I do find the faster speeds helpful not so much for practicing the scales, but for practicing the timing with respect to the drum machine. It's important to remember there are two components to this.
            Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

            Subscribe, like, and share the links!

            Comment


            • #21
              <<I think Stranger's recommendation is a good one: market to teachers. >>

              Yes! That way they can give the lesson, then say "Here, practice to this."
              Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

              Subscribe, like, and share the links!

              Comment


              • #22
                It also seems to me that if the company wants to branch out, the next product could be a DVD that shows fingerings, a booklet with fingerings and scale charts, and a CD-ROM with MIDI sequences in all keys and lots of modes (set up for GM, of course). Something like this would of course be a lot more expensive, but I think it would make a logical "next step."
                Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                Comment


                • #23
                  I realized I never checked in with the results of whether or not my playing improved after working with this for a week.

                  Bottom line: Yes, it did. Unfortunately, I can't be a control group and see if my playing improved if I just played for a week without doing scales, just playing or whatever. But my sense is that the CD forced me to be more disciplined about practicing scales to particular rhythms than would have happened without the CD.

                  If you have a drum machine sitting around and know your scales, you'd likely derive just as much benefit as you would from using the CD. But if like me you need a little poke to get off your butt and do some drills, the CD can help provide that.
                  Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                  Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Is this product still available? If so, could you post a link to the website.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The link was given twice in the review, but I clicked on them and no results were returned. Try http://www.scalesandrhythm.com and see if you have better luck than I did...
                      Simplicity, my new album project, is now streamable from my YouTube channel.

                      Subscribe, like, and share the links!

                      Comment













                      Working...
                      X